Biden Administration’s COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for Private Businesses to Be Published Soon

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
November 1, 2021 Updated: November 1, 2021

The proposed federal COVID-19 vaccine mandate for private businesses across the United States is set to be published in the near future, President Joe Biden’s administration said Monday.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), an office inside the Department of Labor, developed the mandate.

OSHA submitted the emergency temporary standard to the White House Office of Management and Budget on Oct. 12 for review. That review was completed on Nov. 1, a Department of Labor spokesperson told The Epoch Times in an email.

“The Federal Register will publish the emergency temporary standard in the coming days,” the spokesperson said.

A flurry of lawsuits are expected to be lodged once the text of the rule is made public, as critics argue it’s unconstitutional and a broad overreach of federal powers.

The core of the mandate is forcing businesses that have 100 or more workers to require proof of COVID-19 vaccination or regular testing for the disease, at least once a week.

“Covered employers must develop, implement, and enforce a mandatory COVID-19 vaccination policy, unless they adopt a policy requiring employees to choose either to get vaccinated or to undergo regular COVID-19 testing and wear a face covering at work,” the spokesperson said.

The rule also requires employers to provide paid time to workers to get a vaccine and paid sick leave to recover from any side effects.

The White House has defended the mandate, arguing it’s lawful under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.