Science

The Last Hieroglyphic Language on Earth and an Ancient Culture Fighting to Survive

Naxi script. (Mulligan Stu/Flickr)
Naxi script. (Mulligan Stu/Flickr)

The Dongba symbols are an ancient system of pictographic glyphs created by the founder of the Bön religious tradition of Tibet and used by the...


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  • An artist's concept of Comet Siding Spring (2013 A1) and Mars. Closest approach to Mars is on October 19, 2014. (NASA, CC BY)

    Attention All Martian Satellites and Rovers – a Comet Is Coming

    As every good marketing manager knows, value for money is a major driver for the success of a product. Being a bargain is not usually... Read more

  • A pair of orphaned orangutans in Borneo. Many orangutans have become orphaned across the island due to forest loss and conflict with humans. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

    Zoo Kicks off Campaign for Orangutan Conservation

    If you see people wearing orange this October, it might not be for Halloween, but for orangutans. Chester Zoo‘s conservation campaign, Go Orange for Orangutans, kicks off... Read more

  • Sept. 15, 2014, file photo  shows beach goers cooling off during the Southern California heat wave,  in Huntington Beach, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

    Warming Earth Heading For Hottest Year On Record

    WASHINGTON— Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That’s because global heat... Read more

  • The DRECP – What Is It?

    California’s Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP) is here! The draft environmental documents, totaling more than 8,000 pages, were posted online last Tuesday after an... Read more

  • Sky Jacobs (www.wikimedia.org.)

    A Tiny Owl with a Big Problem

    Cactus ferruginous pygmy owls could fit in the palm of your hand. These tiny birds are diurnal (that is, not nocturnal), feed on all manner of birds,... Read more

  • Treasure hunting. (Micheal Coghlan, CC BY)

    Discovering a Viking Hoard: A Day in the Life of a Metal Detectorist

    Metal detecting enthusiast Derek McLennan’s recent discovery of Viking-age artefacts at a site in Dumfries and Galloway is both spectacular and impressive. Not only did... Read more

  • Coquerel's Sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) in Madagascar. Photos by Rhett Butler.

    Governments Increase Funding to Conservation

       On the heels of a report showing that the world is far behind on targets to halve habitat loss, cut pollution, and reduce overfishing,... Read more

  • Jane Goodall. Photo by: Morten Bjarnhof/GANT.

    Jane Goodall Joins Mongabay for Conservation

         Famed primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall—whose image is known the world over—has joined the advisory board of mongabay.org. This is the non-profit branch... Read more

  • The Earth's shadow begins to fall on the moon during a total lunar eclipse, as seen above Miami, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Who Owns the Moon?

    Whether you’re into mining, energy or tourism, there are lots of reasons to explore space. Some “pioneers” even believe humanity’s survival depends on colonising celestial... Read more

  • Bill Cannon, archaeologist with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), walks by the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The human remains in these caves suggest an ancient human population reached what is now the United States at the end of the last Ice Age. (BLM/Wikimedia Commons) Background: A file photo of a glacier lake. (Shutterstock*)

    Ancient Oregon Caves May Change Understanding of Human Habitation in Americas

    A network of caves in rural Oregon, known as the Paisley caves, may contain archaeological evidence of the oldest definitively-dated human presence in North America,... Read more

  • Rice and rambutan farmers Komari, 70, and his wife Nur Bety, 60, say an adjacent coal mine has disrupted water supplies, leading to water pollution and reduced yields. Loss of local forests for new coal pits has increased insect and monkey attacks on their crops at Makroman village, near Samarinda, East Kalimantan. Photo by David Fogarty (August 2014).

    Indonesia’s Choice: Coal vs. Environment

       Indonesia cannot build power stations fast enough. And neither can most of its Asian neighbors. Rapid economic and population growth are driving equally rapid... Read more

  • The Lycurgus Cup, at the British Museum. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A concept image of nanotechnology (Kentoh/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Ancient Roman Nanotechnology Inspires Next-Generation Holograms for Information Storage

    The Lycurgus Cup, as it is known due to its depiction of a scene involving King Lycurgus of Thrace, is a 1,600-year-old jade green Roman... Read more

  • An artist’s concept of Comet Siding Spring (2013 A1) and Mars. (NASA)

    Comet Siding Spring’s Close Encounter With Mars Draws Near

    Astronomers world-wide are gearing up for what NASA calls a “once in a lifetime” event: the Comet Siding Spring will swing past Mars on its... Read more

  • Meteors streak outwards from the top of Orion’s head as seen in 2012 from central Victoria. (Phil Hart)

    WATCH: One of the Year’s Best Meteor Showers, Thanks to Halley’s Comet

    As Earth orbits the sun, it continually ploughs through dust and debris left behind by passing comets and asteroids. On any night of the year,... Read more

  • The explosive eruption of Sarychev Volcano, on Russia’s Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan, seen from the International Space Station. (NASA Goddard/Flickr, CC BY)

    Under the Volcano: Predicting Eruptions and Coping With Ash Rain

    Living alongside active volcanoes in places like Japan, the Philippines and especially Indonesia can be uncomfortable. Around half a billion people in the world live... Read more

  • A sample of the atomically thin material molybdenum disulfide. (Rob Felt)

