Estes Park Flooding: Rocky Mountain National Park Still Closed, Flood Threat Over (+Photos)

By Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.
September 14, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

The flooding appears to be over in Estes Park, Colorado.

After days of rain or forecasts of possible rain, Tuesday is finally clear.

Residents and business owners are working on clearing the debris and muck from structures and roads to put the city back together.

Flooding started at Estes Park, a town at the entry point to Rocky Mountain National Park, on Friday. 

Rocky Mountain National Park is still closed on Tuesday.

Most of the 1,500 homes that were destroyed and the 4,500 that were damaged in the area were either in Estes Park or Lyons.

However, many businesses opened on Tuesday, including Caring Pregnancy Center, Crossfit of Estes Park, and Estes Park Brewery.

At the same time, the Estes Park Trail-Gazette reported on Monday that Estes Park could remain isolated for months.

The main roads into and out of town–State Highways 36 and 36–will remain closed indefinitely and residents are restricted to Trail Ridge Road through Rocky Mountain National Park and the narrow State Highway 7.

“We want to rebuild roads as fast as possible, make them better and for the best cost we can,” said Eric Brown, spokesman for Gov. John Hickenlooper. “It’s too early to know how the rebuilding will be prioritized. We want to restore full access to Estes Park and other communities impacted by the flooding as quickly as possible.”

People outside the town are being asked not to come into town at this point.

Phone service started working again on Tuesday in Estes Park.

Estes Park School buildings opened weekdays starting Monday to care for and feed children. Students “are not required to attend but the schools want to be available as a resource. Buses will not run.”

Some properties along Fish Creek will continue to be without water until that can be restored.

Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.