Body Found in Vacaville, Where Sandra Coke Is Being Searched For

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 9, 2013 Updated: August 12, 2013

A body has been found in Vacaville, California, where rescue teams have been searching for a missing woman, Sandra Coke.

Police began searching for the missing Oakland woman today, starting with the Solano County Fairgrounds.

A search of Vacaville has turned up a body, according to reporter Erin Ivie

Oakland police spokeswoman Johnna Watson wouldn’t say whether police think Coke, 50, is still alive. Coke was last seen on Sunday night with Randy Alana, an ex-boyfriend who has a lengthy criminal history.

“We will search every area that’s necessary,” Watson said. “We want to keep a very wide scope in the investigation.”

Coke is a capital case investigator for the federal public defender’s office in Sacramento.

Coke left her Oakland home shortly after 8:30 p.m. Sunday after reportedly telling her 15-year-old daughter she was meeting with someone who had found her missing dog.

Coke said she would be back in 30 minutes. Her daughter called police when her mother did not return home that night.

A family friend, Laura Burstein, said Coke dated Alana more than 20 years ago. Another friend, Dan Abrahamson, told KGO-TV, that Alana recently reappeared in the area and reached out to Coke for help.

“All we ask is if he has any information about the whereabouts of Sandra that he immediately come forward with it,” Burstein said.

Alana was being held without bail. He is considered a high-risk sex, with state records showing he has convictions for rape and kidnapping.

Earlier Thursday, dozens of Coke’s family and friends announced a $100,000 reward for any information leading to her return.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.