    Atomically Thin Material Generates Electricity

    Engineers have demonstrated that a single atomic layer of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) can generate an electrical voltage when it’s stretched or compressed. The effect is... Read more

  • The Lycurgus Cup, at the British Museum. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A concept image of nanotechnology (Kentoh/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Ancient Roman Nanotechnology Inspires Next-Generation Holograms for Information Storage

    The Lycurgus Cup, as it is known due to its depiction of a scene involving King Lycurgus of Thrace, is a 1,600-year-old jade green Roman... Read more

  • A sample of the atomically thin material molybdenum disulfide. (Rob Felt)

    Atomically Thin Material Generates Electricity

    Engineers have demonstrated that a single atomic layer of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) can generate an electrical voltage when it’s stretched or compressed. The effect is... Read more

  • The current prototype is the size of the head of a ballpoint pen. Researchers hope to design a next-generation implant one-tenth that size. The goal is to produce smaller devices that could be used to create a network of electrodes to study the brains of experimental animals in ways not currently possible. (Arbabian Lab/Stanford School of Engineering)

    Ultrasound Powers Devices Deep Inside the Body

    Researchers would like to place very small implants deep inside our bodies to monitor health or treat pain. But providing electric power to implants without... Read more

  • An illustration of the ebola virus. (Bumbasor/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Are Some People Immune to Ebola?

    Experts say Ebola might be quietly inoculating a significant portion of the population—people who are exposed to the virus but never succumb to it or... Read more

  • "We're not surprised delay discounting appears in the realm of parental decision-making," says Nathan Call. "Clinicians know this is a problem. But I think if we can measure it, we can possibly predict it or change it." (Jonny Hughes/Flickr)

    Why Parents Give Up on Changing Kids’ Behavior

    People tend to focus on the short term, and care more about potential benefits that are available immediately. Psychologists and economists call this tendency for... Read more

  • (Dimitar_hr/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Scientists Find 18 New Viruses on NYC Rats

    The rats scurrying around New York City are carrying a number of pathogens that could be dangerous to humans, including life-threatening gastroenteritis. “New Yorkers are... Read more

  • Compact Fusion Reactor

    Lockheed Breakthrough: Nuclear-Fusion Reactors Tiny Enough to Power Aircraft

    Lockheed Martin announced Wednesday that it has made a breakthrough in developing a nuclear fusion reactor that measures only about 7 feet by 10 feet, that’s... Read more

  • A frame from the 1965 program premiere of “Lost in Space” shows the Robinson family in suspended animation. (CBS Television/Wikimedia Commons) Background: Ice (Shutterstock*); an illustration of a planet (Enrico Giuseppe Agostoni/iStock/Thinkstock)

    If People in Suspended Animation Are ‘Dead,’ Sticky Legal Issues Could Arise

    NASA has been talking recently of plans to put astronauts in suspended animation. A hospital in Pennsylvania is poised to put some patients into suspended animation... Read more

  • This Jan. 28, 2008 file photo shows a rainbow visible looking West from Palm Springs, Calif. next to an array of wind turbines. (AP Photo/Sandy Huffaker,File)

    Desertec Desert Solar Project Comes Unraveled

    BERLIN—It sounded like a good idea: build massive solar energy plants in the deserts of North Africa and the Middle East to supply Europe with... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Scientists Explain Why Nobody Puts Cheddar on Pizza

    The water molecules contained in the cheese atop the pizza heat up. In fairly short order, the water begins to boil. When that happens, the... Read more

  • "We may be able to use novae as a 'testbed' for improving our understanding of this critical stage of binary evolution," says Laura Chomiuk. Above, yellow depicts the material that is expelled just days after the stellar explosion. (Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF)

    Gamma Rays Pour Out of Exploding Star

    A new discovery offers clues to the creation and origin of gamma rays, the highest-energy form of radioactive waves known in the universe. Using highly... Read more

  • Who doesn’t want more brain power? (Shutterstock*)

    Zapping the Brain With Tiny Magnetic Pulses Improves Memory

    The practice of physically stimulating the brain in order to alleviate symptoms of illness and injury has been around since the early 20th century. For... Read more

  • "If anything, the rhetoric and actions of political leaders demonstrate that hostility directed at the opposition is acceptable, even appropriate," says Shanto Iyengar. "While Republicans view fellow partisans as patriotic, well-informed, and altruistic, Democrats are judged to exhibit precisely the opposite traits." (Daniel Lobo/Flickr)

    Do Politics Divide Americans More Than Race?

