India and Pakistan Meet for Peace

July 15, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Pakistan's Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi (R) and Indian Foreign Minister  S.M. Krishna met in Islamabad on Thursday to resume bilateral peace talks for the first time since the Mumbai bloodshed in 2008. (Amir Qureshi/Getty Images)
Pakistan's Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi (R) and Indian Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna met in Islamabad on Thursday to resume bilateral peace talks for the first time since the Mumbai bloodshed in 2008. (Amir Qureshi/Getty Images)
Indian Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna and his Pakistani counterpart Shah Mehmood Qureshi met in Islamabad on Thursday to resume bilateral peace talks for the first time since the Mumbai bloodshed in 2008, where Islamic gunmen killed more than 160 citizens.

According to AP, the two top officials discussed in a “frank, candid, and honest” manner how to prevent terrorism and militancy. They also reportedly reviewed the recent violence in the disputed Kashmir region, where Pakistani militants are allegedly infiltrating the Indian population.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Qureshi described the talks as a "resumption" of the peace dialogue, but remained reluctant to define any further steps in the process.

Krishna met also Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani. The current series of high-level talks between the two nuclear neighbors represents a third attempt in the last six months to come together since the diplomatic breakdown in 2008. The talks are seen as representing significant progress in their bilateral relations.

The two countries have had a strong rivalry since their birth in 1947, mainly over land and religion, and more recently, over nuclear weapons.