Science

New Method Could Help Estimate Time of Death for a 10-Day-Old Corpse

In this file image an Israeli forensic expert attaches an ID tag to the bodybag of a sheep herder killed in an explosion near the southern Israeli kibbutz Nahal Oz. (David Furst/AFP/Getty Images)
In this file image an Israeli forensic expert attaches an ID tag to the bodybag of a sheep herder killed in an explosion near the southern Israeli kibbutz Nahal Oz. (David Furst/AFP/Getty Images)

In any murder investigation, one of the most crucial questions is when the victim died. Accurately pinning down the time of death helps forensic teams...


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    Are Flood Levels in U.S. Midwest 5 Feet Too Low?

    Federal agencies may be underestimating historic 100-year flood levels on rivers in the Midwestern United States by as much as 5 feet, a new study... Read more

  • There’s only one of them. (Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)

    If Everyone Lived in an ‘Ecovillage’, the Earth Would Still Be in Trouble

    We are used to hearing that if everyone lived in the same way as North Americans or Australians, we would need four or five planet... Read more

  • "This is one of the planet's last, relatively intact, large marine ecosystems. It is unusual in this respect, and thus provides a suite of globally significant conservation benefits and scientific insights," says Andrew Clarke. (cefish by Uwe kils via Wikimedia Commons)

    Antarctic Life Is Weirder Than You’d Think

    Recent investigations have shown the continent and surrounding ocean are rich in species, which are also very highly diversified into a variety of distinct ecological... Read more

  • "This bi-functional catalyst can split water continuously for more than a week with a steady input of just 1.5 volts of electricity. That's an unprecedented water-splitting efficiency of 82 percent at room temperature," says Haotian Wang. (Bong Grit/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

    Low-Cost Water Splitter Makes Hydrogen for 200 Hours

    A new water-splitting device can continuously generate hydrogen and oxygen for more than 200 hours—and requires only one catalyst. The device, described in Nature Communications,... Read more

  • 4682879772_690ba00bb5_z

    US Forced to Import Corn and Soy to Meet GMO-Free Demand

    In the U.S. a shocking 88 percent of corn and 94 percent of soybeans are genetically modified. In order to ensure that your corn and... Read more

  • Malaysia Palm Oil

    Efforts to Produce Palm Oil Sustainably Are Actually Profitable for Businesses, Study Finds

    Palm oil is used to make many of the products we commonly use and consume: margarine, ice cream, lipstick, shampoo, washing detergent—just to name a... Read more

  • Urgenda Foundation director Marjan Minnesma hugs lawyer Roger Cox, left, after a Dutch court ordered the government to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 in a groundbreaking climate case that activists hope will set a worldwide precedent in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, June 24, 2015. (AP/Peter Dejong)

    Dutch Court Orders Carbon Emissions Cuts to Protect Citizens

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands—In a sweeping victory for Dutch environmental activists that could have global repercussions, a court ordered the government Wednesday to cut the country’s... Read more

  • How to trim agriculture’s global warming footprint? (Neil Howard, CC BY-NC 2.0)

    The Ground Exhales: Reducing Agriculture’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    The overwhelming scientific consensus is that gases produced by human activity are affecting global climate. But even if you don’t believe the current warming of... Read more

  • "Our study shows that 15 years of warmer and drier winters are creating a direct loss of native wildflowers in some of California's grasslands," says Susan Harrison. (Peter Kemmer/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

    Dry Winters Threaten California Wildflowers

    Native wildflowers in California are losing species diversity after multiple years of drier winters, according to a new study. The findings provide the first direct... Read more

  • 80 percent of the crop pollination from wild bees was provided by just 2 percent of wild bee species. That means that the economic benefit of crop pollination might not be a good argument for conserving wild bee species, according to the researchers. (Patrick_K59/CC BY 2.0)

    Claims About Crops Won’t Save Wild Bees

    As wild bee diversity declines worldwide at unprecedented rates, 58 bee researchers call for conservation action—and not just for the species that pollinate our crops... Read more

  • "We believe that the choice is being driven because it's inconsistent with one's image as a green person if you actively say no to a good cause, such as helping to mitigate climate change," says Sebastian Lotz. "While it is relatively easy to find excuses for not actively choosing green energy, it is harder to find a reason to actively negate a personally important belief." (Floris Oosterveld/CC BY 2.0)

    Green Energy Is More Popular If It’s the Default

    Convincing people to buy into green, renewable energy plans could be as simple as making it their default option, a new study suggests. The economists—Sebastian... Read more

  • People shop for tomatoes at Union Square Market in New York, NY, on Oct. 20, 2014. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Local Farming Can Feed Most of America, Says New Study

    Farmers markets and farm-to-table restaurants are all the rage today. Food made from locally grown produce is considered more sustainable for the environment, and for... Read more

  • INDUSTRIAL_JUNK-PILE_NEAR_COLORADO_RIVER_FROM_THE_UNION_CARBIDE_URANIUM_MILL._THE_PLANT_IS_TO_BE_CLOSED_DOWN_IN_THE..._-_NARA_-_543762