    Democrats and Republicans are increasingly split along political party lines, and new research suggests those partisan sentiments are stronger than racial biases. “We were particularly... Read more

  • Members of the Army's 101st Airborne Division conduct a training exercise at Ft. Campbell, Ky., Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. Members will travel to Liberia to build treatment centers and conduct medical training as part of the fight against the Ebola epidemic.  (AP Photo/The Courier-Journal, Stephen Lance Dennee)

    New Math Shows ‘True Scale’ of Ebola Outbreak

    A team of scientists has made new calculations about how the Ebola epidemic will develop, its scale, and perhaps how to stop it from spreading... Read more

  • PARIS, FRANCE - APRIL 23:  Anti-same sex marriage activists of the anti-gay marriage movement 'la Manif pour Tous' protest during a demonstration, a few hours after the French Parliament adopted gay marriage law at the Assemblee Nationale on April 23, 2013 in Paris, France. The bill was approved by a vote in Parliament of 331 to 225. (Photo by Antoine Antoniol/ Getty Images)

    French Gov’t Affirms Its Prohibition of Gestational Surrogacy

    PARIS–The French “La Manif pour tous” (Protest for All) movement has gathered 100,000 participants in Paris and Bordeaux on 6 October 2014. This movement, established... Read more

  • Sven Lidin, left , Staffan Nordmark, centre,  and Mans Ehrenberg at the  Royal Academy of Sciences  Wednesday Oct. 8, 2014  announce the Nobel Chemistry laureates 2014. Americans Eric Betzig and William Moerner and German scientist Stefan Hell  won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy." The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences says the work of the three scientists "has brought optical microscopy into the nanodimension." (AP Photo/Bertil Ericson)  SWEDEN

    Super-Zoom Microscopes Earn Chemistry Nobel to 2 Americans, 1 German

    STOCKHOLM—Three researchers won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for giving microscopes much sharper vision than was thought possible, letting scientists peer into living cells with... Read more

  • (Keoni Cabral, CC BY-ND 2.0)

    Those Who Know They’re Dreaming Tend to Be Savvier When Awake

    It’s probably fair to assume that at this moment, you are, in fact, awake. You’re reading; you’re scrolling. All waking activities. But let’s say, hypothetically, that... Read more

  • Projected images of  Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura  are displayed as its announced at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Tuesday Oct. 7,  2014 that  the Nobel Prize in physics goes to Akasaki, Amano and Nakamura . (AP Photo/Bertil Ericson, TT)    SWEDEN OUT

    LED Lights Earn Physics Nobel for 3 Scientists

    STOCKHOLM—Two Japanese scientists and a Japanese-born American won the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for inventing blue light-emitting diodes, a breakthrough that has spurred the development of LED technology to light up homes,... Read more

  • FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2005 file photo, Japanese inventor Shuji Nakamura, professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, ponders during a press conference in Tokyo.  Nakamura won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014.  (AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara, File)

    2 Japanese, 1 American Win Nobel Prize in Physics

    STOCKHOLM— Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura won the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for the invention of... Read more

  • The curious want to know more and can remember more. (Wagner T. Cassimiro Aranha/Flickr)

    Curiosity Changes the Brain to Boost Memory and Learning

    The more curious we are about a topic, the easier it is to remember not only information about that topic, but also other unrelated information... Read more

  • Bill Cannon, archaeologist with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), walks by the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The human remains in these caves suggest an ancient human population reached what is now the United States at the end of the last Ice Age. (BLM/Wikimedia Commons) Background: A file photo of a glacier lake. (Shutterstock*)

    Ancient Oregon Caves May Change Understanding of Human Habitation in Americas

    A network of caves in rural Oregon, known as the Paisley caves, may contain archaeological evidence of the oldest definitively-dated human presence in North America,... Read more

  • A file photo of an Egyptian mummy. (Shutterstock*)

    Archaeologists Find Egyptian Mummy With Peculiar Skull Containing Brain Imprint

    Archaeologists are trying to unravel a mystery surrounding the discovery of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian mummy whose skull contains imprints left by the brain, according to a... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*, effects added by Epoch Times)

    Visions of Dead Loved Ones Not Yet Known to Have Died

    These cases go beyond premonition or a vague intuitive feeling—the people involved reported having a clear vision of a loved one and thus learning of... Read more

  • Yamal crater in Siberia. (The Siberian Times)

    Siberian Exploding Holes Could Be Key to Bermuda Triangle: Scientists

    From The Siberian Times: The craters—two in Yamal and one on the Taymyr peninsula—were revealed during the summer, leading to urgent analysis by scientists as... Read more

  • A view of Bedford County, Va., where the supposed treasure of “The Beale Papers” is said to be buried. (Wikimedia Commons) Bottom right: Cover of “The Beale Papers” (Wikimedia Commons)

    The Lost Treasure of the Beale Ciphers

    More than a century ago, a small pamphlet was published titled “The Beale Papers,” which contained three cipher texts. The mysterious codes supposedly gave directions... Read more

  • File photo of a wooden bird  (Shutterstock*, effects added by Epoch Times)

    First Robotic Drone Created in 350 BC?

    In 350 B.C., mathematician and founding father of mechanics Archytas of Tarentum invented a wooden mechanical dove. “Archytas’ invention is often cited as the first... Read more

  • Srivatsa Geoglyphs

    Over 50 Ancient Geoglyphs, Including Swastika, Discovered in Kazakhstan

    Archaeologists are calling them the Nazca lines of Kazakhstan – more than 50 giant geoglyphs formed with earthen mounds and timber found stretched across the... Read more

  • A file photo of a Sanskrit text (Maxim Krasnov/Hemera/Thinkstock, effects added by Epoch Times); Rice (Shutterstock*); Conceptual image of the "flower of life" (Tschitscherin/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Indian Sage Who Developed Atomic Theory 2,600 Years Ago

    John Dalton (1766 – 1844), an English chemist and physicist, is the man credited today with the development of atomic theory.  However, a theory of... Read more

  • (Lixuyao/iStock/Thinkstock)

    You Have a ‘GPS’ in Your Brain, Could It Help You Find Love? Your Lost Dog?

