Gordon Brown Resigns, David Cameron Takes Over

May 11, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Prime Minister Gordon Brown speaks about the current state of government and announces that he will step down as Labor Party's leader on May 10 in London, England.  (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Prime Minister Gordon Brown speaks about the current state of government and announces that he will step down as Labor Party's leader on May 10 in London, England. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Gordon Brown has resigned as U.K. prime minister, and David Cameron has been sworn in by the Queen of England to replace him on Tuesday evening. The abrupt shift is an outcome of Gordon Brown's failure to secure a power-sharing deal in the political wranglings that followed the inconclusive election last week.

Brown’s resignation effectively ensures that David Cameron would become prime minister.

Following the constitutional form, Gordon Brown said he would recommend to the queen that opposition leader David Cameron be invited to form the next government. He headed to the palace immediately after his speech, and Cameron was sworn in as the new U.K. prime minister shortly afterward.

The power shift came as the Liberal Democrat and Tory parties were putting the final touches to a power-sharing deal.

David Cameron announced that there would be a "proper coalition between his Tory Party and the Liberal Democrats.

"This is the right way for the strong, stable, and decent government that we need so badly," he said.

Cameron also said that he and the Liberal Democrats' leader Nick Clegg "want to put aside party differences for the sake of the national interest."

"I love this country and think its best days lie ahead," he enthused.

Yesterday, Gordon Brown had offered his resignation in return for a deal with the Liberal Democrats that was needed to keep his party in power, setting into motion talks between the two parties.

When these talks failed to produce a workable deal today, the game was over for the Labor Party’s hopes of retaining power.

Brown's young sons joined him and his wife Sarah as he gave a brief, emotional speech in Downing Street—his home for the last 13 years.

As prime minister, he said, he had been privileged to learn very much about the best of and the frailties of human nature, not least of all his own.

Brown said that he "loved the [prime minister's] job" and that it had been "a privilege to serve."

"I wish the next prime minister well as he makes the important choices for the future," he said.

Brown has told friends he plans to resign as a member of parliament and leave politics, sources have said to the Press Association.

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