Hong Kong Umbrella Movement Daily Updates Archive (Day 50 to 79, Nov. 16 – Dec. 15)

November 21, 2014 10:00 am Last Updated: June 28, 2015 2:05 pm

The Umbrella Movement occupation phase has ended.

Epoch Times will be tracking democratic developments in Hong Kong here.

For what happened from day one till day fifty-four, check out the first half of our daily updates archive.

Want to know how the Umbrella Movement started and what’s it all about? Check out the key events leading up to the Sept. 28 demonstrations and our FAQ.

Day Seventy-nine

Monday, Dec. 15

Police clear away the pro-democracy protest camp in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 15, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)
Police clear away the pro-democracy protest camp in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 15, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)

Police cleared out the last remaining protest site in Causeway Bay.

– Police Commissioner Andy Tsang said that the force will start a three-month investigation into the instigators of the Occupy Movement.

When asked by reporters as to why officers hid their identifications during operations, Tsang reportedly said that police will only wear identification when necessary.

Tsang also said that the use of tear gas on Sept. 28 was “necessary.”

– At about 2:00 p.m. local time, Hong Kong’s Legislative Council staff asked protesters to leave, which they did voluntarily.

A government official (C) advises pro-democracy protesters that a deadline had ended to leave an area in front of the legislative council building in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on December 15, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)
A government official (C) advises pro-democracy protesters that a deadline had ended to leave an area in front of the legislative council building in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on December 15, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)

– League of Social Democrats’ Avery Ng and two students, who partook in occupy Hong Kong British Consulate, will go to London to speak at a Foreign Affairs Committee inquiry.

 

– There have been a number of reports about the Chinese Communist Party sending spies to tail Umbrella Movement and other pro-democracy people.

Day Seventy-eight

Sunday, Dec. 14

People take photos of an installation of paper umbrellas -- symbols of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong -- on a blockaded road in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 14, 2014. (Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)
People take photos of an installation of paper umbrellas — symbols of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong — on a blockaded road in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 14, 2014. (Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)

– About 800 police officers will be involved in the clearance of Causeway Bay on Monday, TVB reports.

– 9Wu continues in Mong Kok. Police have made over 20 arrests, and are charging an off-duty auxiliary police officer for taking part in the “Shopping Revolution.”

– Apply Daily reports that while Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying praised the police force for carrying out their tasks of suppressing the Umbrella Movement protesters, he has refused to consider giving them a pay rise.

– Media mogul Jimmy Lai resigns his position as Chairman and Executive director of Next Media, which publishes the pro-democracy publication Apple Daily.

After his arrest in Admiralty last week, Lai also resigned as Apple Daily’s publisher.

– Tomorrow, the Hong Kong Legislative Council will meet and decide what to do with the protesters camped in their compound.

– Alex Chow, secretary general from the Hong Kong Federation of Students, has urged people to start a “non-cooperation” campaign. Tactics include paying bills and rental slowly.

– Benny Tai, one of the co-founders of Occupy Central With Love and Peace, warned that peaceful demonstrations could make way fro violent riots if the government still refuses to listen to people’s demands for democracy.

Day Seventy-seven

Saturday, Dec. 13

The yellow banner reads " I want genuine universal suffrage." is displayed by protesters in the Causeway Bay shopping district, one of the occupied areas in Hong Kong Saturday, Dec.13, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
The yellow banner reads ” I want genuine universal suffrage.” is displayed by protesters in the Causeway Bay shopping district, one of the occupied areas in Hong Kong Saturday, Dec.13, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

– Police announce that the Causeway Bay protest site will be taken down on Monday, 9:30 a.m. local time.

– Two banners, one asking for Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to step down, and another with “I want true universal suffrage” written, were flown from Lion Rock hill and Devil’s Peak. The fire department removed the banners shortly after they were seen.

– Hong Kong Federation of Students deputy secretary Lester Shum notes that the Federation could have handled communications better with the other groups, and should have considered the overall public opinion.

Shum also says that the HKFS will have to reflect on the failed attempt at escalation by taking Lung Wo Road and areas outside government offices to prevent civil servants from reporting to work.

– Mong Kok 9Wu “shoppers” have “migrated” to the Causeway Bay site, as have some Admiralty protesters.

Some of these “shoppers” dress up in church robes and wander around the area, singing songs that poke fun at the police, government, and promote democracy.

The group dispersed shortly after police raised yellow flags.

– Liberal Party member James Tien asks the Hong Kong government to meet student leaders to discuss political reform. Tien adds that dialogue should take place even though the protest sites have been cleared.

Day Seventy-six

Friday, Dec. 12

A general view shows the pro-democracy protest site in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 12, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view shows the pro-democracy protest site in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong on December 12, 2014. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images)

– Occupied Admiralty streets were opened to traffic, 75 days after they were occupied.

– Hong Kong Federation of Students secretary general Alex Chow was released unconditionally and without charge from police custody.

– Police are expected to clear Causeway Bay next week.