    A Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded Monday for the discovery of “an inner GPS in the brain.” While this function of the brain affects... Read more

  • Stencils of hands in a cave in Indonesia. Ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe, according to a new study that shows our ancestors were drawing all over the world 40,000 years ago. And it hints at an even earlier dawn of creativity in modern humans than scientists had thought. (AP Photo/Kinez Riza, Nature Magazine)

    40,000-Year-Old Asian Cave Paintings Shock Archaeologists: Reconsidering History

    WASHINGTON—Ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe, according to a new study that shows our ancestors were drawing all over the world 40,000 years ago. And it... Read more

  • Right: Playwright and screenwriter Sidney Coe Howard (1891–1939), writer of “Gone With the Wind.” (Wikimedia Commons) Center: Film poster for “Gone With the Wind.” (Wikimedia Commons) Left: A file photo of a baby. (Photodisc/Photodisc/Thinkstock) Background: (Craig Aurness/Fuse/Thinkstock)

    Screenwriter of ‘Gone With the Wind’ Reincarnated in the Midwest?

    When Lee was 2 ½ years old, he started talking about his “other mommy.” When he was 3 ½, he started becoming upset because he... Read more

  • A light-bulb-like object engraved in a crypt under the Temple of Hathor in Egypt. (Lasse Jensen/Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient Egypt Illuminated by Electricity?

    Today, we take for granted nightly city skylines, streetlights, and the overall power that drives our modern convenience. But, could the wise-men of ancient Egypt... Read more

  • Dr. James Tour

    Prominent Chemist Says Scientists Don’t Really Understand Evolution

    Dr. James Tour understands microevolution, he has observed it often in the lab. But macroevolution—the evolution that, according to Darwinism, changed entire species, morphed organs, accomplished... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    How Psychologists Officially Handle Spiritual Matters: Are Believers Delusional?

    Whether someone is crazy or not can be officially determined by a manual widely used to diagnose mental illness. This psychiatrists’ “Bible” has been the subject... Read more

  • Fuenta Magna (Courtesy of Bernardo Biados's Research Team) Background: Lake Titicaca in Boliva (Shutterstock*)

    Fuente Magna, the Controversial Rosetta Stone of the Americas

    The Fuenta Magna is a large stone vessel, resembling a libation bowl, that was found in 1958 near Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. It features beautifully... Read more

  • (Bernello/Wikimedia Commons) Right: Sea serpent illustration by Hans Egede, 1734. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Icelandic Government Commission Announces Legendary Sea Monster Exists (+ Sighting Video)

    A government investigation carried out by the Fljotsdalsherao municipal council in Iceland has ruled that a legendary sea serpent named Lagarfljotsormurinn, which is rumored to... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Where’s the Proof in Science? There Is None

    UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? Those people looking for proof to... Read more

  • Top left: (Shutterstock) Bottom left: (TanyaRoss17/iStock/Thinkstock) Bottom right: A file photo of a WWI-era plane. (Shutterstock) Background: (Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Thinkstock)

    3 Out-of-Body Experiences With Some Objective Verification

    Some people who have had close brushes with death report having left the physical body to float around and observe scenes in the direct vicinity... Read more

  • "The Madonna with Saint Giovannino," painted by Domenico Ghirlandaio in the 15th century. (Wikimedia Commons)

    UFOs Invade Renaissance Art?

    The Middle Ages and Renaissance periods of Western civilization created some of the most iconic and defining works of art in recorded history. The work... Read more

  • Skeptic columnist for Scientific American Dr. Michael Shermer wrote of a personal coincidence that left him in awe involving a transistor radio that meant a lot to his wife on their wedding day. (Shutterstock*)

    3 Inspiring Coincidences That Will Give You Goosebumps

    Dr. Bernard Beitman is a founding father of Coincidence Studies. Working from the University of Virginia, he is creating definitions and methodologies for studying coincidences,... Read more

  • An artist's concept of Comet Siding Spring (2013 A1) and Mars. Closest approach to Mars is on October 19, 2014. (NASA, CC BY)

    Attention All Martian Satellites and Rovers – a Comet Is Coming

    As every good marketing manager knows, value for money is a major driver for the success of a product. Being a bargain is not usually... Read more

  • The Earth's shadow begins to fall on the moon during a total lunar eclipse, as seen above Miami, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Who Owns the Moon?

