Science

China on Schedule for Launch This Year of 2nd Space Station

A man holds a child as they visit a park with replicas of foreign and domestic space vehicles displayed in Beijing, China, on June 26, 2016. China on Sunday recovered an experimental probe launched aboard a new generation rocket, marking another milestone in its increasingly ambitious space program that envisions a mission to Mars by the end of the decade. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
A man holds a child as they visit a park with replicas of foreign and domestic space vehicles displayed in Beijing, China, on June 26, 2016. China on Sunday recovered an experimental probe launched aboard a new generation rocket, marking another milestone in its increasingly ambitious space program that envisions a mission to Mars by the end of the decade. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

BEIJING—China on Sunday recovered an experimental probe launched aboard a new generation rocket, marking another milestone in its increasingly ambitious space program that envisions a...


  • A Chameleon extends its tongue and catches a cricket during feeding time at the Melbourne Museum. Scientists have found that sticky mucus on the chameleon’s fleshy projectile helps it hold on to its prey. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

    Slip of the Tongue: Chameleon’s Sticky Secret Revealed

    A stunningly efficient hunter, the chameleon relies on an impressive biological arsenal that includes colour-changing camouflage, panoramic vision, and lots of patience.  And then there’s... Read more

  • A fracking application has been approved in Malton, England, yet opponents of fracking  warn against its environmental impacts. Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same time, said scientists on June 21st, 2016. (Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)

    Scientists Moot ‘Green Fracking’ Technique

    Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same... Read more

  • British astronaut Tim Peake returned from the International Space Station on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft on June 18th, 2016. (ROLF VENNENBERND/AFP/Getty Images)

    Returned Astronaut Tim Peake Relishes the Little Things

    Using a normal toilet and appreciating weather – “any weather whatsoever” – are some of the small pleasures astronaut Tim Peake has enjoyed most since... Read more

  • Italian composer and pianist Ludovico Einaudi in a historic concert in the Arctic in collaboration with Greenpeace. 
(Via Ludovico Einaudi/YouTube)

    Video: Breathtaking Performance by Italian Pianist as He Floats Among Crumbling Arctic Glacier

    An acclaimed Italian pianist and composer performed a stunning concert, while floating in the Arctic surrounded by falling glaciers. Ludovico Einaudi, along with his grand piano, were... Read more

  • (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltec via Getty Images)

    Did Asteroid Crash Cause Earth’s Rarest Structure?

    Scientists have only found two quasicrystals on Earth. These super rare crystal-like solids have supposedly impossible symmetries. New experiments could explain why they’re so rare:... Read more

  • (Nina Aldin Thune/Creative Commons)

    Report: Great Pyramid of Giza Leans Ever So Slightly

    The Tower of Pisa isn’t the only world monument that leans. The west side of the Great Pyramid of Giza—and one of the Seven Wonders... Read more

  • The Great Pyramid of Giza. (Nina/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA)

    Egyptian Pharaohs First Put Houses on a Grid

    Egyptian pharaohs, who are remembered for their pyramids and temples, were also the world’s first urban planners. New research offers additional insights into how the... Read more

  • A man surf paddles near a beach as sun sets in Bridgetown, Barbados, on March 12, 2014. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

    Small Tropical Islands Could Become the World’s First 100% Renewable Nations

    We’ve heard a lot about urgent climate action from “world leaders” in developed countries, yet actual concrete achievements have been limited. The rich world may... Read more

  • A group of scientists has detected oxygen which could be from the early stages of the universe. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Detect Oxygen in Galaxy 13.1 Billion Light Years from Earth (Video)

    A group of scientists has detected oxygen which could be from the early stages of the universe. According to a press release issued by the Kavli... Read more

  • (Orla/Shutterstock)

    Retired Police Detective Identifies Mysterious Patterns Across Thousands of Missing Persons Cases

    TORONTO—David Paulides, who has more than 20 years’ experience in law enforcement, has analyzed missing persons cases across North America and has found some startling... Read more

  • The Soyuz TMA-19M capsule carrying NASA's Tim Kopra, European Space Agency's Tim Peake, and Roscosmos' Yuri Malenchenko descends beneath a parachute near the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on June 18, 2016. (Shamil Zhumatov/AP)

    3 International Space Station Astronauts Land in Kazakhstan

    MOSCOW—An International Space Station crew including an American, a Briton and a Russian landed safely Saturday in the sun-drenched steppes of Kazakhstan. The Soyuz TMA-19M... Read more

  • (Mathias Appel/Flickr)

    Why Having a ‘Bird Brain’ Is Actually Awesome

    The macaw has a brain the size of an unshelled walnut and the macaque monkey has one about the size of a lemon. Nevertheless, the... Read more

  • In 1901, divers exploring off the coast of Greece came upon a vast sunken treasure, and amidst the many fabulous objects was an item that continues to intrigue many to this day. Called the Antikythera Mechanism, the 2,100-year-old artifact is a mind-bending assembly of moving parts. (AOL Screenshot)

