Bloomberg’s Big Lead Narrows, NJ Gov. Race Too Close to Call

November 2, 2009 Updated: October 1, 2015

TIGHT RACE: New Jersey Republican nominee for Governor Chris Christie (C) and his running mate Sheriff Kim Guadagno (L) make some phone calls to voters at Monmouth County Republican Headquarters on Tuesday in Freehold, New Jersey. (Hiroko Masuike/Getty Images)
TIGHT RACE: New Jersey Republican nominee for Governor Chris Christie (C) and his running mate Sheriff Kim Guadagno (L) make some phone calls to voters at Monmouth County Republican Headquarters on Tuesday in Freehold, New Jersey. (Hiroko Masuike/Getty Images)
NEW YORK—With election day on Tuesday, polls are showing Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg ahead of Comptroller William Thompson by over 10 percent in the race for mayor. It is still a toss-up in the election for New Jersey Governor, with Christopher Christie leading Gov. Jon Corzine by only 2 percent.

According to a Quinnipiac University poll, Thompson has made progress reducing Bloomberg’s previous lead in the polls of 18 percent down to 12, but it may not be enough to seal the deal. Ten percent of the voters are still undecided. The independent candidate Stephen Christopher is not posing much of a threat to either side with only one percent of the votes.

Not taking any chances, Bloomberg spent approximately $100 million on the race, more than any other mayoral candidate in American history.

The decision for New Jersey Governor has been close since the beginning and remains so down to the wire. Last week Gov. Corzine was leading Christie in the polls with 42 to 40 percent. Now, Christie leads Corzine 42 to 40 percent, and independent Chris Daggett is keeping them both on their feet with 12 percent.

With over 10 percent of New Jersey voters on both sides saying they may change their minds, Daggett’s votes are making the election a nail biter.

"Daggett is the key to an incredibly close New Jersey election," said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

It remains unclear which candidate Daggett is taking away votes from, but it is clear that his popularity voices a general dissatisfaction with the two traditional parties.

Quinnipiac University is getting their numbers from a pool of 1,360 voters that the university questioned last weekend. The University claims there is a 2.7 percent margin for error in its poll.