Science

Shrinking of Antarctic Ice Shelves Is Accelerating

Spigot Peak on the Antarctic Peninsula facing Cuverville Island was named for its resemblance to a wooden peg. (David Stanley, CC BY)
Spigot Peak on the Antarctic Peninsula facing Cuverville Island was named for its resemblance to a wooden peg. (David Stanley, CC BY)

Ask people what they know about Antarctica and they usually mention cold, snow and ice. In fact, there’s so much ice on Antarctica that if...


Most recent Science blogs and columns

  • Hummingbird feeding. (Eric Kilby, CC BY-SA 2.0)

    ‘Stubby’ Wings Let Hummingbirds Hover so Well

    Scientists have used more than a million fine samples of aerodynamic force and airflow combined to determine what makes a hummingbird’s wings so good at hovering. The... Read more

  • Phlegmariurus species of Veracruz: a) P. myrsinites, b) P. pringlei in habitat, c) P. taxifolius in habitat, d) P. orizabae (image courtesy of the C. V. Starr Virtual Herbarium of The New York Botanical Garden), e) P. linifolius sold in a gift shop, f) P. pringlei and P. taxifolius sold at a local market in Xalapa.

    Extinction Possible for Club Mosses in Mexico

    In Mexico’s rainforests, club mosses – fern-like plants that resemble the branches of pine trees – are in trouble. All nine species of the club... Read more

  • GLobal Forest Watch map showing protected areas and industrial concessions in and around the Leuser Ecosystem in Aceh and North Sumatra on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

    Forest in Indonesia Threatened by Logging and Plantations

    The rate of forest loss in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem — the only place on Earth where rhinos, orangutans, tigers, and elephants live in the same... Read more

  • (Cambridge, MA John Harrison)

    Coyotes in New York City – We Have Nothing to Fear

    NEW YORK—It was a cold day in Cortlandt Park as we walked along a series of snow-covered paths, taking in the vast expanse of whiteness, looking for... Read more

  • Savannah elephant in Kruger National Park in South Africa. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

    Elephant Poaching Rate Unchanged—and Still Devastating

    New figures show essentially no change in the number of elephants killed in Africa by poachers last year, despite a high-profile meeting on the crisis... Read more

  • House Sparrows (Matt MacGillivray/wikimedia.org)

    Villagers Highlight Bird Plight With Special Wedding

    It was a wedding that had an invitation list of more than a 1000 guests. In Mohanpur village in Banda district of UP, India, Chunmun... Read more

  • US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko walk after their space suits were tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

    3 Astronauts to Blast Off for 1-year Trip to Space Station

    BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan—An American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts are to blast off early Saturday to begin a year away from Earth. Of the three-man team,... Read more

  • In this Sept. 19, 2014 photo provided by Elizabeth Farnsworth, a mixed northern hardwoods forests whose understory is lush with diverse ferns, shrubs, and flowering herbs, grows in Amherst, Mass. A comprehensive report being released Thursday, March 26, 2015, by the New England Wild Flower Society shows that much of New England’s rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds. Conservationists studied more than 3,500 known plant species and determined that about 22 percent are considered rare, in decline, endangered or possibly extinct. Many plants also range over a much smaller geographical area than they once did. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Farnsworth)

    Report: Diversity of New England Plant Life Is Threatened

    BOSTON — From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England’s rich native flora is fighting for survival... Read more

  • Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter Mission MOM. (Vipal M.B.)

    Water May Have Struck This Mars Crater Twice

    A new geologic history of the flow of water in Jezero crater near Mars’ equator says interesting things about how the red planet operated nearly... Read more

  • Bee of the genus Apis on a flower. (Wikimedia Common, Maciej A. Czyzewski)

    Common Metal Addles Honey Bee Brains

    At levels considered safe for human food, a common industrial pollutant called manganese can knock honey bees off their game. A new study shows that... Read more

  • Sun rays catching a rainforest palm fron in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.