    World’s Oldest Computer May Have Been Built to Predict Future (Video)

    At the dawn of 1900s, divers exploring off the coast of Greece came upon a vast sunken treasure, and amidst the many fabulous objects was... Read more

  • Juno Spacecraft (via NASA.gov)

    Video: NASA Releases Dramatic Trailer for Jupiter Exploration, ‘Biggest, Baddest Planet’

    “It’s unforgiving. It’s relentless. It’s spinning around so fast, its gravity is like a giant slingshot, slinging rocks, dust, electrons, whole comets—anything that gets close... Read more

  • (Pathdoc/Shutterstock)

    Study Measures Intuition, Shows It Can Boost Accuracy of Decision-Making

    Intuition can help people make decisions more quickly, accurately, and confidently, according to a study by researchers at the University of New South Wales, published... Read more

  • (Damian Evans/Cambodian Archaeological Lidar Initiative)

    Meet Lidar: The Amazing Laser Technology That’s Helping Archaeologists Discover Lost Cities

    Archaeologists have discovered several medieval cities, buried beneath the forest floor in Cambodia: the largest is said to rival the modern Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh,... Read more

  • A Chameleon extends its tongue and catches a cricket during feeding time at the Melbourne Museum. Scientists have found that sticky mucus on the chameleon’s fleshy projectile helps it hold on to its prey. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

    Slip of the Tongue: Chameleon’s Sticky Secret Revealed

    A stunningly efficient hunter, the chameleon relies on an impressive biological arsenal that includes colour-changing camouflage, panoramic vision, and lots of patience.  And then there’s... Read more

  • A fracking application has been approved in Malton, England, yet opponents of fracking  warn against its environmental impacts. Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same time, said scientists on June 21st, 2016. (Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)

    Scientists Moot ‘Green Fracking’ Technique

    Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same... Read more

  • (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltec via Getty Images)

    Did Asteroid Crash Cause Earth’s Rarest Structure?

    Scientists have only found two quasicrystals on Earth. These super rare crystal-like solids have supposedly impossible symmetries. New experiments could explain why they’re so rare:... Read more

  • (Nina Aldin Thune/Creative Commons)

    Report: Great Pyramid of Giza Leans Ever So Slightly

    The Tower of Pisa isn’t the only world monument that leans. The west side of the Great Pyramid of Giza—and one of the Seven Wonders... Read more

  • (Mathias Appel/Flickr)

    Why Having a ‘Bird Brain’ Is Actually Awesome

    The macaw has a brain the size of an unshelled walnut and the macaque monkey has one about the size of a lemon. Nevertheless, the... Read more

  • Juno Spacecraft (via NASA.gov)

    Video: NASA Releases Dramatic Trailer for Jupiter Exploration, ‘Biggest, Baddest Planet’

    “It’s unforgiving. It’s relentless. It’s spinning around so fast, its gravity is like a giant slingshot, slinging rocks, dust, electrons, whole comets—anything that gets close... Read more

  • A 2,000-year-old, 22-pound hunk of butter found recently in a bog in Drakerath, Ireland is still believed to be edible. (AOL Screenshot)

    2,000-Year-Old Edible Butter Found In Ireland (Video)

    Before refrigerators became a regular household appliance, people had to find inventive ways to keep their dairy products fresh. Throwing the delicate edibles into bogs... Read more

  • A tropical fish can tell one human face from another despite lacking a brain section that humans and ‘smart’ animals use for this task.  (Emily Irving-Swift/AFP/Getty Images)

    ‘Smart’ Tropical Fish Can Recognise Human Faces

    A tropical fish can tell one human face from another despite lacking a brain section that Homo Sapiens and other “smart” animals use for this... Read more

  • A Hubble Space Telescope image of the galaxy UGC 9391, one of the galaxies in the new survey. (NASA, ESA, and A. Riess [STScI/JHU])

    Universe Expanding Faster Than Expected

    Astronomers have obtained the most precise measurement yet of how fast the universe is expanding, and it doesn’t agree with predictions based on other data... Read more

  • This illustration released by the Centers for Disease Control depicts a three-dimensional (3D) computer-generated image of a group of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteria. The artistic recreation was based upon scanning electron micrographic imagery. A potentially deadly "superbug" resistant to antibiotics infected seven patients, including two who died, and more than 100 others were exposed at a Southern California hospital through contaminated medical instruments, UCLA reported Wednesday Feb. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Centers for Disease Control)

    Superbug Resistant to All Antibiotics Seen in US for First Time

    A woman in Pennsylvania has tested positive for a strain of E. coli that is resistant to antibiotics, researchers said on May 26. The 49-year-old... Read more

  • Left: 5,000-year-old funnel for beer-making. (Courtesy of Jiajing Wang/PNAS); Right: Residues from the interior surface of one of the 5,000-year-old funnels for beer-making. (PNAS)

    Chinese Made ‘Sweet and Sour’ Beer 5,000 Years Ago

    Ancient Chinese brewed beer 5,000 years ago using similar technology that we use today. The beer was made of broomcorn millet, barley, Job’s tears, and tubers fermented together... Read more

  • 01230123000a1

    20,000 Bees Chase Car Around for Days After Queen Bee Gets Trapped Inside

    Around 20,000 bees chased down their queen bee after it got trapped inside a car in Pembrokeshire. Eek! pic.twitter.com/oW0FEhNUG0 — Fly FM (@Fly_FM) May 24,... Read more

  • Older, rougher and thicker Antarctic sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea in Oct. 2007, within the sea ice shield surrounding Antarctica. The ice in this region is approximately 33 feet (10 meters) thick.

