Great Blue Whales Greet Visitors in Baja California, Mexico

May 24, 2017 4:11 pm Last Updated: May 24, 2017 4:11 pm

Two female Great Whales and their calf made a long trek to the coast of Baja California, Mexico, travelling more than 5,000 miles from the arctic. This annual trip is a migration to warmer waters where food is more plentiful.

Just saying hello! Scratch my head, will ya’?

Boats filled with people head out into the waters to greet them. More than 40-feet long, the adult females and their smaller calf love the attention of the attention they get in the form of scratch and tickles.

Amazing and rare, pictured here are two momma whales and their calf.

If you love to learn about whales, there is a plethora of information available. They have been researched and studied perhaps more than any other creature of the sea. What you can find in your own researching is some pretty remarkable and unknown information. For instance:

WHICH IS THE BIGGEST WHALE?

The blue whale is the largest animal ever to have lived on Earth; it is larger than any of the dinosaurs. The biggest recorded blue whale was a female in the Antarctic Ocean that was 30.5 m long (more than 3.5 times the length of a double-decker bus and as long as a Boeing 737 plane) with an estimated weight of 144 tons (almost the same as 2,000 men).

WHICH WHALE HAS THE BIGGEST BRAIN?

The sperm whale’s huge head, which is up to a third of its overall body length, houses the heaviest brain in the animal kingdom – up to 9kg. The head also consists of a cavity large enough to park a car inside that contains a yellowish wax called spermaceti that was much sought after by whalers.

WHICH IS THE MOST ENDANGERED WHALE?

The North Atlantic and North Pacific right whales are among the most endangered of all whales. Only around 400-500 individuals currently exist with fewer than 100 North Pacific right whales remaining. The Western Pacific gray whale may be down to the last 150 individuals but perhaps the most endangered whale lives in the Gulf of Mexico. Here, a genetically distinct population of Bryde’s whales has recently been discovered that may have fewer than 50 individuals remaining.

Credit: Barcroft TV