    Forest Exploitation Moratorium Extended in Indonesia

    Less than two months before the expiration of an Indonesian forest exploitation moratorium set up under an agreement with Norway, activists called on Environment and... Read more

  • Rainforest understory in Gunug Palung National Park. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

    Reforestation Programs May Reduce Illegal Logging

    Can the act of planting a tree change one’s attitude towards forests and conservation? Erica Pohnan, Hotlin Ompusunggu, and Campbell Webb, from the conservation NGO... Read more

  • "Our study presents the first relatively concrete evidence that mobile and sedentary people came together to build a ceremonial center," says Takeshi Inomata. (Credit: Takeshi Inomata)

    Maya Ceremony Center Built by Farmers and Hunters

    Excavations at the ancient Maya lowlands site of Ceibal in Guatemala suggest that as the society moved from a heavy reliance on foraging to one... Read more

  • The findings may be relevant to the challenges faced by medical practitioners and airport screeners, who examine overlapping objects, through x-rays and security scanners readings, possibly outlined by different hues or brightness. (Shutterstock*)

    Why Our Eyes ‘Multitask’ Even If We Try to Focus

    Even when we need to focus on just one dimension of an object—such as color, texture, or luminance—our eyes just can’t help focusing on several, said... Read more

  • This Monday, Sept. 12, 2005 photo provided by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency shows an asteroid named Itokawa photographed by the Hayabusa probe. On Wednesday, March 25, 2015, NASA announced it is aiming to launch a rocket to an asteroid in five years and grab a boulder off of it - a stepping stone and training mission for an eventual trip sending humans to Mars. Itokawa, 2008 EV5 and Bennu are the candidates for the mission. (AP Photo/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency)

    NASA Unveils Plan to Grab Chunk of Asteroid to Study in Space

    WASHINGTON—NASA is aiming to launch a rocket to an asteroid in five years and grab a boulder off of it—a stepping stone and training mission... Read more

  • Workers carry construction material at the under-construction coal-fired power plant, partially financed by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, in Kudgi, India on Feb. 24, 2015. Despite mounting protests, Japan continues to finance the building of coal-fired power plants with money earmarked for fighting climate change, with two new projects underway in India and Bangladesh. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

    Japan Uses Climate Cash for Coal Plants in India, Bangladesh

    MUTTAGI, India—Despite mounting protests, Japan continues to finance the building of coal-fired power plants with money earmarked for fighting climate change, with two new projects... Read more

  • Hummingbird feeding. (Eric Kilby, CC BY-SA 2.0)

    ‘Stubby’ Wings Let Hummingbirds Hover so Well

    Scientists have used more than a million fine samples of aerodynamic force and airflow combined to determine what makes a hummingbird’s wings so good at hovering. The... Read more

  • The findings may be relevant to the challenges faced by medical practitioners and airport screeners, who examine overlapping objects, through x-rays and security scanners readings, possibly outlined by different hues or brightness. (Shutterstock*)

    Why Our Eyes ‘Multitask’ Even If We Try to Focus

    Even when we need to focus on just one dimension of an object—such as color, texture, or luminance—our eyes just can’t help focusing on several, said... Read more

  • University of Edinburgh researchers say the species discovered in Portugal was among the Earth's top predators. The team said Tuesday it was part of a wider group of primitive amphibians that were widespread at the time. (AP/ University of Edinburgh, Joana Bruno)

    Researchers Find Fossil of ‘Super Salamander’ Species

    LONDON—Fossil remains of a previously unknown species of a crocodile-like “super salamander” that grew as long as a small car and was a top predator... Read more

  • Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka, center, and Mikhail Korniyenko pose before their final preflight practical examination in a mock-up of a Soyuz TMA space craft at Russian Space Training Center in Star City, outside Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 5, 2015. The three are the next crew scheduled to blast off to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on a Russian made Soyuz TMA-16M space craft on March, 27. (AP/Pavel Golovkin)