    NASA: Antarctic Sea Ice Is Increasing and Arctic Ice Is Melting—Here’s Why

    The ice in Antarctica is increasing while ice in the Arctic is decreasing, a study by NASA and NOAA released on May 20 says. The... Read more

  • (YouTube)

    2020 Olympics Could Feature Man-Made Shooting Stars

    Tokyo’s 2020 opening ceremony may be a unique entertainment spectacular.  Japanese start-up company ALE Co., Ltd. would like to create a man-made meteor shower for the opening ceremony of the 2020... Read more

  • 91391328a8a888

    Canadian Hunter Shoots and Kills ‘Grolar’ or ‘Pizzly’ Bear

    A hunter in Canada spotted what he at first thought was a fox or a small polar bear. It turned out to be much more... Read more

  • Via Youtube.

    Video: Police Dashcam Shows Incredible Meteor Fireball in New England

    A dashcam from Maine’s Portland Police Department shows a meteor lighting up a night sky in New England on May 17. “You never know what... Read more

  • 3291239a0a001203aaaaaa

    Young Woman Finds Living Sand Dollar, and It’s a Bit Unexpected

    A young woman found a living sand dollar and recorded it. The clip went viral again this week. The video, as the uploader notes, shows... Read more

  • Dr. William Campbell (R) works one-on-one with a Drew University undergraduate student on real-world, scientific research as part of Drews Research Institute for Scientist Emeriti (RISE Program), through which senior scientists work directly with students in the lab. (Bill Denison/Drew University via Getty Images)

    The Philosophy of Chemistry—and What It Can Tell Us About Life, the Universe, and Everything

    Philosophy asks some fundamental and probing questions of itself. What is it? Why do we do it? What can it achieve? As a starting point,... Read more

  • A clock at the Orsay Museum in Paris, France, on April 19, 2016. The clock of the Orsay Museum is one of the few remnants of the days when the museum was a station. (Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

    A Brief History of Telling Time

    We live in a world where time is all important. Nanoseconds mark the difference between success or failure to make an electronic transaction and where... Read more

  • Some rather interesting ancient discoveries have been made in the waters near Caesarea, Israel over the years. However, none in the last few decades is comparable to a recent find made by two amateur underwater explorers. (AOL Screenshot)

    Israeli Divers Find 1,600-Year-Old Roman Treasure (Video)

    Some rather interesting ancient discoveries have been made in the waters near Caesarea, Israel over the years. However, none in the last few decades is... Read more

  • (Orla/Shutterstock)

    Retired Police Detective Identifies Mysterious Patterns Across Thousands of Missing Persons Cases

    TORONTO—David Paulides, who has more than 20 years’ experience in law enforcement, has analyzed missing persons cases across North America and has found some startling... Read more

  • (Pathdoc/Shutterstock)

    Study Measures Intuition, Shows It Can Boost Accuracy of Decision-Making

    Intuition can help people make decisions more quickly, accurately, and confidently, according to a study by researchers at the University of New South Wales, published... Read more

  • A bright star-forming ring that surrounds the heart of barred spiral galaxy NGC 1097 in this file photo. (NASA)

    Astronomers Say Advanced Alien Civilizations Have Existed

    Astronomers Adam Frank and Woodruff Sullivan, at the University of Rochester and the University of Washington respectively, published a paper in the May issue of... Read more

  • A large boulder, known as Krishna's Butter Ball, in Mahabalipuram, India. (Viswa2625/CC BY-SA)

    250-Ton Boulder Seems to Defy Laws of Physics

    The Krishna Butter Ball is a large boulder located in Mahabalipuram, a town in the Kancheepuram district in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. ... Read more

  • (PHOTOCREO/Michal Bednarek/Shutterstock)

    Evidence Accumulates for Ancient Transoceanic Voyages, Says Geographer

    Theories on the fringe of science sometimes slowly work their way into the core as the evidence accumulates. “A classic example is the continental drift... Read more

  • A reflected-light image of the controversial Bat Creek Stone. (Scott Wolter/CC BY-SA)

    Ancient Travels to the Americas or a Modern Forgery? Who Made the Bat Creek Inscription?

    The Bat Creek Stone was discovered in a small mound near Knoxville, Tenn., in 1889. It is a small stone tablet engraved with several mysterious... Read more

  • (Beata Ratuszniak/Unsplash.com/Public Domain)

    What Role Does Pattern-Seeking Play in Perceiving Coincidences?

