Blind Man Falls on Subway Tracks in Brooklyn

By Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson covers the business of luxury for Epoch Times. Sarah has worked for media organizations in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and graduated with merit from the Aoraki Polytechnic School of Journalism in 2005. Sarah is almost fluent in Mandarin Chinese. Originally from New Zealand, she now lives next to the Highline in Manhattan's most up-and-coming neighborhood, West Chelsea.
October 4, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

NEW YORK—Trains were delayed in Brooklyn on the morning of Oct. 4 after a man fell or jumped onto the subway tracks at the Utica Ave. station, and started walking northbound, authorities said.

Deirdre Parker, a spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), said they were notified that an “emotionally disturbed person” jumped onto the northbound track on the C line at Utica Ave. at 9:38 a.m. and began walking north. 

The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) said the person was blind and fell. 

The police said they did not have any information about the incident.

At 9:40 a.m. the MTA cut power to the tracks, and at 10:10 a.m. emergency service removed the person. At 10:26 a.m. power was restored.

The man was taken to Kings County Hospital and listed in a stable condition, with non-life threatening injuries, a spokesman for FDNY said.

Earlier this week, a legally blind man fell off a platform on the L line in Brooklyn, but was saved by a transit worker before a train arrived, the Daily News reported.

In November, a blind man had tried to board a G train at the Church Avenue/McDonald Avenue station in Kensington, but the train had not arrived, the New York Post reported. He fell beneath the tracks avoiding being hit by the oncoming train. He did not suffer any serious injuries.

Sarah Matheson covers the business of luxury for Epoch Times. Sarah has worked for media organizations in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and graduated with merit from the Aoraki Polytechnic School of Journalism in 2005. Sarah is almost fluent in Mandarin Chinese. Originally from New Zealand, she now lives next to the Highline in Manhattan's most up-and-coming neighborhood, West Chelsea.