    Russia to Resume Space Tourism in 2018

    MOSCOW—Russia officials say they will resume space tourism in 2018 after years of sending into space only professional cosmonauts and astronauts. Russia had sent seven paying guests... Read more

  • Magnets have mysterious powers – now shown to influence heat and sound. (Clarence Risher, CC BY-SA)

    Magnetic Fields Can Control Heat and Sound

    Sound is carried by periodic vibrations of atoms in gases, liquids, and solids. When we talk to each other, the vocal chords of the speaker... Read more

  • A group of Harvard researchers have been working on this project for a while, but it's not without critics. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Add Woolly Mammoth DNA to Elephant Cells (Video)

    The woolly mammoth has been extinct for some 4,000 years. But now researchers are attempting to bring it back to life. A team at Harvard University has successfully inserted woolly... Read more

  • "We've discovered how droplets can exhibit behaviors akin to artificial chemotaxis," says Manu Prakash. (Stanford via YouTube)

    Why Food Coloring Droplets ‘Dance’ Around

    Under certain circumstances, droplets of fluid will move like performers in a dance choreographed by molecular physics. “These droplets sense one another, they move and... Read more

  • (KatelynK/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Brain’s Light Detector Is Not So Simple After All

    Neuroscientists generally think of the front end of the human visual system as a simple light detection system. The patterns produced when light falls on... Read more

  • Sandy Hillburn poses for a photo in her apartment in Fort Lee, N.J., on Tuesday, March 10, 2015. In April 2006, when she was diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most common and deadly kind of brain tumor, she recalled, "I was told I had two to three months to live." But she was offered a slot in an experimental study involving adding the tetanus-diphtheria vaccine to an experimental treatment for glioblastoma. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Tetanus Vaccine Successful in Treating Brain Cancer in Small Study

    NEW YORK —Can a tetanus shot help treat brain cancer? A small study hints that it might. A dose of tetanus vaccine let patients live... Read more

  • (madhan r/Flickr)

    What a Handshake Smells Like

    The most important information relayed by a handshake isn’t conveyed through touch at all. Rather, according to a team of neurobiologists from Israel’s Weizmann Institute,... Read more

  • In the hopes of determining, once and for all, what role the hormone melatonin actually plays in sleep, researchers turned to zebrafish. Like humans, zebrafish are diurnal—awake during the day and asleep at night—and produce melatonin at night.(michaeljung/iStock/Thinkstock)

    New Study With Zebrafish Shows How Melatonin Helps You Sleep

    Melatonin supplements are often taken as a sleep aid, although it’s not clear if or how they work. Our bodies also make melatonin naturally, and a... Read more

  • Flowers adorn the Hollywood Walk of Fame star of Leonard Nimoy in Los Angeles Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek” died Friday, Feb. 27, 2015 in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    One of the Family: Leonard Nimoy’s Impact on Fandom

    The world said goodbye to Leonard Nimoy last week, and for those who identify as serious fans of Star Trek, the loss felt unexpectedly personal... Read more

  • "Before this research, we didn't have a good way of controlling or understanding friction," Zvonomir Dogic says. "We still have a lot more to understand but now, one of our oldest sciences is becoming less opaque." (Zokru/Istock/Thinkstock)

    Friction at the Microscopic Level Is Shockingly Strong

    Here’s the rub with friction: scientists don’t really know how it works. Sure, humans have been harnessing the power of friction since rubbing two sticks... Read more

  • A SIM card is next to an Apple iPhome 6 on March 10, 2015. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

    Time to Disconnect: Why the SIM Card Has Had Its Day

    The small microchips known as “subscriber identity modules” or SIM cards that are required for mobile phones to log on to a phone network will... Read more

  • "Our findings help explain why anxious individuals may find decision-making under uncertainty hard as they struggle to pick up on clues as to whether they are in a stable or changing situation," says Sonia Bishop. (Dominic Alves, CC BY)

    Stable or in Flux? How Anxiety Can Botch Decisions

    When things get unpredictable, people prone to high anxiety may have a harder time reading the environmental cues that could help them avoid a bad... Read more

  • Superconducting materials have strange and unusual properties including magnetic levitation. (ktsimage/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Explainer: What Is a Superconductor?