    Coincidences emerge in the minds of the beholders. Without a human mind to detect them, most coincidences would not exist. Cognitive processing errors serve for... Read more

  • (agsandrew/iStock)

    Quantum Mechanics Has Reached Limit, Says Stanford Scientist Who Offers Alternative

    The present framework of quantum mechanics has reached its limit, said Professor Emeritus Dr. William Tiller of Stanford University’s department of materials science, in a... Read more

  • Dr. Gary Schwartz (Courtesy of Dr. Gary Schwartz) Background: (Shane Perry/Unsplash.com/Public Domain)

    How a Former Yale Professor Turned to Spiritual Science

    Gary Schwartz was raised without faith and steeped in science, but emerged a spiritual man. “I was raised to be an orthodox agnostic,” he said. He... Read more

  • An elves palace in Reykjavik. Since the beginning of time, elves have been the stuff of legend in Iceland, but locals will earnestly tell you that elves appear regularly to those who know how to see them. (Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images)

    Anthropologist Convinced Elves Live Alongside Regular People in Iceland

    Since the beginning of time, elves have been the stuff of legend in Iceland, but locals here will earnestly tell you that elves appear regularly... Read more

  • cave

    Discovery of 176,500-Year-Old Human Structures in Cave Confound Scientists

    An incredible discovery may change everything we thought we knew about ancient humans.  The Bruniquel Cave, located in southwestern France, was discovered in 1990. Inside, 1,100 feet... Read more

  • Standing stones in Avebury, Whiltshire, England. (CC BY)

    They’re Alive! Megalithic Sites Are More Than Just Stone?

    It doesn’t take much to stimulate the human body’s electro-magnetic circuitry; a small change in the local environment is enough.  People who visit ancient temples... Read more

  • (Spectral-Design/iStock)

    Cambridge Science Historian Contemplates Place of Parapsychology

    Materialism and psychical research are often viewed as antithetical. But psychic phenomena and the occult have been with us all throughout our development of science,... Read more

  • (Devanath/319 Images/Public Domain)

    Accounts of People Who Seem to Literally Be From Parallel Universes

    Over the past couple of centuries, some people have purportedly turned up who say they are from cities and countries that don’t exist. They speak... Read more

  • (photog/shutterstock)

    The Most Common Kinds of Coincidences

    There’s not a lot of great data out there on what kinds of coincidences happen to people, mostly because the stories are often so singular... Read more

  • A few of thousands of mysterious so-called "Ica Stones" in Ica, Peru. (Brattarb/CC BY-SA)

    Mysterious Stones in Ica, Peru, Evidence of Advanced Prehistoric Civilization?

    As I think back over my three years on the road, biking with my husband and children from Alaska to Argentina, there were a lot of... Read more

  • (Photos.com)

    Woman Has Spiritual Near-Death Experience, Cancer Cured as Result?

    On Feb. 2, 2006, Anita Moorjani lay in the intensive care unit of a hospital in her home city of Hong Kong. She was in... Read more

  • (Samuel Zeller/Unsplash.com)

    Even If Ghosts Are Imaginary, Their ‘Presence’ Suggests Something Strange at Work

    A research group led by Dr. A.R.G. Owen in Toronto, Canada, in the early 1970s created a “ghost.” Owen (1919–2003) was a Cambridge-educated mathematician and... Read more

  • Father Carlos Crespi Croci, a Salesian monk in Ecuador, with strange artifacts he acquired. (Ancient-Origins.net)

    The Truth About Father Crespi’s Controversial Missing Artifacts

    CUENCA, Ecuador—The story of the late Father Carlos Crespi Croci is one of mystery and controversy, including purported evidence of unknown civilizations, strange golden artifacts, a subterranean... Read more

  • (Texas A&M Health Science Center)

    What Causes Déjà Vu?

    You walk into a room and suddenly your brain goes fuzzy with an overwhelming wave of familiarity—although this is a totally new experience. Like something... Read more

  • British astronaut Tim Peake returned from the International Space Station on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft on June 18th, 2016. (ROLF VENNENBERND/AFP/Getty Images)

    Returned Astronaut Tim Peake Relishes the Little Things

    Using a normal toilet and appreciating weather – “any weather whatsoever” – are some of the small pleasures astronaut Tim Peake has enjoyed most since... Read more

  • A group of scientists has detected oxygen which could be from the early stages of the universe. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Detect Oxygen in Galaxy 13.1 Billion Light Years from Earth (Video)

    A group of scientists has detected oxygen which could be from the early stages of the universe. According to a press release issued by the Kavli... Read more

  • The Soyuz TMA-19M capsule carrying NASA's Tim Kopra, European Space Agency's Tim Peake, and Roscosmos' Yuri Malenchenko descends beneath a parachute near the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on June 18, 2016. (Shamil Zhumatov/AP)

