Anthony Weiner Nearly Misses Chance to Vote in Midtown Manhattan

By Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson
Sarah Matheson covers the business of luxury for Epoch Times. Sarah has worked for media organizations in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and graduated with merit from the Aoraki Polytechnic School of Journalism in 2005. Sarah is almost fluent in Mandarin Chinese. Originally from New Zealand, she now lives next to the Highline in Manhattan's most up-and-coming neighborhood, West Chelsea.
September 10, 2013 Updated: September 10, 2013

NEW YORK—It felt like it wasn’t going to happen, but Anthony Weiner cast his vote at Baruch College’s Newman Hall on East 22nd Street this morning, on primary day, Sept. 10.

He was scheduled to arrive at 9:30 a.m. Around 9:40 a.m. his campaign aides arrived, but there was a problem.

Weiner’s signature was missing from the voter registration records. That meant he had been registered, by default, as an affidavit vote or a court order vote, said Valarie Grant, the Board of Elections coordinator for Newman Hall.

Weiner’s spokeswoman, Barbara Morgan, made call after call on her smartphone, as she tried to get permission from the Board of Elections for Weiner to vote in person 

At 10:20 a.m., almost an hour late, Weiner arrived with his 20-month-old son, Jordan. “Sorry for the hoopla,” Weiner said to the media who had been waiting for his arrival. “There was a mix up.”

“I feel frankly I ran a campaign that I wanted to run … I know that I am not a perfect messenger, but I’ve got the best ideas,” he said. 

His wife did not join him at the polling booth. She was in Washington, D.C. “late into the night,” Weiner said. “She’s got her own busy things going on.” 

He said he wanted to win the election. “There’s not a lot of moral victories in this line of work,” he said.

“I’m going to keep going all day today to win this election,” he said.

He said his campaign was still making phone calls to potential voters today, and if someone happens to get a “live person” on the line, Weiner was planning to talk to as many of them as possible himself. 

He said he may also do another subway stop today, but that had not been confirmed.

His son, Jordan, was starting to get a little tired by the end of all the questions, so Weiner put the toddler in his black Bugaboo Camelot stroller. Jordan was dressed in dark-blue corduroy Armani Baby pants, little brown leather boat shoes, and a blue and white plaid shirt.

Weiner did not say what he planned to do if he did not win the election.

Sarah Matheson covers the business of luxury for Epoch Times. Sarah has worked for media organizations in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and graduated with merit from the Aoraki Polytechnic School of Journalism in 2005. Sarah is almost fluent in Mandarin Chinese. Originally from New Zealand, she now lives next to the Highline in Manhattan's most up-and-coming neighborhood, West Chelsea.