Whitmer Faces IRS Complaint, New Bill Over Florida Trip She Failed to Disclose

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
May 20, 2021 Updated: May 20, 2021

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is facing a complaint to federal tax authorities and new state legislation over a trip she took to Florida earlier this year but didn’t initially disclose.

Whitmer, a Democrat, visited her father in Florida in March. She omitted the trip when discussing her recent travel in April, but her office has since reluctantly released details about the trip following local media coverage.

Whitmer’s office disclosed on May 14 that Michigan Transition 2019, a corporate nonprofit formed to pay for the governor’s inauguration, paid for the charter that flew her to and from Florida, and that the governor had paid $855 out of pocket.

Michigan Rising Action, a nonprofit aimed to hold liberals accountable, filed a complaint with the Internal Revenue Service on May 19, alleging that the personal trip “is not within the exempt purpose of Michigan Transition 2019.”

The corporate nonprofit’s $27,521 payment “was a private benefit to Governor Whitmer,” it noted in the complaint, encouraging federal tax officials to investigate whether the nonprofit violated tax law.

“Governor Whitmer’s use of 501(c)(4) funds for personal benefit is a clear violation of the law, and we’ve asked the IRS to launch a full investigation into the matter,” Eric Ventimiglia, executive director of Michigan Rising Action, said in a statement.

“From her blatant hypocrisy to the litany of ethical and legal violations, Governor Whitmer has spent the last two months misleading the people of Michigan about her trip to Florida. It’s time for her to be held accountable.”

Republican lawmakers in Michigan have recently introduced a bill that would require Whitmer to notify them when she plans to leave the state.

“We’re simply asking to know who is fulfilling the duties and responsibilities of governor in your absence,” state Sen. Tom Barrett, a Republican, told WLNS.

Whitmer’s office didn’t respond to a request for comment.

In a statement to news outlets, press secretary Bobby Leddy said the Michigan Constitution already clearly outlines a process to ensure that there is always an acting governor available to continue the functions of the state in case of an emergency.

“If the Legislature wants to waste their time playing games, that’s their own decision, but Gov. Whitmer is going to remain focused on ending this pandemic and putting Michigan back to work,” he said.

Michigan State Police spokeswoman Shanon Banner told outlets that sending notification of the governor’s travel plans would be a security concern, especially in light of the alleged kidnapping plot against Whitmer that was uncovered last year.

“The more people who know or have access to her movements, the higher the risk level for both her and her executive protection detail,” Banner said.

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.