Chinese International Vocal Competition Winners Crowned

August 22, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015
Soprano Tan Sinsim sings at 2010 NTDTV Chinese International Vocal Competition semifinal on Saturday, Aug. 21. She received the $10,000 gold award in the competition's female division. (Edward Dai/The Epoch Times)
Soprano Tan Sinsim sings at 2010 NTDTV Chinese International Vocal Competition semifinal on Saturday, Aug. 21. She received the $10,000 gold award in the competition's female division. (Edward Dai/The Epoch Times)

NEW YORK—This weekend concluded the final round of the fourth annual NTDTV Chinese International Vocal Competition, the largest competition of its kind.

The gold awards—at $10,000 each—went to New York’s soprano Tan Sinsim in the female division and Canada’s Huan Xing in the male division. Soprano Cheng I-Chun from Taiwan and tenor Tian Ge from New York received silver awards at $3,000 each. Sopranos Yi Zhen from Taiwan and Lin Wenyu from Argentina, bass Li Qiu, and tenor Jian Chong-Yuan received bronze awards at $1,000 each.

Since Friday, nearly 40 elite Chinese vocalists from four continents showcased their talents at the three-day competition at John Jay College’s Gerald W. Lynch Theater in New York.

“New York is the cultural crossroads of the world,” said Lan Yeliu, one of the five judges on the panel, at a press conference on Saturday following the semifinal. “Hosting the Chinese International Vocal Competition here enabled us to attract contestants from places such as Brazil, Argentina, Germany, Taiwan, and Japan.”

In its fourth year, the competition is said to be a world-class competition that reflects the overall level of Chinese bel canto vocalists around the world and offers a platform to improve as a whole.

“I think singing is all about bringing forward the best side of you,” said Tan, the gold award recipient. She sang Caro Nome from Verdi’s Rigoletto and the Chinese song Northeast Lullaby at the final.

“Not only do you have to present your skills and aptitude, but also your soul, feelings, and personal understanding—your view of the art itself,” said Tan, who started singing at 9. “If you are using music as a means to vie for some kind of achievement, then the song that you sing would not touch the hearts of the audience.”

The sopranos, mezzo-sopranos, tenors, and basses were required to sing Chinese classics, as well as Western opera arias such as Der Hölle Rache from Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, Che Gelida Manina from Puccini’s La Bohème, and Di Provenza il Mar from Verdi’s La Traviata.

The competition is part of a nine-competition series held by global Chinese network New Tang Dynasty Television (NTDTV). Other competitions include martial arts, oil painting, photography, violin, Han couture design, piano, culinary, and dance.

 

Female Division

Gold:

Tan Sinsim, soprano

Silver:
Cheng I-Chun, soprano

Bronze:
Lin Wenyu, soprano
Yi Zhen, soprano

Honorable Mentions:
Chou Ting-Huei, soprano
Kao Yung-Yi, soprano
Natasha Kung, soprano
Lu Ren-Hui, soprano
Shirley Wang, soprano
Xia Danyu, mezzo-soprano
Guezel Zakir, soprano

Male Division

Gold:

Huan Xing, tenor

Silver:
Tian Ge, tenor

Bronze:
Li Qiu, bass
Jian Chong-Yuan, tenor

Honorable Mentions:
Chang Yao-Chun, tenor
Shen Jun-Ching, tenor