    3 International Space Station Astronauts Land in Kazakhstan

    MOSCOW—An International Space Station crew including an American, a Briton and a Russian landed safely Saturday in the sun-drenched steppes of Kazakhstan. The Soyuz TMA-19M... Read more

  • Juno Spacecraft (via NASA.gov)

    Video: NASA Releases Dramatic Trailer for Jupiter Exploration, ‘Biggest, Baddest Planet’

    “It’s unforgiving. It’s relentless. It’s spinning around so fast, its gravity is like a giant slingshot, slinging rocks, dust, electrons, whole comets—anything that gets close... Read more

  • A bright star-forming ring that surrounds the heart of barred spiral galaxy NGC 1097 in this file photo. (NASA)

    Astronomers Say Advanced Alien Civilizations Have Existed

    Astronomers Adam Frank and Woodruff Sullivan, at the University of Rochester and the University of Washington respectively, published a paper in the May issue of... Read more

  • An artist's impression of the LISA pathfinder, a probe to observe gravitational waves from space, launched by the European Space Agency on December 3rd, 2015. Scientists are pleased with early results so far.  (ESA via Getty Images)

    Space Feat Opens ‘New Window’ Onto Universe

    A ground-breaking physics mission has opened up space as the next frontier for exploring a ubiquitous, invisible force predicted by Albert Einstein a century ago,... Read more

  • A Hubble Space Telescope image of the galaxy UGC 9391, one of the galaxies in the new survey. (NASA, ESA, and A. Riess [STScI/JHU])

    Universe Expanding Faster Than Expected

    Astronomers have obtained the most precise measurement yet of how fast the universe is expanding, and it doesn’t agree with predictions based on other data... Read more

  • Scientists with NASA’s New Horizons mission have assembled this highest-resolution color view of one of two potential cryovolcanoes spotted on the surface of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft in July 2015. (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

    Photos: Never Before Seen Closeup of Pluto’s Surface Captured by Spacecraft

    Our concept of the planet Pluto is no longer merely fantastical. NASA’s New Horizon probe passed by the dwarf planet nearly a year ago on July 14,... Read more

  • Artist's impression of Planet Nine as an ice giant eclipsing the central Milky Way, with a star-like Sun in the distance. (Tomruen, nagualdesign; background taken from File:ESO , CC BY-SA)

    A Stolen Exoplanet That Will Kill Us All? Here’s What We Do Know About ‘Planet Nine’

    Ever since a study suggested that a “Planet Nine” could be lurking in the outskirts of our solar system, astronomers have been busy trying to... Read more

  • While working on her bachelor’s degree in physics and astronomy, Michelle Kunimoto found four previously unknown planets. (AOL Screenshot)

    Canadian College Student Finds Four Previously Unknown Planets (Video)

    College is often a time of great personal and scholarly discovery, and that is particularly true of a recent graduate at the University of British... Read more

  • (NASA Ames | JPL-Caltech | T. Pyle)

    Earth-Like Planet Kepler 62F ‘Could Be Habitable,’ Researchers Say

    An Earth-like planet 1,200 light years away “could be habitable,” researchers have said. According to new computer simulations, Kepler 62f might be able to sustain... Read more

  • #FoundThem ? (NASA)

    How to Tell the World You’ve Discovered an Alien Civilisation

    After countless fictional scenarios of humans making contact with alien civilisations, you’d think we’d be prepared for actually discovering one. But finding intelligent life beyond... Read more

  • Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr. saluting the US flag on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo 11 lunar mission.  (NASA/AFP/Getty Images)

    US Flags on the Moon Have All Faded to White

    One of the qualities of ultra-violet light is that it causes colors to fade.  The UV-rays are especially harsh on the moon, which lacks the... Read more

  • (YouTube)

    2020 Olympics Could Feature Man-Made Shooting Stars

    Tokyo’s 2020 opening ceremony may be a unique entertainment spectacular.  Japanese start-up company ALE Co., Ltd. would like to create a man-made meteor shower for the opening ceremony of the 2020... Read more

  • Windy black hole. (Gabriel Pérez, SMM, IAC)

    How We Caught a Black Hole Emitting Intense Wind

    Modern science is more about patience and persistence than about great epiphanies. It is therefore extremely satisfying when you make a breakthrough, as it means... Read more

  • "When a star ages and brightens, the habitable zone moves outward and you're basically giving a second wind to a planetary system," says Ramses M. Ramirez. (NASA)

    Aging Stars Could Host Earth-Like Planets in Outer Regions

    The “habitable zone” is the region around a star in which water on a planet’s surface is liquid and signs of life can be remotely... Read more

  • Artist rendition of MMS spacecraft. (NASA)

    ‘Magnetopause’ Mission to Help Predict Space Storms

    Physicists may better predict “space weather”—magnetic storms high above Earth that threaten satellites and terrestrial power grids—thanks to new findings from NASA’s orbiting Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. “Space... Read more

  • ESA’s Swarm constellation reveals new rapid changes of our magnetic field, tied directly to the heart of our planet’s molten iron core. (ESA/ATG Medialab)