– Henry Tang, the former Chief Secretary of Hong Kong and the runner-up to Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying in the 2012 Hong Kong Chief Executive Elections, says that Leung should properly reflect on how to do a better job now that the 75-day pro-democracy protests have “ended,” according to Ming Pao.

– Former Chief Secretary Anson Chan tells Bloomberg TV that Hong Kong will have free elections eventually.

“Hong Kong will never be the same again after the Umbrella Movement,” Chan said

“Whatever the views about the rights or wrongs of civil disobedience, I think one thing is very, very clear, that within the community there is a strong preference for genuine universal suffrage.

‘”I have no doubt it will come because that’s the only way to secure Hong Kong’s long-term stability and prosperity. Even within the rigid framework handed down by the standing committee of the NPC, there is still some room for maneuver.”

– HKFS asked why pan-democratic legislators only showed up at the final Admiralty clearance and not for the entire 75-day period.

–  Some of the Mong Kok “9Wu”/”Shopping Revolution” crowd has “migrated” to Causeway Bay, the last Umbrella Movement occupied area.

Day Seventy-five

Thursday, Dec. 11

Police officers clear a wooden crate outside Hong Kong's Government complex on December 11, 2014 in Hong Kong. (Brent Lewin/Getty Images)
Police officers clear a wooden crate outside Hong Kong’s Government complex on December 11, 2014 in Hong Kong. (Brent Lewin/Getty Images)

– Bailiffs and police showed up to clear out the Admiralty site.

Check out our coverage of the event:

– Before and during the clearing, police arrested several pro-democratic/radical group leaders. Notable among them is Civic Passion leader Wong Yeung Tat.

– Tamar Park has yet been cleared. Police have made a small passageway for protesters to exit the site via Tim Mei Avenue.

– Pan-democrat lawmakers and leaders of the Hong Kong Federation of Students were arrested.

Police started releasing them at about 3:00 a.m. local time (4:00 p.m. Thursday).

Those arrested were charged with unlawful assembly and obstruction of police duties.

– After his arrest at the Admiralty site, Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai resigned from his position of President of Apply Daily, a pro-democracy publication.

– About 200 “carollers”marched through Causeway Bay, singing Christmas carols with lyrics modified to mock the police and call for democratic reform in Hong Kong. They also weaved in words about the “Shopping Revolution.”

The “carollers” dressed up in fake priest robes and carried crosses with “I want true universal suffrage” banners.

At about 10:30 p.m. HKT, police raised yellow banners and asked them to disperse, which they did.

– The British government has asked the Chinese ambassador to the United Kingdom to explain why British MPs were barred from entering Hong Kong.

Day Seventy-four

Wednesday, Dec. 10

Protesters pose for photographs on a barricade at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Protesters pose for photographs on a barricade at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

– On the eve of the Admiralty site clearance, student leaders from Scholarism and the Hong Kong Federation of Students tell protesters not to give up hope and to resist police in a nonviolent fashion for as long a time as possible.

Alex Chow from HKFS and Scholarism’s Oscar Lai plan to let themselves be arrested during the clearing as part of the civil disobedience movement.

Prominent student leader Joshua Wong says he won’t be at the front lines because he is on bail and due in court with HKFS’s Lester Shum on Jan. 15.

– Meanwhile, new student group Student Front has criticized the two leading student groups for being passive about the police clearing, and has declared that they will resist the police with “defensive” tactics and gear for as long as they can hold out.

Student Front, a group that chooses to remain leaderless, wrote in a Facebook post that they don’t want the “Umbrella Revolution” to end without securing the Umbrella Movement’s aims of genuine universal suffrage for the 2017 Hong Kong Chief Executive elections.

– In Admiralty, the crowd are putting up banners and street art declaring: “We will be back.”

A yellow banner reading "We'll be back" is displayed by protesters at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
A yellow banner reading “We’ll be back” is displayed by protesters at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

 

A man walks past protesters' tents on a main road at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
A man walks past protesters’ tents on a main road at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

– A number of university deans, chancellors, and professors say they will be on the ground in academic regalia to observe the clearing. Some pan-democrats have also announced that they will be stationed near the PLA complex overnight while awaiting the start of the clearance.

– In a new poll by the University of Hong Kong, the People’s Liberation Army Hong Kong garrison is more popular than the Hong Kong police force. An earlier poll reveals that public support for the police reached an all-time low of 29 percent.

– In a separate poll by the University of Hong Kong, of the 514 surveyed, 31.3 percent support the student occupation, up 3 percent from the past poll. 49.3 percent are against.

As for the government’s handling of the protests, 37 percent are in favor while 46 percent are opposed.

“Our survey shows that those who support the students or the government are both minorities,” said Robert Chung, director of the Public Opinion Program, according to Wall Street Journal. “To overcome this lose-lose situation, both sides must exercise restraint, try to understand, tolerate and not agitate each other, in order to resolve the problem in a civilized and rational way”

Day Seventy-three

Tuesday, Dec. 9

Pro-democracy protesters' tents are seen at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Pro-democracy protesters’ tents are seen at the occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

– Police officially announce the clearing of Admiralty site as per a high court injunction on Thursday, 9:00 a.m.

