Texas Church Bingo Event Drops Drag Queen Involved in School Shooting Plot

Parents vow to protest event
By Darlene McCormick Sanchez
Darlene McCormick Sanchez
Darlene McCormick Sanchez
Darlene McCormick Sanchez reports for The Epoch Times from Texas. She writes on a variety of issues with a focus on Texas politics, election fraud, and the erosion of traditional values. Before writing for The Epoch Times, she worked as an investigative reporter and covered crime, courts, and government for newspapers in Texas, Florida, and Connecticut. Her work on The Sinful Messiah series, which exposed Branch Davidians leader David Koresh, was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for investigative reporting in the 1990s.
September 21, 2022 Updated: September 21, 2022

A church in Texas has quietly removed a self-described “Goth” drag performer with a criminal conviction from what has been advertised as a family drag bingo event.

The First Christian Church, part of the Disciples of Christ denomination, openly supports LGBT people. In a flier, the church had advertised drag queen Tisha Flowers would be one of two performers at the sold-out event.

Flowers is a stage name for Jaysen Kettl, who portrays himself as a Goth drag queen, whose social media accounts include macabre content.

Area parents discovered that Kettl was convicted of being involved in a school shooting plot in 2004, after the news appeared in a Current Revolt article on Substack.

Images of Kettl that can be found online include one of him dressed in drag holding a red skull with pentagram earrings and another on Tik Tok where he is wearing a T-shirt with a Baphomet image surrounded by a pentagram.

An Instagram post depicts a skull and devil image announcing a Happy Death Day show.

The info spread quickly among parent groups.

Epoch Times Photo
Tisha Flowers was removed from the current drag bingo lineup. Parents plan to protest in Katy, Texas. (Courtesy of Rebecca Clark)

In 2004, Kettl, who was 17 at the time, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit capital murder for his role in plotting a school shooting at Vidor High School, according to a Houston Chronicle story.

The plot was foiled before anything occurred.

Kettl and at least one other student described how they wanted to torture some people by “nailing their hands to the table, chaining them to trees—before they killed certain people,” according to a prosecutor quoted in the report.

Word of the plot leaked to school administrators and was never carried out. Police found a backpack containing knives, chains, nails, and hammers in Kettl’s bedroom.

The Epoch Times attempted to reach Kettl and First Christian Church for comment but did not immediately receive a response.

The church’s flier now lists drag queen “Kiki” and disc jockey “Jamie” as part of the Sept. 24 event lineup.

The 5 p.m. event is open to all ages, according to the church website. The adults-only portion of the drag show begins at 8:30 p.m.

Grassroots parent groups have vowed to protest against the event, which they believe is harmful to children.

Rebecca Clark, executive director of the Fort Bend County County Citizens Defending Freedom, said parents are outraged the church had planned to feature a “satanist” that had plotted against a school.

“We are done tolerating the exploitation and sexualization of our children in this country,” Clark told The Epoch Times via text.

Sarah Feigleson, a Katy resident and CCDF’s Fort Bend County education leader, wrote in a text that parents need to wake up.

“Drag queens and children don’t mix,” she wrote. “These events are happening in your backyard. Stand up and raise a respectful ruckus.”

The church’s drag bingo event will benefit its “Transparent Closet.”

The clothing boutique is for “trans and exploring teens, youth and young adults,” according to the church website.

Darlene McCormick Sanchez reports for The Epoch Times from Texas. She writes on a variety of issues with a focus on Texas politics, election fraud, and the erosion of traditional values. Before writing for The Epoch Times, she worked as an investigative reporter and covered crime, courts, and government for newspapers in Texas, Florida, and Connecticut. Her work on The Sinful Messiah series, which exposed Branch Davidians leader David Koresh, was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for investigative reporting in the 1990s.