    Whether you’re into mining, energy or tourism, there are lots of reasons to explore space. Some “pioneers” even believe humanity’s survival depends on colonising celestial... Read more

  • An artist’s concept of Comet Siding Spring (2013 A1) and Mars. (NASA)

    Comet Siding Spring’s Close Encounter With Mars Draws Near

    Astronomers world-wide are gearing up for what NASA calls a “once in a lifetime” event: the Comet Siding Spring will swing past Mars on its... Read more

  • Meteors streak outwards from the top of Orion’s head as seen in 2012 from central Victoria. (Phil Hart)

    WATCH: One of the Year’s Best Meteor Showers, Thanks to Halley’s Comet

    As Earth orbits the sun, it continually ploughs through dust and debris left behind by passing comets and asteroids. On any night of the year,... Read more

  • A depiction of the Messenger spacecraft is shown viewing the Rachmaninoff basin. Both the monochrome and enhanced color views of Mercury were obtained during Messenger's third Mercury flyby. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington)

    NASA’s Messenger Spacecraft Snaps Pics of Ice on Planet Mercury

    NASA’s Messenger spacecraft has taken the first pictures of ice frozen in dark spots on Mercury, the planet closest to the sun. The probe, which... Read more

  • "Super-Earths are at the edge of what we can study right now," says Heather Knutson. "But super-Earths are a good consolation prize—they're interesting in their own right, and they give us a chance to explore new kinds of worlds with no analog in our own solar system." (NASA Blueshift/Flickr)

    We Still Have No Clue What Super-Earths Are Made Of

    Despite discovering hundreds of exoplanets known as “super-Earths,” astronomers still don’t know what they’re made of. They’re larger than Earth but smaller than Nepture, and... Read more

  • An astronomer observes the night sky for Orionid Meteors as uses a laser pointer to show a radiate at an observatory near the village of Avren east of the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2009. The annual Orionid meteor shower is promising to put on a dazzling sky show. The Orionid meteor shower occur each year as a result of Earth passing through dust released by Halley's Comet. The point from where the Orionid meteors appear to radiate is located within the constellation Orion. (AP Photo/Petar Petrov)

    Orionids Meteor Shower 2014: Peak Dates, Times, Where to Look

    The Orionids Meteor Shower is set to peak soon after starting last month. The shower, which has meteors from Halley’s comet, is slated to peak on... Read more

  • Comet Sliding Spring, also known as comet C/2013 A1, as captured by Wide Field Camera 3 on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. (NASA, ESA, and J.-Y. Li (Planetary Science Institute))

    Comet Siding Spring 2014 Update: Mars Encounter Coming This Week

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—The heavens are hosting an event this weekend that occurs once in a million years or so. A comet as hefty as a... Read more

  • In this Aug. 3, 2014 file photo taken by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is pictured from a distance of 285 kms. Scientists at the European Space Agency on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014, announced the spot where they will attempt the first landing on a comet hurtling through space at 55,000 kph (34,000 mph). The maneuver is one of the key moments in the decade-long mission to examine the comet and learn more about the origins and evolution of objects in the universe. (AP Photo/ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team, File)

    European Space Agency Confirms Time and Place of Comet Probe Landing

    BERLIN—The European Space Agency has confirmed the time and place it will attempt to land the first spacecraft on a comet. The agency said Wednesday... Read more

  • This artist’s impression of the Milky Way galaxy. The blue halo of material surrounding the galaxy indicates the expected distribution of the mysterious dark matter. (L. Calçada/ESO)

    Dark Matter and the Milky Way: More Little Than Large

    While invisible, dark matter completely dominates our Milky Way. But recent measurements of just how much dark matter there is have revealed a bit of... Read more

  • High-energy X-rays streaming from a rare and mighty pulsar (magenta), the brightest found to date, can be seen in this new image combining multi-wavelength data from three telescopes. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO/NOAO)

    Pulsar as Bright as 10 Million Suns Baffles Astronomers

    An object scientists thought was a black hole is actually the brightest and weirdest pulsar ever detected. “This compact little stellar remnant is a real... Read more

  • First foot. (NASA)

    Is Space Still Awesome?

    World Space Week is one of a series of events co-ordinated by the UN to celebrate the global nature of space exploration. It was established... Read more

  • A temperature map of exoplanet WASP-43b: The white-colored region on the daytime side is 2,800 degrees Fahrenheit. On the nighttime side, temperatures drop below 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. (ESA, J. Bean/L. Kreidberg/K. Stevenson of the University of Chicago, NASA)

    It’s Hot Enough on This Exoplanet to Melt Steel

    The most detailed weather map ever made of an exoplanet orbiting another star 260 light-years away from Earth shows a world with daytime temperatures hot... Read more

  • The brightest pulsar ever recorded has been discovered by astronomers using NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. Pulsars are also called dead stars because they are what’s left after a supernova explosion, and belong to a class called neutron stars. (AOL Screenshot)

    Brightest Dead Star Ever Discovered in the Universe (Video)

    The brightest pulsar ever recorded has been discovered by astronomers using NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. Pulsars, or dead stars, are the remnants... Read more

  • (NASA)

    Draconids Meteor Shower 2014: Where to Look in Sky, Peak Time for Giacobinids Shower

    The Draconids Meteor Shower is underway until about October 10. The meteor show is debris from the dusty tail of Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner. The peak date is actually... Read more

  • The moon is illuminated by sunlight reflected off the Earth during a total lunar eclipse, one of four so-called ‘blood moons’, on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. The first in the current tetrad of blood moons fell on Passover and the current eclipse occurs on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, the fifth day after Yom Kippur, leading some religious people to believe that it is a prophetic sign of the end times of civilization. This blood moon appears 5.3% larger than the last one on April 15 because it occurs right after the perigee, the closest point in its orbit to the Earth. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

    Blood Moon Pictures Today: Total Lunar Eclipse and Blood Moon Photos

    The last blood moon of 2014 took place on Wednesday, October 8, and lots of new pictures and photos from across the United States and... Read more