    Earth’s Magnetic Heartbeat, a Thinner Past and New Alien Worlds

    Space research never stops and it seems neither do the surprises. On ABC Breakfast News I covered some huge results from the last few weeks... Read more

  • (NASA/USGS via Marc Van Norden/CC BY 2.0)

    Scientists Detect Oxygen on Mars for First Time in 40 Years

    Space agencies have discovered oxygen in Mars’s atmosphere—an event which has not occurred since the 1970s.  The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has detected... Read more

  • This is Kepler's field of view superimposed on the night sky. (Carter Roberts/NASA)

    NASA’s Kepler Discovers 1,284 New Planets, 9 Potentially Habitable

    NASA’s Kepler space telescope discovered 1,284 new planets, doubling its planet haul thus far. Nine of them are about the size of Earth, or slightly larger, and orbit... Read more

  • A fracking application has been approved in Malton, England, yet opponents of fracking  warn against its environmental impacts. Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same time, said scientists on June 21st, 2016. (Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)

    Scientists Moot ‘Green Fracking’ Technique

    Adding CO2 instead of water to the cocktail used in fracking could boost oil and gas extraction and help fight global warming at the same... Read more

  • Italian composer and pianist Ludovico Einaudi in a historic concert in the Arctic in collaboration with Greenpeace. 
(Via Ludovico Einaudi/YouTube)

    Video: Breathtaking Performance by Italian Pianist as He Floats Among Crumbling Arctic Glacier

    An acclaimed Italian pianist and composer performed a stunning concert, while floating in the Arctic surrounded by falling glaciers. Ludovico Einaudi, along with his grand piano, were... Read more

  • A man surf paddles near a beach as sun sets in Bridgetown, Barbados, on March 12, 2014. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

    Small Tropical Islands Could Become the World’s First 100% Renewable Nations

    We’ve heard a lot about urgent climate action from “world leaders” in developed countries, yet actual concrete achievements have been limited. The rich world may... Read more

  • Young secondary forest in Costa Rica, with old-growth trees visible in the background. (Susan G. Letcher, CC BY-SA)

    Good News on Rain Forests: They Bounce Back Strong, Storing More Carbon Than Thought

    When you cut and burn a tropical forest, you’re left with a barren plain of cracked red mud, incapable of supporting life—the opposite of the... Read more

  • Map of North America’s artificial sky brightness. (Fabio Falchi et al./Science Advances)

    Light Pollution So Bad, 80 Percent of Americans Can’t See Milky Way Anymore

    Light pollution blankets America so extensively, almost four out of five can’t see the Milky Way at night from where they live. And the United States... Read more

  • Microplastic/microbeads(Photo by JOKER / Alexander Stein/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

    Scientist: We Could Be Inhaling Microplastics Laden With Chemicals

    Microplastics, or microbeads, are small plastic particles generally defined as being smaller than 5mm and originating from the disintegration of larger plastic. The particles are also used... Read more

  • volcano

    Large Magma Chamber Dubbed ‘Zombie Volcano’ Found in New Zealand Town

    Geologists have recently discovered a ‘zombie volcano’ in Matata—a small town located in the North Island of New Zealand. The term ‘zombie volcano’ refers to a... Read more

  • Roads built for logging in the Congo Basin have implications for forest management. (Fritz Kleinschroth)

    How Forests Recover Rapidly on Logging Roads in the Congo Basin

    Large areas of tropical forest worldwide are used for selective logging which requires extensive road networks to access trees harvested for timber. It is well... Read more

  • 01230123000a1

    20,000 Bees Chase Car Around for Days After Queen Bee Gets Trapped Inside

    Around 20,000 bees chased down their queen bee after it got trapped inside a car in Pembrokeshire. Eek! pic.twitter.com/oW0FEhNUG0 — Fly FM (@Fly_FM) May 24,... Read more

  • A common octopus resting on a reef. (Mattia ATH)

    Study: Octopus and Squid Populations Are Booming, Called ‘Weeds of the Sea’

    While many species of marine life are facing an unprecedented decline in population, one group of underwater critters are seeing a global increase.  Cephalopods—octopus, squid, and cuttlefish—are... Read more

  • Older, rougher and thicker Antarctic sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea in Oct. 2007, within the sea ice shield surrounding Antarctica. The ice in this region is approximately 33 feet (10 meters) thick.

