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Australian Teen Bitten by World’s Most Venomous Snake

By Alex Johnston
Epoch Times Staff
Created: September 27, 2012 Last Updated: October 4, 2012
Related articles: World » Asia Pacific
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Video footage uploaded to YouTube shows an Inland Taipan, the most venomous snake in the world, in captivity. New South Wales police said on Sept. 27 that a Taipan bit a teenage boy, who is currently recovering in a local hospital. (YouTube.com)

Video footage uploaded to YouTube shows an Inland Taipan, the most venomous snake in the world, in captivity. New South Wales police said on Sept. 27 that a Taipan bit a teenage boy, who is currently recovering in a local hospital. (YouTube.com)

Australian police are investigating how a teenage boy from Sydney was bitten by the world’s most venomous snake, the Inland Taipan.

A 17-year-old boy went to the emergency room saying he had been bitten on his left hand by a snake. Hospital staff at Kurri Kurri Hospital alerted police of the incident, New South Wales police said in a statement.

The snake was taken to the hospital and wildlife volunteers said it was the Inland Taipan. A single drop of the snake’s venom is believed to be able to kill 100 people and causes paralysis.

“Police have been advised this snake is not indigenous to the area,” the statement reads.

The boy was given an anti-venom and is said to be in stable condition while he is treated at the Mater Hospital in Newcastle.

“Police are now attempting to establish how the youth came to be bitten, and hope to speak to the young man once he is considered well enough,” police said.

Geoff Isbister, a toxicologist with Mater, told the Australia Broadcasting Corporation that recovery from such a snakebite could take several weeks.

“It’s a very large snake and when it bites, it definitely strikes, often strikes twice and envenoms in almost every case,” he said. “In terms of its effects, it causes blood not to clot, but its most important effect is it causes neurotoxicity. So if it’s not treated early, it can cause paralysis.”

Inland Taipans reside in central Australia’s arid and rugged regions, and are generally shy and reclusive, opting to retreat if threatened. The suburb of Kurri Kurri, where the boy is currently seeking medical treatment, is located hundreds of miles from where the snakes are generally found.

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