Kansas Sheriff’s Office Still Probing 12 Claims of 2020 Election Fraud

May 10, 2021 Updated: May 10, 2021

The Shawnee County Sheriff’s Office in Kansas confirmed last week that it’s still investigating claims of voter fraud from the 2020 election.

Twelve cases are being investigated, according to the Topeka Capital-Journal, which cited Deputy Abigail Christian, the sheriff’s office spokesperson; she said she couldn’t release more details about the investigations.

State Rep. Vic Miller, a Democrat, had asked Shawnee County District Attorney Mike Kagay to look into the alleged election fraud, noting that 12 people had listed UPS stores and other businesses in Topeka as their places of residence.

Andrew Howell, the Shawnee County election commissioner, said that he doesn’t recall anyone contacting him or the election office about election fraud but said his office is trying to “clean up the list.” He added that using a UPS address or business address doesn’t necessarily mean there was election fraud involved, according to the Journal.

“There are situations that do occur where people are allowed to use unusual addresses,” Howell said. “It doesn’t on its face alone prove anything.”

The sheriff’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request by The Epoch Times for comment.

In Pennsylvania, several people recently have been charged with election fraud stemming from the Nov. 3 election, including two women in Bucks County who allegedly cast ballots on behalf of their deceased mothers. District Attorney Matthew Weintraub told news outlets that the incidents are isolated and said there was no evidence of “widespread or systematic election fraud here in Bucks County.”

Two weeks ago, a Delaware County man identified as 70-year-old Bruce Bartman pleaded guilty and admitted he “made a stupid mistake” when he cast a ballot for his deceased mother.

Since the November election, some GOP state legislatures have passed laws to strengthen the rules around absentee and mail-in ballots. That includes Florida’s legislature, which last week approved a bill that provides more regulations for ballot drop boxes as well as more identification requirements for voters who request a mail-in ballot, while Texas’s state House passed a similar bill on May 7.

Immediately after the Florida bill was signed into law, Democratic lawyers and other groups filed several lawsuits challenging the measure as unconstitutional.