Amber Alert Issued For Missing West Virginia Girl Believed to Be In ‘Extreme Danger’

July 23, 2019 Updated: July 23, 2019

West Virginia State Police have issued an Amber Alert for a missing 4-year-old girl who is believed to be “in extreme danger.”

Police said Gracelynn June Scritchfield was last seen on July 6 in Fairmont, West Virginia, “wearing summer attire.” No specific description of the clothing was provided.

The child is described as Caucasian with brown-blonde hair, blue eyes, weighing about 35 pounds, and standing 3 feet tall.

Authorities said the child was probably abducted by her biological father, Arlie Edward Hetrick III.

Related Coverage
Amber Alert Issued For Missing West Virginia Girl Believed to Be In ‘Extreme Danger’Amber Alert for 18-Month-Old Cancelled, Investigators Searching Landfill for Body

According to the police, Hetrick III is described as a 26-year-old Caucasian with brown hair, blue eyes, weighing about 140 pounds and standing 5-feet 9 inches tall.

Authorities noted the missing girl and her biological father may be traveling in a gold 2001 Subaru Forester with West Virginia license plate 1TH163.

Police have asked anyone with information to call 911.

Missing Children

There were 424,066 missing children reported in the FBI’s National Crime Information Center in 2018, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). Under federal law, when a child is reported missing to law enforcement they must be entered into the database. In 2017, there were 464,324 entries.

national-center-for-missing-children
Reve Walsh and John Walsh speak in Washington on May 18, 2011. (Kris Connor/Getty Images)

“This number represents reports of missing children. That means if a child runs away multiple times in a year, each instance would be entered into NCIC separately and counted in the yearly total. Likewise, if an entry is withdrawn and amended or updated, that would also be reflected in the total,” the center notes on its website.

“Unfortunately, since many children are never reported missing, there is no reliable way to determine the total number of children who are actually missing in the U.S.,” NCMEC (National Center for Missing & Exploited Children) added.

In 2018, the center said it assisted officers and families with the cases of more than 25,000 missing children. In those cases, 92 percent were endangered runaways, and 4 percent were family abductions.

The center said that it participates in the Amber Alert Program, which is a voluntary partnership between numerous entities including broadcasters, transportation agencies, and law enforcement agencies. The Amber Alert Program issues urgent bulletins in the most serious child abduction cases.

According to the NCMEC, to date, 941 children have been successfully recovered as a result of the Amber Alert Program.

The center notes that of the more than 23,500 runaways reported in 2018, about one in seven were likely victims of child sex trafficking.

Facts About Crime in the United States

Violent crime in the United States has fallen sharply over the past 25 years, according to both the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) and the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) (pdf).

The rate of violent crimes fell by 49 percent between 1993 and 2017, according to the FBI’s UCR, which only reflects crimes reported to the police.

The violent crime rate dropped by 74 percent between 1993 and 2017, according to the BJS’s NCVS, which takes into account both crimes that have been reported to the police and those that have not.

The FBI recently released preliminary data for 2018. According to the Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report, January to June 2018, violent crime rates in the United States dropped by 4.3 percent compared to the same six-month period in 2017.

While the overall rate of violent crime has seen a steady downward drop since its peak in the 1990s, there have been several upticks that bucked the trend.

Between 2014 and 2016, the murder rate increased by more than 20 percent, to 5.4 per 100,000 residents, from 4.4, according to an Epoch Times analysis of FBI data. The last two-year period that the rate soared so quickly was between 1966 and 1968.

Follow Tom on Twitter: @OZImekTOM
RECOMMENDED
TOP VIDEOS