Rep. Biggs: Enough Evidence to Sustain Arizona Election Lawsuit

December 2, 2020 Updated: December 3, 2020

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) says there is enough evidence for President Donald Trump’s legal team to file and “sustain a lawsuit” in Arizona.

Citing witness statements made to Republican Arizona state legislators, Biggs told Newsmax that the testimonials can be used in lawsuits alleging irregularities or fraud.

“What they showed is that there’s actually evidence to sustain a lawsuit,” Biggs said, “and if you can sustain a lawsuit, then the courts would have to really get involved. And also, they would hopefully order a forensic audit in Arizona, which is what a lot of us have been asking for several weeks.”

Earlier this week. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced he would certify the election results. Data currently show Democrat Joe Biden leading Trump by more than 10,000 votes.

But with an audit, Biggs and others “would know for certain about those mail-in ballots, which were about 75 percent of the ballots cast in Arizona,” he remarked.

Trump campaign lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis told Arizona’s State Legislature on Nov. 30 that based on the allegations of fraud, the GOP-controlled state House and Senate should affirm their power to call up electors to the Electoral College. They argued that the election wasn’t conducted in a legitimate manner in Maricopa and Pima counties.

Maricopa County Republican Chair Linda Brickman told the lawmakers that she personally witnessed votes for Trump go to Joe Biden at the Maricopa County Tabulation Center. She testified that she and her Democratic partner witnessed “more than once” Trump votes default and switch to Biden.

“I observed, with my Democratic partner, the preparation of a new ballot, since the original one was soiled, or wouldn’t go through the tabulators. I read her a Trump Republican ballot, and as soon as she entered it into the system, the ballot defaulted on the screen to a Biden Democratic ballot,” Brickman told GOP Arizona State legislators.

Other witnesses, including self-described cybersecurity expert and retired Army Col. Phil Waldron, said that voting machines in some areas in Arizona may have been connected to the Internet. He cited a user manual for the machines that direct one on how to connect them to the Internet, which, if confirmed, would pose a major security risk.

Similar hearings were held in Michigan and Pennsylvania. Giuliani is slated to testify in front of the Michigan State House later Wednesday.