Girl Scouts cut out stars from the US flag and send them to cops around the country

“We process them with a little note that says, ‘I am part of our American flag. I can no longer fly. Please carry me as a reminder that you are not forgotten’”
July 25, 2018 11:51 am Last Updated: July 25, 2018 11:51 am

When the American flag is worn-out or torn, it’s no longer suitable for display, and there are guidelines on how to properly dispose of Old Glory. But a group of Girl Scouts has found an inspiring new use for old flags that could bring a lot of joy to people in need.

Two years ago, Carol Lucero, a retired police officer from Denver, Colorado, was with her daughter Isabella when they found a star left on her windshield. This act of kindness inspired them to pay it forward, with the help of Isabella’s Girl Scout troop.

The idea: to send stars cut from old American flags to police officers around the country.

“We process them with a little note that says, ‘I am part of our American flag. I can no longer fly. Please carry me as a reminder that you are not forgotten,’” Lucero told CBS Denver.

Screenshot via YouTube/CBS Denver

Thanks to old flag donations from Adams County, local Girl Scouts, and their mothers gather throughout the year to cut and sew the stars into keepsakes.

“We do this throughout the year, like once or twice a month” Girl Scout cadet Kaitlyn Duncan said.

They’ve already sent 30,000 stars to families and agencies, and have no plans of slowing down any time soon. The remains of the flags are sent to be disposed of according to U.S. flag code.

Screenshot via YouTube/CBS Denver

Lucero hopes that the officers receiving the stars will find some light in what can be a distressing job.

“Knowing what those families go through and the pain that departments go through when a hero is killed in the line of duty,” Lucero said. “This is really the least that we can do.”

Screenshot via YouTube/CBS Denver

She says that some families write to thank them for the stars, reminding the scouts that all their hard work goes to a worthy cause.

“Those are hard, but then it’s encouraging too that we are doing good work and we need to keep it up,” Lucero said.