12th Person Rescued From Thai Cave on Third Day of Operation

July 10, 2018 Last Updated: July 10, 2018

CHIANG RAI, Thailand—A twelfth person was rescued on Tuesday from a flooded Thai cave complex where 12 boys and their soccer coach were trapped for more than two weeks, a Reuters witness said, apparently leaving just one more to be brought out to safety.

The perilous mission to save the “Wild Boars” soccer team and their coach has gripped the world for days.

A Reuters witness saw four people being carried out of the Tham Luang cave on stretchers separately on Tuesday, the third day of the rescue operation.

Eight of the boys were brought out on stretchers over the first two days—four on Sunday and four on Monday.

Officials have not been commenting on the rescue mission as it has been taking place, so it was not clear who had been brought out on Tuesday or what condition they were in.

But a person with knowledge of the rescue said just before the twelfth person was spotted, that in all, 11 of the 13 had been brought out.

Rescue personnel prepare the transport for the evacuation of the boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave, in the northern province of Chiang Rai, Thailand, July 10, 2018 in this photo obtained from social media. (Facebook/Police Thailand News/via Reuters)

The head of the operation, Narongsak Osottanakorn, said earlier the final operation would be “more challenging” because one more survivor would be brought out, along with three Navy SEALs who have been accompanying them.

The rescuers have been learning from experience and were two hours faster in bringing the second batch of survivors out on Monday.

However, scattered monsoon rains continued to risk percolating through the limestone cave walls to flood the tunnels with fast-flowing water.

“I hope today we will be faster or the same speed as yesterday,” Narongsak said.

A crack team of foreign divers and Thai Navy SEALS has been guiding the boys out through nearly 4 km (2.5 miles) of sometimes submerged, pitch-dark channels.

Rescue personnel are seen during preparations for transport for the evacuation of the boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave, in the northern province of Chiang Rai, Thailand, July 10, 2018 in this photo obtained from social media. (Facebook/Police Thailand News/via Reuters)

The youngsters and their coach got trapped on June 23 when they set out to explore the vast cave complex after soccer practice, when a rainy season downpour flooded the tunnels.

British divers found the 13, huddled on a muddy bank in a partly flooded chamber several kilometers inside the complex, on Monday last week.

The eight boys brought out on Sunday and Monday were in good health overall and some asked for chocolate bread for breakfast, officials said.

Two of the boys had suspected lung infections but the four boys from the first group rescued were all walking around their hospital beds.

They are still being quarantined from their parents because of the risk of infection and would likely be kept in hospital for a week to undergo tests, officials said.

Rescue personnel prepare the transport for the evacuation of the boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave, in the northern province of Chiang Rai, Thailand, July 10, 2018 in this photo obtained from social media. (Facebook/Police Thai News/via Reuters)

Four more of the boys were carried on stretchers out of the labyrinthine Tham Luang cave on the Myanmar border at dusk on Monday, bringing to eight the number brought out after two rescue pushes on successive days.

People across Thailand, and the world, have cheered the rescue operation, including at the Mae Sai Prasitsart school where six of the trapped boys are students.

Technology billionaire Elon Musk went into the cave on Monday and left the rescue team with a “kid-sized” submarine his company SpaceX had built, Thailand’s interior Minister Anupong Paochinda said.

Musk said on Twitter, “Just returned from Cave 3. Mini-sub is ready if needed. It is made of rocket parts & named Wild Boar after kids’ soccer team. Leaving here in case it may be useful in the future.”

By John Geddie and Panu Wongcha-um