  • The moon is pictured in Mexico City on April 15, 2014 as a lunar eclipse begins across the Americas. The entire event was to be visible from North and South America. (AFP/Getty Images)

    Lunar Eclipse Dates, Peak Time: Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse Set for Wednesday

    The second total lunar eclipse of 2014 is set for Wednesday, October 8. The eclipse will begin just after 4 a.m. EDT and continue until... Read more

  • The moon is seen in the time around a total lunar eclipse on April 15, 2014 in Montevideo, Uruguay. The blood moon on October 8 will be seen across North and South America. (AFP/Getty Images)

    Blood Moon 2014 Dates, Times: Red or Orange Moon and Lunar Eclipse (Tetrad) Taking Place on October 8

    The next blood moon is coming up in 2014, and it will be visible in most of the United States.  The blood moon will happen... Read more

  • “Hi there, do you comet here often?” The ISEE-3. (NASA)

    Space, the Financial Frontier—How Citizen Scientists Took Control of a Spaceship

    The latest and perhaps most inspiring example of private space adventurism is a crowd-funded project to resurrect a decades-old NASA spacecraft purely for the engineering... Read more

  • Headlines about Pluto being a planet again are a little premature, but the public's attachment to the dwarf planet may win out in the end. (AOL Screenshot)

    Pluto Still Not a Planet, But Fans Might Be Winning Debate (Video)

    Have fans of Pluto succeeded in making it a planet again? You might have seen some headlines over the last few days saying Pluto has... Read more

  • A pair of orphaned orangutans in Borneo. Many orangutans have become orphaned across the island due to forest loss and conflict with humans. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

    Zoo Kicks off Campaign for Orangutan Conservation

    If you see people wearing orange this October, it might not be for Halloween, but for orangutans. Chester Zoo‘s conservation campaign, Go Orange for Orangutans, kicks off... Read more

  • Sept. 15, 2014, file photo  shows beach goers cooling off during the Southern California heat wave,  in Huntington Beach, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

    Warming Earth Heading For Hottest Year On Record

    WASHINGTON— Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That’s because global heat... Read more

  • The DRECP – What Is It?

    California’s Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP) is here! The draft environmental documents, totaling more than 8,000 pages, were posted online last Tuesday after an... Read more

  • Sky Jacobs (www.wikimedia.org.)

    A Tiny Owl with a Big Problem

    Cactus ferruginous pygmy owls could fit in the palm of your hand. These tiny birds are diurnal (that is, not nocturnal), feed on all manner of birds,... Read more

  • Coquerel's Sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) in Madagascar. Photos by Rhett Butler.

    Governments Increase Funding to Conservation

       On the heels of a report showing that the world is far behind on targets to halve habitat loss, cut pollution, and reduce overfishing,... Read more

  • Jane Goodall. Photo by: Morten Bjarnhof/GANT.

    Jane Goodall Joins Mongabay for Conservation

         Famed primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall—whose image is known the world over—has joined the advisory board of mongabay.org. This is the non-profit branch... Read more

  • Rice and rambutan farmers Komari, 70, and his wife Nur Bety, 60, say an adjacent coal mine has disrupted water supplies, leading to water pollution and reduced yields. Loss of local forests for new coal pits has increased insect and monkey attacks on their crops at Makroman village, near Samarinda, East Kalimantan. Photo by David Fogarty (August 2014).

    Indonesia’s Choice: Coal vs. Environment

       Indonesia cannot build power stations fast enough. And neither can most of its Asian neighbors. Rapid economic and population growth are driving equally rapid... Read more

  • The explosive eruption of Sarychev Volcano, on Russia’s Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan, seen from the International Space Station. (NASA Goddard/Flickr, CC BY)

    Under the Volcano: Predicting Eruptions and Coping With Ash Rain

    Living alongside active volcanoes in places like Japan, the Philippines and especially Indonesia can be uncomfortable. Around half a billion people in the world live... Read more

  • Illegal Logging in Para State, Brazil as revealed by Greenpeace activists. Photo by: © Greenpeace.

    Tracking Illegal Logging Trucks in the Amazon

    Every night empty trucks disappear into the Brazilian Amazon, they return laden with timber. This timber —illegally cut —makes its way to sawmills that sell... Read more

  • Amur Falcon (Alastair Rae from London, United Kingdom/www.wikimedia.org)

    Migrating Amur Falcons Arrive In India

    The early morning hubbub in Pangti village of Nagaland’s Wokha district came to a standstill when the villagers stopped to greet the first flock of... Read more

  • An injured royal bengal tiger is seen inside an enclosure set up by park rangers at Kashara in Chitwan National Park, some 200kms southwest of Kathmandu, on December 27, 2011. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

    New Royal Bengal Tiger Project in India Launched

    India is one of last remaining abodes of the majestic Royal Bengal Tiger. Only 1706 of this big cat survive in India which means there... Read more

  • The "Thank you tree", designed by Swedish artist Lasse Åberg, represents a number of trees planted in Africa, and is meant to replace cut flowers as a gift to performers. (Courtesy of Vi Agroforestry)

    ‘Thank You Tree’ Contributes to a Better Environment, and Fights Poverty

    STOCKHOLM—A Swedish aid organization has developed a re-usable work of art, in order to replace the flower bouqets frequently given to actors and artists after... Read more

  • Image courtesy orrissadiary

    New Species of Wolf Snake Discovered in India

    India gets a new species of snake and the state of Odisha lends its name to this new snake! In a delightful news for snake... Read more

  • A giant river otter with a fish in its mouth. Photo by: Frank Hajek.