    Materials can be divided into two categories based on their ability to conduct electricity. Metals, such as copper and silver, allow electrons to move freely... Read more

  • octopus-crab

    Watch Terrifying Moment When an Octopus Jumps Out of the Water to Kill a Crab

    It’s rare to see an octopus attack a crab, but it’s even rarer to see one jumping out of the water to do so. Here’s... Read more

  • There must be energy here…somewhere. NASA

    How Energy From Dry Ice Could Power Human Colonies on Mars

    A mission to Mars has captured the public’s imagination and the possibility of making that second small step has never seemed so close. Current NASA... Read more

  • Researchers have identified a group of neurons in the basal forebrain that help synchronize activity in the cortex, triggering brain waves that are characteristic of consciousness, perception, and attention.
(Eraxion/thinkstockphotos.com)

    Tuning in on Brain Waves

    Certain neurons act as conductors, suggesting possible therapies for disorders such as schizophrenia Like musical sounds, different states of mind are defined by distinct, characteristic... Read more

  • (monkeybusinessimages/iStock/thinkstock)

    Crowdsourcing Can Say if Speech Therapy Works

    Crowdsourcing can be a cheap, unbiased way to determine if patients with speech disorders are pronouncing sounds correctly, report researchers. “Because large crowdsourced samples can... Read more

  • (™ Pacheco/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0)

    What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

    What makes a person believe that he visited heaven? Is there a way for science to get at what’s really going on? In the April 2015 issue of... Read more

  • M27: The Dumbbell Nebula (Bill Snyder/NASA.gov)

    The Search Continues for Extraterrestrial Life, but Should It? (Part 1)

    The search continues for extraterrestrial life. Finding it could, however, not only be very difficult with our current level of technology, but could also radically... Read more

  • The Great Sphinx of Giza. (pius99/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Fossil Suggests Egyptian Pyramids and Sphinx Once Submerged Under Sea Water

    The entire landscape of the Giza Necropolis, including the pyramids and the Sphinx, shows erosion that some say suggests the area was once submerged by... Read more

  • Left: Dr. Allan Combs is a professor of Consciousness Studies and director of The Center for Consciousness Studies at the California Institute of Integral Studies. (Courtesy of Dr. Allan Combs) Right: A concept illustration of consciousness. (Shutterstock*)

    A Place for Consciousness Studies in Academia? Professor Helps Pave the Way

    Dr. Allan Leslie Combs is developing a Consciousness Studies PhD program at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS). “Consciousness was traditionally treated by what... Read more

  • The mummy of Buddhist Master Liuquan, shown inside a Buddha statue via scans. (M. Elsevier Stokmans, Courtesy of Drents Museum)

    Mummy Found Inside 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue

    A Buddha statue dating back to the 11th or 12th century was examined by CT scan and endoscopy in the Netherlands late last year, revealing that it... Read more

  • Bronze Age skull from Jericho, Palestine, 2200–2000 B.C. and an early example of trepanation, the oldest form of neurosurgery, which involves drilling into the skull. (Wellcome Images/CC BY 4.0/ Wikimedia Commons)

    Advanced Ancient Knowledge: Brain Surgery 2,500 Years Ago

    How did people in ancient times deal with the health complications that we use advanced techniques to treat today? Many think that ancient folk simply... Read more

  • A file photo of a bronze nugget and an illustration of a sunken city. The legendary metal orichalcum of Atlantis has been thought to be a brass-like alloy. (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Orichalcum: Legendary Metal of Atlantis Found in 2,600-Year-Old Shipwreck

    Legend holds that in very ancient times alongside gold and silver, another precious metal was coveted and mined in Atlantis. That metal was called orichalcum,... Read more

  • Left: Astronaut Dr. Edgar Mitchell. (NASA) Right: U.K. computer hacker Gary McKinnon, who has allegedly viewed U.S. government UFO images and excel documents describing "non-terrestrial officers." (Wikimedia Commons) Background: Illustration of a spaceship. (Shutterstock*)

    The Solar Warden Covert Space Project: Fact or Science Fiction?