    These Bacteria Leave Dangerous Uranium ‘Immobile’

    A strain of bacteria that “breathes” uranium may be key to cleaning up polluted groundwater at sites where uranium ore was processed to make nuclear... Read more

  • "It would be a major victory if slightly more often people would talk about the health effects, or at least try to imagine, the health-related risks involved with climate change," says Sean Valles. (AndreAnita/iStock)

    Save the Polar Bears? Save the Humans

    Climate change is about more than melting ice caps and images of the Earth on fire, says Sean Valles, assistant professor in Michigan State University’s... Read more

  • A woman unloads grocery at her home on March 23, 2015. (Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images)

    Americans Are More Bothered With Leaving the Lights on Than Wasting Food, Study Says

    About 31 percent of the total food supply in the United States goes to waste, but most American consumers are unaware of how much food... Read more

  • INDONESIA-HEALTH-ENVIRONMENT-POLLUTION

    Indonesia at Risk From Huge Fires Because of El Niño

    In 1997-98, extremely dry El Niño conditions in Indonesia kicked off a wave of large–scale uncontrolled burning, destroying about five million hectares of tropical forest... Read more

  • (Youtube)

    Crying Babies Are Latest to Demand China Fix Its Smog Problem (Video)

    In recent years, China’s epic smog problem has caused officials in Beijing to put up billboards of a fake sun because the real one was no longer visible... Read more

  • A sign shows the price in Euros for a breakfast menu in a restaurant on the La Barceloneta beach on June 22, 2011 in Barcelona, Spain. (David Ramos/Getty Images)

    Why Are People in the Mediterranean Moving Away From the Mediterranean Diet?

    The Mediterranean diet is prized for its nutritional value and health benefits. Since a 1970 study conducted by American scientist Ancel Keys found reduced rates... Read more

  • Chinese children help carry bottled drinking water back to their homes in Qinglong, in southwest China's Yunnan province on April 4, 2010. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

    Bottled Water Is a Trend in US, China, and India—but for Different Reasons

    A new report by the market research firm Canadean Research Ltd. projects that global bottled water consumption will overtake carbonated beverage consumption for the first... Read more

  • A Chinese votive sword found in Georgia, USA. (Courtesy of the Indigenous Peoples Research Foundation)

    Chinese Sword Found in Georgia Suggests Pre-Columbian Chinese Travel to North America?

    In July 2014, an avocational surface collector chanced across a partially exposed Chinese votive sword behind roots in an eroded bank of a small stream... Read more

  • Left: Portrait of Peder Jensen Winstrup, 1750. (Wikimedia Commons) Right: The coffin of Peder Winstrup, which was found to contain a fetus. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: (ClaudioVentrella/iStock)

    What Is a Fetus Doing Inside the Coffin of a 17th Century Mummified Bishop? (+Video)

    Researchers at Lund University hospital were in for a surprise when they conducted a CT scan of a mummified Scandinavian bishop, and spotted the remains... Read more

  • A file photo of rock-cut tombs in the ancient Greek city of Myra. (Demre/iStock)

    Ancient Greeks Apparently Feared Zombies so Much They Weighed Down the Dead

    It isn’t only modern society that has become fascinated by the undead. Ancient Greeks on the island of Sicily had a fear of revenants so... Read more

  • Left: A painting of Cleopatra by John William Waterhouse, 1888. Right: "Death of Antony," by Jean Germain Drouais, 18th century. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A file photo of pyramids in Egypt. (Redhouane/iStock)

    An Ancient Mystery: Searching for the Lost Tomb of Antony and Cleopatra

    Mark Antony and Cleopatra are among the most famous pairs of lovers from the ancient world.  Following their defeat at the Battle of Actium in... Read more

  • A face found on a cliff face in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve's Broken Group Islands in British Columbia, Canada. (Parks Canada/Tanya Dowdall)

    Mysterious, Giant Face Found on Cliff in Canada—Man-Made or Natural?

    Parks Canada is trying to figure out how a face, estimated to be about 7 feet tall, appeared on a cliff in a remote region... Read more

  • A team sanctioned by the Italian government has located the remains of a well-preserved 2,000-year old Roman shipwreck carrying a load of terracotta roof tiles. (AOL Screenshot)

    2,000-Year Old Roman Shipwreck Found Near Sardinia (Video)

    The bottom of the sea contains many remnants from the past, and one piece of the history it holds has recently been located. A Roman... Read more

  • Fossils of Four Legged Fish Found in Arctic Back in Canada and On Display

    OTTAWA—A 375-million-year-old fossil of a primitive fish that also sports features of the first four-limbed creatures is now in the hands of the Canadian Museum... Read more

  • Almendres Cromlech, Guadalupe, Evora, Portugal (Nekkas/Wikimedia Commons)

    Legends Say Mysterious Women Built the Megaliths of Portugal

    Prehistoric Europeans told legends about powerful, mysterious females who made European stone tombs called dolmens and cromlechs. On the one hand, they were said to... Read more