    Peru River Otters Recovering but Still Threatened

    Lobo de río, or river wolf, is the very evocative Spanish name for one of the Amazon’s most spectacular mammals: the giant river otter (Pteronura brasiliensis). This... Read more

  • Fires in the Tripa peat swamp. Photo courtesy of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme

    Indonesia Palm Oil Company Appeals to Supreme Court

    Oil palm company PT. Kallista Alam has filed an appeal with the Supreme Court continuing the closely-watched legal battle set to redefine Indonesia’s commitment to... Read more

  • Oil palm promotional poster along the highway near Lengpui airport. Photo courtesy of TR Shankar Raman.

    India Plans Huge Palm Oil Expansion, Forests At Risk

         Palm oil, a ubiquitous ingredient in supermarket products ranging from shampoos and cosmetics to processed foods, comes at a huge environmental cost. Between... Read more

  • Recent deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Alexander Lees of the Goeldi Museum.

    Small Farmers Play Big Role in Deforestation

       Smallholder properties account for a rising proportion of overall deforestation in Brazilian Amazon, suggesting that Brazil’s progress in cutting forest loss through stricter law... Read more

  • Eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei) are listed as Endangered by the IUCN and are dependent on forests. Two subspecies exist. The eastern lowland gorilla (G. b. graueri) is the most populous, estimated at 5,000 individuals in the DRC as of a 2010 report by the UN Environment Programme. The other, the mountain gorilla (G. b. beringei, pictured), is thought to number only 700 individuals, which range over small regions of the DRC, Uganda, and Rwanda. Photo by Rhett A. Bulter

    Examining Forest Restoration Commitments

       The United Nations Climate Summit at the end of September saw a host of governments, agencies and organizations rally around an international agreement aimed... Read more

  • U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, talks to an army soldier as Colombia's Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon, second right, watches, at the Tolemaida military base, in Melgar, Colombia, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Hagel is on a six-day, three-country trip to South America. Hagel will also travel to Chile and Peru, where he will attend a conference of defense ministers from the Americas. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Hagel: Climate Change Will Challenge US Military

    AREQUIPA, Peru— Rising sea levels and other effects of climate change will pose major challenges for America’s military, including more and worse natural disasters and... Read more

  • Steven Amstrup with a pair of polar bears during a research expedition. Photo courtesy of Steven Amstrup/Polar Bears International.

    Polar Bears Threatened in Arctic By Greenhouse Gases

         In 1773, an expedition headed by Constantine John Phipps, the Second Baron Mulgrave, embarked on a dangerous journey North—to see how far they... Read more

  • Treasure hunting. (Micheal Coghlan, CC BY)

    Discovering a Viking Hoard: A Day in the Life of a Metal Detectorist

    Metal detecting enthusiast Derek McLennan’s recent discovery of Viking-age artefacts at a site in Dumfries and Galloway is both spectacular and impressive. Not only did... Read more

  • Bill Cannon, archaeologist with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), walks by the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The human remains in these caves suggest an ancient human population reached what is now the United States at the end of the last Ice Age. (BLM/Wikimedia Commons) Background: A file photo of a glacier lake. (Shutterstock*)

    Ancient Oregon Caves May Change Understanding of Human Habitation in Americas

    A network of caves in rural Oregon, known as the Paisley caves, may contain archaeological evidence of the oldest definitively-dated human presence in North America,... Read more

  • The Lycurgus Cup, at the British Museum. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A concept image of nanotechnology (Kentoh/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Ancient Roman Nanotechnology Inspires Next-Generation Holograms for Information Storage

    The Lycurgus Cup, as it is known due to its depiction of a scene involving King Lycurgus of Thrace, is a 1,600-year-old jade green Roman... Read more

  • A lot has changed since people first started skiing, which is evident in what archaeologists believe to be a 13 hundred year old medieval ski that has been found in a national park in Norway. (AOL Screenshot)

    1,300 Year-Old Ski Found in Norway (Video)

    Modern skis are high tech sports gear made to be light and easily maneuverable. A lot has changed since people first started skiing, which is... Read more

  • File photo of a wooden bird  (Shutterstock*, effects added by Epoch Times)

    First Robotic Drone Created in 350 BC?