    NASA: Antarctic Sea Ice Is Increasing and Arctic Ice Is Melting—Here’s Why

    The ice in Antarctica is increasing while ice in the Arctic is decreasing, a study by NASA and NOAA released on May 20 says. The... Read more

  • Paracanthurus hepatus in Prague sea aquarium “Sea world”, Czech Republic, on July 29, 2011. (Karelj/CC BY-SA 3.0)

    Finding Dory May Kill Her, Researchers Say—It Almost Killed Nemo

    In four weeks “Finding Dory” hits movie theaters. While producers have all the indications to hope it will be just as popular as its predecessor—”Finding Nemo”—some scientists... Read more

  • Radiation

    28 Signs the West Coast Is Being Absolutely Fried With Nuclear Radiation From Fukushima

    The map above comes from the Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center. It shows that radiation levels at radiation monitoring stations all over the country are elevated... Read more

  • Titan Arum, also know as The Big Stink due to its repulsive odour is in rare full bloom at Kew Gardens, London on April 22nd, 2016. A survey by the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, said 21 per cent of species are under threat. (Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

    Fifth of World’s Plants Under Threat, Warns Kew Gardens

    A fifth of the world’s plant species are at risk of extinction, researchers warned on Tuesday, May 10th, in an unprecedented global census of the... Read more

  • (Jean Lakosnyk/Unsplash.com)

    A Healthy Biosphere Means Healthier Humans

    Imagine if scientists came up with an inexpensive, easily administered way to decrease the risk of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and obesity by 25... Read more

  • Sunlight from a solar collector on the roof of Utah State University's Energy Laboratory in Logan, Utah, is sent through fiber optics to stimulate the growth of algae on June 11, 2009. USU was among several institutions to receive grant money from the U.S. Department of Defense to research ways to convert algae into biofuels for military jets. Utah State is examining about 300 algae species, including some from the Great Salt Lake in search of one that grows fast and produces plenty of fatty oils. (AP Photo/Colin Braley)

    Can We Save the Algae Biofuel Industry?

    Algal biofuels are in trouble. This alternative fuel source could help reduce overall carbon emissions without taking land from food production, like many crop-based biofuels... Read more

  • An aerial view shows Burj Dubai, the world's tallest tower built by Emaar property developer, rising among skyscrapers in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on Dec. 17, 2009. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

    The UAE Wants to Build a ‘Rainmaking Mountain’—Are We All OK With That?

    Eglwyswrw is a real place. This village in Wales is as long on rain as it is short on vowels. Last winter, it rained for... Read more

  • On March 20, 1980, after a quiet period of 123 years, earthquake activity began under Mount St. Helens. A week later, on March 27, small steam explosions, like this one, began. View fro the northeast.  (USGS)

    Over a Hundred Tremors Shake Mount St. Helens as It ‘Recharges’ With Magma

    In the past two months, more than 130 small earthquakes have been detected beneath Mount St. Helens, in Skamania County, Washington, the site of the devastating... Read more

  • Salema fishes swim in a cove off Portofino, Italy, on Sept. 8, 2015. (Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images)

    Why Non-Renewables Are Still in Abundance While Renewables Are Not

    The problem the world faces is that many of the resources that are truly threatened are the renewable ones, not, as so often assumed, the... Read more

  • Youtube video thumbnail. (oceanexplorergov/Youtube)

    Stunning Jellyfish With Lights Discovered in Mariana Trench, 12,000 Feet Deep

    Update: Multiple media reports seemed to suggest this jellyfish is a new species. We have asked the NOAA and this is the response we’ve received:... Read more

  • (Nina Aldin Thune/Creative Commons)

    Report: Great Pyramid of Giza Leans Ever So Slightly

    The Tower of Pisa isn’t the only world monument that leans. The west side of the Great Pyramid of Giza—and one of the Seven Wonders... Read more

  • The Great Pyramid of Giza. (Nina/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA)

    Egyptian Pharaohs First Put Houses on a Grid

    Egyptian pharaohs, who are remembered for their pyramids and temples, were also the world’s first urban planners. New research offers additional insights into how the... Read more

  • In 1901, divers exploring off the coast of Greece came upon a vast sunken treasure, and amidst the many fabulous objects was an item that continues to intrigue many to this day. Called the Antikythera Mechanism, the 2,100-year-old artifact is a mind-bending assembly of moving parts. (AOL Screenshot)

    World’s Oldest Computer May Have Been Built to Predict Future (Video)

    At the dawn of 1900s, divers exploring off the coast of Greece came upon a vast sunken treasure, and amidst the many fabulous objects was... Read more

  • (Damian Evans/Cambodian Archaeological Lidar Initiative)

    Meet Lidar: The Amazing Laser Technology That’s Helping Archaeologists Discover Lost Cities

    Archaeologists have discovered several medieval cities, buried beneath the forest floor in Cambodia: the largest is said to rival the modern Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh,... Read more

  • Greek archaeologist Christofilis Maggidis speaks as a photograph of a stone he believes belonged to the lost royal throne in the ancient palace of Mycenae, heart of the Mycenaean civilization, in southern Greece, during a press conference in Athens, on June 14, 2016. Maggidis says the worked stone, found by chance two years ago under the prehistoric citadel, is a chunk of the monolithic throne that was smashed when an earthquake sent part of the palace tumbling into a streambed below. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Archaeologist Claims He’s Found Ancient Greek Kings’ Throne

    ATHENS, Greece—A Greek archaeologist believes he has found a fragment of the lost throne of the rulers of Mycenae, famous from ancient myth and the... Read more

