Boston—A Bike Friendly City Grows More Friendly

By Steve Gigliotti
Steve Gigliotti
Steve Gigliotti
August 18, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Boston: One of the many Hubway stations located in the city of Boston. The hi-tech solar powered stations allow members to swipe their cards, take a bike and commute to their destinations.  (Steve Gigliotti/Epoch Times)
Boston: One of the many Hubway stations located in the city of Boston. The hi-tech solar powered stations allow members to swipe their cards, take a bike and commute to their destinations. (Steve Gigliotti/Epoch Times)
BOSTON—A short trip around Boston will show what a bike city it is. Cycling has become a subculture of many who use this green alternative for their daily commute. This week, the League of American Bicyclists recognized Boston’s Mayor Thomas Menino and the city of Boston with the Silver Bicycle Friendly Community Award. It was the first time Boston has received the honor.

“I am proud to accept this honor on behalf of Boston as this important award signifies how far we have come in our transformation into a world-class bicycling city,” Menino said. “With the recent launch of the Hubway bike share system, we are well on our way to reaching the next level. I would also like to thank and recognize our green business leaders who have helped make our city more bicycle-friendly, from installing outside bike racks to participating in Hub on Wheels and Bike Fridays. Making Boston more welcoming to cyclists is definitely a collaborative effort.”

The new launch of the Hubway system puts the city on the map for cycling. The Hubway is a bicycle share program where members for an annual fee of $85.00 or $5.00 a day can hop on and off the city’s shared bicycles as many times as they want for 30 minute intervals. With 40 stations in almost every part of the city and growing, commuters can grab a bike 24 hours a day to commute quickly to their destination and leave the bike at the end of the trip.

Mark Driscoll, a Boston resident called the Hubway, “The greatest thing that’s happened to the city of Boston." He said that since its launch, the Hubway has saved him taxi money and time. For $5.00 he hopped on and off bikes all day from lunch at South Station, to his haircut in the North End and then back to the West End. He said, “Boston is learning to become a bike friendly city and bicycle riders are learning to appreciate Boston at the same time.”

To make biking easier, the city has also published bicycling maps and installed more than 1,500 bicycling parking spots in the past three years, installing them daily. Residents can easily request a spot to be installed by contacting the mayor’s office.

“If anyone can transform Boston into a premier bike friendly city it’s Mayor Menino,” Sen. John Kerry said in a press release. “Bike sharing is an environmentally friendly way to reduce traffic congestion.”

For more information on bicycling in the city of Boston, programs and events visit: http://www.cityofboston.gov/bikes/

Steve Gigliotti
Steve Gigliotti