Are fossils linked to the legendary kraken enough to prove its terrifying existence?

By April Holloway, www.ancient-origins.net
November 8, 2017 4:35 pm Last Updated: November 8, 2017 4:35 pm

Scandinavian mythology claims the Kraken swallowed up whales and devoured ships. It has been described as a huge version of an octopus or squid. Legends have even claimed the terrifying sea creature measured one-mile long. Although the Kraken was first noted in the 13th century Icelandic saga, Örvar-Oddr, a researcher believes he has fossil evidence that is linked to this creature.

Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Dénys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. Was it a Kraken? (Public Domain)
Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Dénys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. Was it a Kraken? (Public Domain)

Initially found in 2011, fossils of a marine lizard showed a strange pattern which a researcher believes was caused by a Kraken-like octopus. The claim has been criticized, but Professor Mark McMenamin, a paleontologist at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, backed up this conclusion with other findings.

An odd arrangement of sea reptile vertebrae was found in Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park in Nevada. The animal was called an ichthyosaur and it lived around 200 to 250 million years ago. The manner in which the bones were found suggests that it was attacked by a much larger predator—perhaps supporting the hypothesis that a giant octopus or squid once dominated the seas. It has been estimated the creature which vanquished the ichthyosaur had to have been about 99 feet (30 meters) long; this far surpasses the largest giant octopus known today—a creature rarely larger than a human being.

The discovery of a fossil identified as part of the beak of a giant octopus or squid-like creature, along with more bones arranged in unusual patterns which have sucker markings, adds to McMenamin’s evidence. A “debris pile” of scattered bones were also found alongside the remains of the ichthyosaur.

McMenamin asserts that the bones’ arrangement and the location of the sucker markings indicate the ichthyosaur was drowned or had its neck snapped. From there, it seems the beast was moved, possibly to the Kraken’s lair, where it was dumped.

Could this discovery really point to the existence of the legendary Kraken? While the idea is interesting, further evidence is necessary.

This article was republished with permission. Read the original at Ancient-Origins.net

Visit The Epoch Times Beyond Science page on Facebook to continue exploring the new frontiers of science!

In Beyond Science, The Epoch Times explores research and accounts related to phenomena and theories that challenge our current knowledge. We delve into ideas that stimulate the imagination and open up new possibilities. Share your thoughts with us on these sometimes controversial topics in the comments section below.