  • Travel of Olleros family in Hong Kong and Cambodia during Christmas 2015. Photo by Xaume Olleros

    Vast, Ancient Cities Beneath Cambodian Jungle Change History Books

    Archaeologists in Cambodia have found medieval cities between 900 and 1,400 years old buried beneath Cambodia’s jungle floor. The cities are considered a groundbreaking discovery... Read more

  • Using satellite data and drones, researchers say they've found a large monument in the ancient city of Petra, Jordan. (AOL Screenshot)

    Ancient Monument ‘Hiding In Plain Sight’ Found In Petra, Jordan (Video)

    Petra is a world wonder carved directly into the red, white and pink cliffs of Jordan. And now, an additional structure has been discovered within... Read more

  • (PHOTOCREO/Michal Bednarek/Shutterstock)

    Evidence Accumulates for Ancient Transoceanic Voyages, Says Geographer

    Theories on the fringe of science sometimes slowly work their way into the core as the evidence accumulates. “A classic example is the continental drift... Read more

  • Fallen star sword. (Daniella Comelli/University of Pisa)

    Why Did Tutankhamen Have a Dagger Made From a Meteorite?

    Scientists have long speculated that the ancient Egyptians used metal from meteorites to make iron objects. Now an analysis of a dagger found in Tutankhamen’s... Read more

  • The burial mask of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun is shown during the 'Tutanchamun - Sein Grab und die Schaetze' Exhibition Preview at Kleine Olympiahalle on April 2, 2015 in Munich, Germany.  (Photo by Hannes Magerstaedt/Getty Images)

    King Tut’s Dagger Was Forged From a Meteorite

    The dagger that was buried with Egyptian King Tutankhamun was made from a meteorite, a study says. Researchers say the iron used to make the... Read more

  • Photo Credit: Tilemahos Efthimiadis via Compfight cc

    Greek Archaelogist Says He Has Found Aristotle’s Tomb

    A Greek archaeologist claimed on May 26 to have discovered the tomb of philosopher Aristotle in the ancient city Stageira in Greece. The archaeologist, Konstantinos... Read more

  • cave

    Discovery of 176,500-Year-Old Human Structures in Cave Confound Scientists

    An incredible discovery may change everything we thought we knew about ancient humans.  The Bruniquel Cave, located in southwestern France, was discovered in 1990. Inside, 1,100 feet... Read more

  • Wayne MacIsaac stands near what he believes may be the remnants of a Norse fortification wall. (Tara MacIsaac/Epoch Times)

    New Lead in the Search for Elusive Norse Settlements

    CODROY VALLEY, Canada–A story passed down in my family for generations may be the clue to finding a lost Norse settlement. The only Norse settlement in the... Read more

  • "The stone tools and faunal remains at the site show that at 14,550 years ago, people knew how to find game, fresh water, and material for making tools," says Michael Waters. "These people were well-adapted to this environment. The site is a slam-dunk pre-Clovis site with unequivocal artifacts, clear stratigraphy, and thorough dating." (Texas A&M University)

    Tusk Hints Humans Were in Florida 14,500 Years Ago

    Stone tools found in a Florida river show that humans settled the southeastern United States far earlier than previously believed—perhaps by as much as 1,500... Read more

  • Rare bronze artifacts, part of a large ancient marine cargo of a merchant ship that sank during the Late Roman period 1,600 years ago seen during a presentation of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Caesarea, Israel. Monday, May 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)

    Video: Israeli Divers Find Massive Treasure From a Roman Shipwreck 1,600 Years Ago

    Israeli divers discovered a trove of of artifacts, including statues and thousands of coins 1,600 years old, lying on the seabed of the ancient harbor... Read more

  • Ashkenazic Jews residing in the "American colony," 1900-1920. (Library of Congress, Public Domain)

    Uncovering Ancient Ashkenaz—the Birthplace of Yiddish Speakers

    At 1,000 years, the search for the location of Ashkenaz—thought to be the birthplace of Ashkanazic Jews and the Yiddish language—is one of the longest... Read more

  • (ABC screenshot)

    Workers Find 1,300 Pounds of Ancient Roman Coins in Spanish Town of Tomares

    Culture officials said park workers in Spain made a unique historic discovery: over a thousand pounds of Roman coins in the town of Tomares outside... Read more

  • Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 11.45.40 AM

    Taiwan Archeologists Unearth 4,800-Year-Old Mother Cradling a Child

    An archaeological find in central Taiwan is both striking and heartwarming.  Uncovered graves in central Taiwan’s Taichung municipality has led to the discovery of 4,800-year-old fossilized remains of a woman gazing at... Read more

  • Earth-day

    Earth Day 2016: The 20 Most Amazing Discoveries Since Earth Day 2015

    To celebrate Earth Day 2016, we have compiled some of the amazing archeological finds that our Earth has been hiding since last Earth Day. From... Read more

  • Clipboard01

    How Ancient Egypt Shaped the Modern World (Infographic)

    By Fairmont.com…... Read more


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