    There are, and have been for some time, claims by UFO disclosure supporters that there is in existence a fleet or fleets of human spaceships... Read more

  • A totem pole in Thunderbird Park, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. (Emmanuel Brunner/Wikimedia Commons)

    Was the Mythical Thunderbird a Real Creature?

    Perhaps the most elusive and legendary among America’s mythical creatures is the thunderbird, a giant eagle-like bird with incredible strength. This creature has been reported... Read more

  • (Vincepal, CC BY-SA 2.0 and Stockbyte/Thinkstock)

    Our Individual Mind Is Part of a Greater Consciousness and This Is Why It Matters

    I am honored to interview Dr Larry Dossey about his new book, One Mind. Larry is is one of the fathers of the holistic medicine... Read more

  • A storm over Bodie, Calif.  (Photographersnature.com/Wikimedia Commons) Right: A mask found in the ghost town of Bodie Calif., which has been deserted since the days just following the gold rush. (Tahoenathan/Wikimedia Commons)

    A Trip to Ghost Town Bodie, California (+Photos)

    Bodie, California, following the discovery of gold in 1859, became a bustling, Wild West, boom town. Bodie had all the amenities of some of the larger... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Over the Past 5 Months More Than 100 US Children Have Become Mysteriously Paralyzed

    Researchers have a leading suspect in mind for what may have caused the paralysis of more than 100 children in the United States since August... Read more

  • Dashi-Dorzho Itigilov (1852-1927). A mummy in the lotus meditation position found Jan. 27, 2015, in Mongolia is said to possibly be Itigilov. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Mummy Found in Meditation Position: Legendary Mongolian Lama?

    A mummy estimated from preliminary investigations to be about 200 years old, sitting in the lotus meditation position, was found in Mongolia on Jan. 27,... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Amazing Telekinesis Experiments Reviewed in US Air Force-Commissioned Report

    Studies have shown that people can use their minds (or some other unexplained means) to bend metal, transport objects from inside a sealed container to... Read more

  • (decisiveimages/iStock/thinkstock)

    Businessman Gets Important Lesson From Past Life—Detailed Memories Verified

    Ruprecht Schultz had a strange habit as a child of forming his fingers into the shape of a gun, and pointing at his head, saying... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    A Wormhole Close to Home and 2 Other Astonishing Space Holes

    It’s possible a wormhole exists in the middle of the Milky Way that could be large and stable enough for a spaceship to enter. “In... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Did Humans Walk the Earth With Dinosaurs? Triceratops Horn Dated to 33,500 Years

    A triceratops brow horn discovered in Dawson County, Mont., has been controversially dated to around 33,500 years, challenging the view that dinosaurs died out around... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Do Some People Sense the Unseen? (Part 3)

    Often science dismisses what it doesn’t yet grasp, until technology or some other breakthrough turns the tide. Before the advent of MRIs, for example, if... Read more

  • (Vasabii/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Cool, Yet Creepy, Mind-Control and Mind-Controlled Technology

    The ways in which technology controls our minds may go eerily beyond our habits of blindly following GPS directions or instantly Googling something instead of thinking... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Traveling Faster Than the Speed of Light: Warp Drive Feasible?

    Going faster than the speed of light is impossible, according to Albert Einstein’s Special Relativity Theory, yet theoretical physicists bend their minds to the task,... Read more

  • US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko walk after their space suits were tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

    3 Astronauts to Blast Off for 1-year Trip to Space Station

    BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan—An American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts are to blast off early Saturday to begin a year away from Earth. Of the three-man team,... Read more

  • Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter Mission MOM. (Vipal M.B.)