    In 350 B.C., mathematician and founding father of mechanics Archytas of Tarentum invented a wooden mechanical dove. “Archytas’ invention is often cited as the first... Read more

  • Srivatsa Geoglyphs

    Over 50 Ancient Geoglyphs, Including Swastika, Discovered in Kazakhstan

    Archaeologists are calling them the Nazca lines of Kazakhstan – more than 50 giant geoglyphs formed with earthen mounds and timber found stretched across the... Read more

  • Conceptual image of medieval lovers holding hands (Kanwarjit Singh Boparai/iStock/Thinkstock) Background: File photo of a medieval tomb (Commoner28th/iStock/Thinkstock)

    2 Ancient Skeletons Found Holding Hands in Medieval Chapel

    Archaeologists have discovered two skeletons holding hands at an ancient site of pilgrimage, in the newly-discovered Chapel of St Morrell in Leicestershire England. According to... Read more

  • A file photo of a Sanskrit text (Maxim Krasnov/Hemera/Thinkstock, effects added by Epoch Times); Rice (Shutterstock*); Conceptual image of the "flower of life" (Tschitscherin/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Indian Sage Who Developed Atomic Theory 2,600 Years Ago

    John Dalton (1766 – 1844), an English chemist and physicist, is the man credited today with the development of atomic theory.  However, a theory of... Read more

  • Researchers have found prehistoric cave paintings on Sulawesi Island, Indonesia that might be even older than those found in Europe. (AOL Screenshot)

    Some of the Earliest Cave Paintings Discovered in Indonesia (Video)

    Researchers have found prehistoric cave paintings on Sulawesi Island, Indonesia that might be even older than those found in Europe. Archaeologist Alistair Pike from the... Read more

  • Stencils of hands in a cave in Indonesia. Ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe, according to a new study that shows our ancestors were drawing all over the world 40,000 years ago. And it hints at an even earlier dawn of creativity in modern humans than scientists had thought. (AP Photo/Kinez Riza, Nature Magazine)

    40,000-Year-Old Asian Cave Paintings Shock Archaeologists: Reconsidering History

    WASHINGTON—Ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe, according to a new study that shows our ancestors were drawing all over the world 40,000 years ago. And it... Read more

  • Christopher Columbus and his ship, the Santa Maria. (Wikimedia Commons)

    UNESCO Report: Wreck Off Haiti Not ‘Santa Maria’

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti— The U.N. cultural agency has determined that a shipwreck off northern Haiti is not the Santa Maria, the lost flagship of Christopher Columbus... Read more

  • A light-bulb-like object engraved in a crypt under the Temple of Hathor in Egypt. (Lasse Jensen/Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient Egypt Illuminated by Electricity?

    Today, we take for granted nightly city skylines, streetlights, and the overall power that drives our modern convenience. But, could the wise-men of ancient Egypt... Read more

  • Fuenta Magna (Courtesy of Bernardo Biados's Research Team) Background: Lake Titicaca in Boliva (Shutterstock*)

    Fuente Magna, the Controversial Rosetta Stone of the Americas

    The Fuenta Magna is a large stone vessel, resembling a libation bowl, that was found in 1958 near Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. It features beautifully... Read more

  • The character of Count Dracula, the vampire from Bram Stoker’s novel, was named after the historical figure of Wallachian Prince Vlad III the Impaler, who was also known by the nickname Dracula. Researchers think they have found the dungeon where Dracula was held as a prisoner during the 15th century. (AOL Screenshot)

    Researchers Claim To Have Found Dracula’s Dungeon (Video)

    The character of Count Dracula, the vampire from Bram Stoker’s novel, was named after the historical figure of Wallachian Prince Vlad III the Impaler, who... Read more

  • Main image: Map of China. (Shutterstock*); Left: Photo of an ancient Chinese bronze sword,  similar to the one found at Laozhoulin River in Gaoyou County, China. (Shutterstock*)

    3,000-Year-Old Bronze Sword Discovered in China

    An 11-year-old boy was washing his hands in the Laozhoulin River in Gaoyou County, China, when he felt something hard and metallic. He pulled out... Read more

  • Vlad Tepes

    Archaeologists Believe They’ve Found Dungeons That Held ‘Dracula’

    Archaeologists in Turkey have uncovered a secret tunnel, storage rooms, a military shelter, and two dungeons during restoration work on Tokat Castle, where Vlad III... Read more

  • Left: A file photo of holy water. (Shutterstock*) Top: Heron, a.k.a Hero of Alexandria (Wikimedia Commons) Right: An illustration of an ancient Greek beacon device (image of jar by Didecs/iStock/Thinkstock) Background: Cogs (Shutterstock*; effects added by Epoch Times)

    3 Crazy Ancient Inventions: You’ll Be Surprised What the First Vending Machine Gave Out

    1. Coin-Operated Holy Water Dispenser The first vending machine, invented in the 1st century A.D. by Heron (a.k.a. Hero of Alexandria), worked sort of like... Read more

  • Underwater exploration of the  original foundations of Pavlopetri. (Screenshot/The University of Nottingham/Youtube)

    The 5,000-Year-Old Sunken City in Southern Greece

    In the Peloponnesus region of southern Greece there is a small village called Pavlopetri, where a nearby ancient city dating back 5,000 years resides. However,... Read more

  • Detail from an ancient Venetian golden mosaic showing three Egyptian Arabs in Alexandria. (Shutterstock*)

    1,000-Year-Old Middle Eastern Recipe Book Claims to Have Ultimate Hangover Cure

    Written nearly a thousand years ago, the Kitab al-tabikh (book of cookery) written by Ibn Sayyar al-Warraq, is the most comprehensive work of its kind... Read more

  • Negev Petroglyphs

    Similar Petroglyphs in Israel, America Reveal Ancient Global Language?

    In Israel’s Negev desert and in the American Southwest similar petroglyphs have been found, according to archaeologist Dr. James Harris at Brigham Young University. It’s a... Read more


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