  • Left: Illustration of Bronze-Age warriors. (Mike Bishop/Flickr*) Background: Map of Europe (Mstroz/iStock)

    Most European Men Are Descended From Just 3 Bronze-Age Warlords, New Study Reveals

    The majority of European men are descended from just a few Bronze Age male ancestors, says a genetic study published in the journal Nature Communications on... Read more

  • Left: The oldest crown in the world, found in the Nahal Mishmar Hoard. (Hanay/Wikimedia Commons) Background: The Dead Sea (Xta11/Wikimedia Commons)

    The 6,000-Year-Old Crown Found in a Dead Sea Cave

    The oldest known crown in the world, which was famously discovered in 1961 as part of the Nahal Mishmar Hoard, along with numerous other treasured... Read more

  • Round natural pearls are rarely found in nature. So when archaeologists uncovered a 2000-year-old near-round pearl on the north Kimberly coast of Western Australia, they described it as 'irreplaceable.' (AOL Screenshot)

    Archaeologists Uncover Rare 2,000-Year-Old Pearl (Video)

    Round natural pearls are rarely found in nature. So when archaeologists from the University of Wollongong (UOW) and the University of New England (UNE) uncovered... Read more

  • Left: The Zoroastrian Ateshgah “Fire Temple” near Baku, Azerbaijan. The temple was built over natural burning vents which no longer provide gas, and so the flame is now artificially fed via a pipe. (Nick Taylor/Flickr*) Background: "The Door to Hell" gas deposit, nearby Derweze, Turkmenistan, has been burning since 1971. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Eternal Flames: Geologists Investigate Ancient Myths to Know More About Modern Fuel

    Millennia ago, ancient cultures were astounded by the seeming miracle of natural flames which burned day and night for weeks, decades, or even centuries. The... Read more

  • An excerpt from an 18th century record of a find that seemed to date human civilization as much, much older than previously thought. A file photo of limestone. (Achim Prill/iStock; edited by Epoch Times)

    Out of Place in Time: Petrified Wooden Tools Buried Deep in Limestone

    Oopart (out of place artifact) is a term applied to dozens of prehistoric objects found in various places around the world that seem to show... Read more

  • File image of coal (Kkymek/iStock) File image of a drill (Konstik/iStock; edited by Epoch Times)

    Drill Bit Found in Coal Suggests Advanced Civilization LONG Before Humans Thought to Walk Earth?

    Oopart (out of place artifact) is a term applied to dozens of prehistoric objects found in various places around the world that seem to show... Read more

  • (Courtesy of Dr. Sam Semir Osmanagich)

    New Discovery of Prehistoric Underground Tunnels at Bosnian Pyramids

    The Bosnian Pyramids are said by some to be man-made, but the European Association of Archaeologists says they are natural formations. The Association issued a... Read more

  • The prehistoric fossilized trees in Cardigan Bay are sometimes revealed by low tides. Is this the legendary land of Cantre’r Gwaelod? (Yrhenwr/Flickr)

    Cantre’r Gwaelod: The (Mythical?) Sunken Kingdom of Wales

    The story of Atlantis is one of the most renowned and enduring tales from ancient Greece. This island, mentioned in the works of the philosopher... Read more

  • (Screenshot/Stony Brook University/YouTube)

    3.3-Million-Year-Old Stone Tools Push Back Archaeological Record by a Whopping 700,000 Years

    Archaeologists have discovered the earliest stone tools found to date. The West Turkana Archaeological Project made the announcement in a paper to be published May 21... Read more

  • Right: Gorgon (Andrea Astes/iStock) Background: Chavin de Huantar ruins in Peru, where one researcher says the mythical home of the ancient Greek Gorgon may have been. (Sharon odb/Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient Greek Legend Seems to Describe a Place in Peru: Early Contact?

    In the 8th century B.C., the Greek poet Hesiod described in his “Theogony” a place at the end of the Earth where the gorgons dwell,... Read more

  • Gold that Columbus found in the Americas seems to have come from West Africa, one indication among several that a West African expedition may have preceded him. Left: Christopher Columbus, painted by Sebastiano del Piombo, 1519. Right: Mansa Musa, a 14th century ruler of the Mali Empire as depicted in the Catalan Atlas, 1375. Background: Uruguay is highlighted on a map of South America. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Inscriptions on Uruguay Coast Suggest West Africans Beat Columbus to Americas

    Archaeoastronomer William James Veall scoured satellite images of Uruguay’s coastline, discovering a mass of inscriptions carved into the surface of a 2.3-mile (4,700-meter) long, white, crystalline rock formation... Read more

  • View of the Genghis Khan statue from the observation deck carved into the horse’s mane at Tsonjin Boldog. (Giannella M. Garrett)

    An Ancient Mystery: Where Is the Tomb of Genghis Khan?

    Recently, a magnificent find by archeologists yielded a structure lost to time, a military stronghold used by Genghis Khan and his army as they conquered... Read more


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