US Airways to Cut 1,000 Jobs, Reduce Service

October 28, 2009 Updated: October 1, 2015

In this file photo, a passenger checks in for a flight at the U.S. Airways counter at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, Illinois. The airline announced that it would cut 1,000 jobs and focus on some core routes as it struggles to return to profitability. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
In this file photo, a passenger checks in for a flight at the U.S. Airways counter at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, Illinois. The airline announced that it would cut 1,000 jobs and focus on some core routes as it struggles to return to profitability. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
US Airways Group on Wednesday announced that it will cut routes and shift its focus to its major hubs and shuttle services in an effort to return to profitability.

For the first six months of 2009, the airline lost $45 million.

The company said that it would also cut 1,000 jobs by next year, as a part of a bigger effort to reduce costs at the airline as it trims its future revenue projections.

In a letter to employees, CEO Doug Parker said the company will “focus on our key network strengths at our hubs in Charlotte, Philadelphia and Phoenix,” according to its Web site. The airline will also focus on its shuttle service in and out of Washington D.C. at the Ronald Reagan Regional Airport.

The job cuts will begin next year and affect around 600 ramp and passenger service employees, 150 flight attendants, and almost 200 pilots. The company will also reduce service from Las Vegas, and close crew bases located in Boston, New York-LaGuardia, and Las Vegas.

US Airways is also suspending service to various European destinations from its hub in Philadelphia. It will stop flying to London-Gatwick, Milan, Birmingham, U.K., Shannon, Ireland, and Zurich.

The company will provide more support for its two major gateways in Charlotte and Philadelphia. “With nearly 6,000 employees in Charlotte, and many of our operation support systems located here as well, we are certainly proud to call Charlotte home," Parker said in a statement.

“As we evaluated our international routes in Philadelphia, we made the necessary decisions to pull down capacity that simply isn't profitable in today's economic environment,” Parker added. “However, we remain firmly committed to exploring additional opportunities as the economy slowly recovers.”