    Water May Have Struck This Mars Crater Twice

    A new geologic history of the flow of water in Jezero crater near Mars’ equator says interesting things about how the red planet operated nearly... Read more

  • This Monday, Sept. 12, 2005 photo provided by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency shows an asteroid named Itokawa photographed by the Hayabusa probe. On Wednesday, March 25, 2015, NASA announced it is aiming to launch a rocket to an asteroid in five years and grab a boulder off of it - a stepping stone and training mission for an eventual trip sending humans to Mars. Itokawa, 2008 EV5 and Bennu are the candidates for the mission. (AP Photo/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency)

    NASA Unveils Plan to Grab Chunk of Asteroid to Study in Space

    WASHINGTON—NASA is aiming to launch a rocket to an asteroid in five years and grab a boulder off of it—a stepping stone and training mission... Read more

  • "This database gives us the first glimpse at what diverse worlds out there could look like," says Lisa Kaltenegger. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, CC BY)

    Color Key to Aid Search for Life on Exoplanets

    To help find life beyond our solar system, scientists have created a colorful catalog containing reflection signatures of Earth life forms that might be found... Read more

  • As visible from Europe (weather permitting). (Luc Viatour, CC BY)

    Solar Eclipse: A Rare Opportunity to Bask in the Moon’s Shadow

    A total solar eclipse is an extraordinary visual and emotional experience, from the moon’s first bite out of the sun’s unblemished disc, to the moment... Read more

  • Aurora borealis, or northern lights. (Tore Meek/AFP/Getty Images)

    What Caused Those Spectacular Northern Lights – and How You Can Catch Them Next Time

    Catching a glimpse of the northern lights is apparently the top experience for Britons compiling a “bucket list” of must-do experiences before they die. It’s... Read more

  • Researchers looking for habitable planets in the galaxy are using a model that estimates more planets could support life than previously thought. (AOL Screenshot)

    New Research Predicts Billions of Livable Milky Way Planets (Video)

    The search for habitable planets may have just taken a big step forward. New research indicates most stars in the Milky Way have between one... Read more

  • The Aurora Borealis can be seen over Northern Europe on Tuesday night because of a solar storm hitting the Earth. People in Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden said they could see the Northern Lights.  (RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/Getty Images)

    Aurora Borealis in Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Maine, Colorado?

    The Aurora Borealis can be seen over Northern Europe on Tuesday night because of a solar storm hitting the Earth. People in Scotland, Ireland, Iceland,... Read more

  • The Aurora Borealis, known as the Northern Lights, might be appearing as far south as Washington state, Colorado Oregon, the Dakotas, the U.K. (Midlands), Germany, New Jersey, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and New York. One can watch a live stream of the event online here.  (RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/Getty Images)

    Live Stream: Watch Aurora Borealis / Northern Lights Video on Slooh Telescope (Photos)

    The Aurora Borealis, known as the Northern Lights, might be appearing as far south as Washington state, Colorado Oregon, the Dakotas, the U.K. (Midlands), Germany,... Read more

  • northern-lights-1

    Solar Storm Hitting Earth

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A severe solar storm smacked Earth with a surprisingly big geomagnetic jolt Tuesday, potentially affecting power grids and GPS tracking while pushing the... Read more

  • This Friday, there’s going to be a rare phenomenon: A supermoon, solar eclipse, and a vernal equinox will take place all on the same day.
  (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Full Moon Dates: Supermoon 2015 Calendar to have Solar Eclipse, Also Equinox

    This Friday, there’s going to be a rare phenomenon: A supermoon, solar eclipse, and the spring equinox will all take place all on the same... Read more

  • A bright fireball was spotted over Loch Ness, Scotland, on Sunday, according to STV News. (Google Maps)

    See Amazing Meteor Over Loch Ness

    This week, it wasn’t Nessie sightings that left a Loch Ness spectator in amazement. Spectacular photo of meteor caught on camera at Loch Ness was... Read more

  • With geysers bursting through an icy crust, Enceladus is a tiny moon with a big personality. Hsiang-Wen Hsu et al/Nature, Author provided

    Icy Plumes Bursting From Saturn’s Moon Enceladus Suggest It Could Harbour Life

    The Cassini mission that has investigated Saturn since 2004 has revealed much about the giant planet and its many moons. Perhaps most tantalising is the... Read more

  • White dwarf star

    Will the Search for Dark Matter End With This Galaxy?