Assistant police commissioner Cheung Tak-keung said that police will remove obstacles in Admiralty outside areas stated in the injunction, which means that the whole of “Umbrella Square” could be cleared.

Civil servants received notices that they won’t need to work at Central Government offices on Thursday.

– The final Scholarism member on hunger strike, Gloria Cheng, ended her fast after 142 hours.

In total, five Scholarism members including leader Joshua Wong took part in the hunger strike to pressure the Hong Kong government to restart dialogues on democratic reform with students.

– Associate Professor Chan Kin-man, one of Occupy Central with Love and Peace’s co-founders, says that he will step back from social activism after the Umbrella protests and focus on writing, Ming Pao reports.

Prof. Chan adds that the protests have exceeded all their expectations.

– Embattled Hong Kong Chief Executive CY Leung is trying to sway some pan-democratic lawmakers to support political reforms proposed by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPCSC). Leung needs a two-thirds majoring in the Legislative Council to go ahead with the reforms.

– “Blue Ribbon” anti-Umbrella Movement protesters staged an anti-Shopping Revolution rally in Mong Kok.

Day Seventy-two

Monday, Dec. 8

People sit on a wall as they listen to a speaker at the movement's main protest site in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on December 6, 2014. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)
People sit on a wall as they listen to a speaker at the movement’s main protest site in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on December 6, 2014. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

– Hong Kong’s high court granted an injunction to All China Express Ltd bus company to clear a part of the Admiralty main protest site.

Police could move in on Thursday, with about 3,000 officers, the South China Morning Post reports. Hong Kong Chinese language media puts the number at 7,000 officers.

– Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying rejects students’ calls to restart the political reform consultation process in Hong Kong, and says that there will be further announcements on when the Admiralty and Causeway Bay sites will be cleared.

– Joshua Wong, Scholarism’s leader, says that his group would facilitate secondary school and elderly people leaving the protest site ahead of police clearance. Wong also urged protesters to defend themselves only and not throw objects at the police.

In addition, Scholarism’s Oscar Lai announced that the protesters will remove some barricades from the areas stated in the injunction themselves.

– A new student group, Student Front, has been formed. They vow to remain at the protest sites and hold their ground with nonviolent means.

In a speech tonight, Student Front says that they won’t initiate attacks and are an organization for action. They aim to take on higher-risk activities, and won’t ask people to join them in activities that initiates attacks.

 

Here are their four rules:

1) No initiating of attacks

2) Student Front is organized for action, and will target higher-risk activities

3) No convener. Core members and volunteers only.

4) Student Front won’t call upon people to do activities that break Rule 1.

As for the Admiralty clearance, students intend to use shields.

– In an interview with the South China Morning Post, pan-democratic legislator Fernando Cheung says that protesters could respond to increased police violence with more violence.

– Police did, however, release a statement today stating that they will restrain from using batons, and even if they use them, will only hit protesters’ legs and not their head.

– Chinese Ambassador to the United Kingdom Liu Xiaoming says that the banning of the Foreign Affairs Committee from entering Hong Kong has to do with China’s sovereignty rather than an insult.

– There is only one hunger striker, Gloria Cheng, left. She has had an energy drink.

 

The other hunger striker, Eddie Ng dropped out after 120 hours.

– The online petition to the UN Human Rights Council regarding police violence has passed the 100,000 mark.

Day Seventy-one

Sunday, Dec. 7

 

Demonstrators speak to a police officer in a march against police brutality during the pro-democracy protests, in the Wan Chai district of Hong Kong on December 7, 2014. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators speak to a police officer in a march against police brutality during the pro-democracy protests, in the Wan Chai district of Hong Kong on December 7, 2014. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

– About 2,000 “Umbrella Parents” marched to the Hong Kong Police HQ at Wan Chai to protest police brutality towards the students.

The demonstrators made three demands:

1) The Hong Kong government and police must take responsibility for the excessive violence used against citizens and apologize.

2) An independent committee with civilian representatives should be set up to investigate illegal police conduct during the protests.

3) The Hong Kong government should immediately respond to Hong Kong citizen’s demands for democracy and start a dialogue with students and residents.

– Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying rejects students’ demands to restart the political reform consultation process, which would overturn the framework set by Beijing earlier this year.

Leung expects violence and “furious resistance” when police move in to clear the Admiralty and Causeway Bay sites, most likely on Wednesday.

– Meanwhile, Ming Pao estimates that 7,000 police officers will be involved in the clearing on Wednesday.

– According to the South China Morning Post, the police have received a substantial sum of money for a special fund to help police officers who have been affected by the Umbrella protests. Police have not publicly announced the fund.

– I.T. sector lawmaker Charles Mok warns the government that if they continue ignoring the younger generation, it will only hasten their own demise.

– 7 people volunteered to go on 28 hour hunger strikes.