Apple and Adobe Intensify Flash Dispute

April 29, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

CEO Steve Jobs announces the new iPad as he speaks during an Apple Special Event at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts January 27, 2010 in San Francisco, California. (Ryan Anson/AFP/Getty Images)
CEO Steve Jobs announces the new iPad as he speaks during an Apple Special Event at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts January 27, 2010 in San Francisco, California. (Ryan Anson/AFP/Getty Images)
Apple Inc. flexed its muscle through a lengthy public statement by company Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs, who openly rejected Adobe Systems Inc..’s Flash Web and video platform on April 29.

Jobs accused the multimedia platform to be inappropriate for mobile devices, with “major technical drawbacks” evidently exacerbating the tension between the two companies.

"Flash was created during the PC (personal computer) era for PCs and mice," Jobs said in an open letter posted at the Cupertino, California-based firm's website.

"But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces, and open Web standards—all areas where Flash falls short," Jobs said.

Adobe has retaliated with its CEO responding to Apple’s statement as a “smokescreen,” according to a Wall Street Journal interview live-blogged online.

The outbursts from two high profile Silicon Valley companies have attracted substantial attention. Once Apple bans Flash-imbedded applications from its iPad and iPhone devices, programmers will have to create alternatives. In other words, although Flash was used in about 75 percent of the current online video market, Apple’s threats will undoubtedly challenge Adobe’s position.