Iraq Suicide Bombers Kill 127

December 8, 2009 Updated: December 9, 2009

Iraq Suicide Bombers Kill 127

An Iraqi fireman surveys the damage at the site of a car bomb explosion on December 8, 2009 in Baghdad, Iraq. (Getty Images)
An Iraqi fireman surveys the damage at the site of a car bomb explosion on December 8, 2009 in Baghdad, Iraq. (Getty Images)
Five massive car bombs brought devastation to Baghdad on Tuesday, killing 127 people and injuring 448 others.

The first blast targeted a police patrol in the Dora district of the city. Four others were detonated near official buildings.

The attacks shattered a month of calm in the Iraqi capital, and came soon after the announcement of the election date of March 6. Politicians said the blasts bore all the hallmarks of an Al Qaeda attack.

"The aim is to show the government is unable to protect civilians and its own people and also to deter people from going to ballot boxes,” said Mowaffaq al-Rubaie, an ex-security adviser to the country, in an interview with BBC.

Smoke billows following an explosion in the Iraqi capital Baghdad on December 8, 2009. (Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images)
Smoke billows following an explosion in the Iraqi capital Baghdad on December 8, 2009. (Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images)
One of the suicide bombers detonated a bomb at an office of the finance ministry, while another attacker struck at a tunnel leading to the labor ministry. A third drove a four-wheel-drive car into a court building.

"The suicide bomber drove up to the court and the security forces tried to stop him by firing their Kalashnikovs, but they did not kill him before he exploded," police sergeant Emad Fadhil told AFP. Kalashnikov makes AK-47s and other assault rifles.

The fourth blast targeted a police patrol in the Dora district, causing 15 deaths. Twelve of them had been students at the nearby technical college, an interior ministry spokesman told journalists.

The explosions came within minutes of each other.

Rescue workers picked through the rubble throughout the afternoon in the effort to reclaim the bodies of the deceased.

"What crime have we committed?” survivor Ahmed Jabbar, emerging from a damaged ministry building, told the Associated Press news agency.

“Children and women were buried under debris."