    A newly discovered dwarf galaxy orbiting the Milky Way appears to be radiating gamma rays—a sign that dark matter may be lurking at the galaxy’s... Read more

  • This Feb. 19, 2015 file image provided by NASA shows the dwarf planet Ceres, taken by the space agency's Dawn spacecraft from a distance of nearly 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers). On Friday, March 6, 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft arrives at the mysterious dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter after a nearly eight-year journey. Dawn, which previously visited Vesta, also in the asteroid belt, has already beamed back images of Ceres as it closes in. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA, File)

    NASA’s Dawn Spacecraft Enters Orbit Around Dwarf Planet Ceres

    LOS ANGELES—The largest celestial body in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter welcomes its first visitor Friday. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft was due to slip... Read more

  • "We know that precipitation can slow us down on our way to work," says Mark Voit. "Now we know it can also slow down star formation in galaxies with huge black holes." Shown here: the galaxy cluster known as Abell 2597. (Credit: NASA/CXC/STSci/DSS/Magellan)

    Galactic ‘Rain’ Can Slow Down Birth of Stars

    Some galaxies, like the Milky Way, are veritable star nurseries, giving birth to at least one baby star every year. Others are barren. Until now,... Read more

  • This false color image shows Titan's northern wetlands and atmosphere. (Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / Val Klavans via Flickr)

    Here’s a Blueprint for Life on Saturn’s Moon

    Using both science and imagination, chemical engineers and astronomers have come up with a template for life on Titan, the giant moon of Saturn. Although liquid water... Read more

  • A Defense Meteorological Satellite System (DMSP) satellite (US Air Force)

    Satellite Explosion: Humans Don’t Just Pollute Earth, We Pollute Space Too

    An Air Force satellite exploded over the Earth and has sent 43 pieces of debris into separate orbits around the planet, adding to the more than 500,000 pieces... Read more

  • (YouTube screenshot)

    See the India Sky ‘Fireball’ That Has Freaked Out Locals

    A fireball that appeared over the Indian state of Kerala has baffled local residents and scientists alike. Indian government scientists have been working to discover... Read more

  • NASA scientists still don’t have a clear picture of the bright spots showing up on the surface of Ceres, a minor planet in the asteroid belt. (AOL Screenshot)

    NASA’s Dawn Spacecraft Spots Two Bright Points on Ceres (Video)

    The Dawn spacecraft has spotted not one, but two bright points on the minor planet Ceres. Newly enhanced images from the probe show two shining... Read more

  • Phlegmariurus species of Veracruz: a) P. myrsinites, b) P. pringlei in habitat, c) P. taxifolius in habitat, d) P. orizabae (image courtesy of the C. V. Starr Virtual Herbarium of The New York Botanical Garden), e) P. linifolius sold in a gift shop, f) P. pringlei and P. taxifolius sold at a local market in Xalapa.

    Extinction Possible for Club Mosses in Mexico

    In Mexico’s rainforests, club mosses – fern-like plants that resemble the branches of pine trees – are in trouble. All nine species of the club... Read more

  • GLobal Forest Watch map showing protected areas and industrial concessions in and around the Leuser Ecosystem in Aceh and North Sumatra on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

    Forest in Indonesia Threatened by Logging and Plantations

    The rate of forest loss in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem — the only place on Earth where rhinos, orangutans, tigers, and elephants live in the same... Read more

  • (Cambridge, MA John Harrison)

    Coyotes in New York City – We Have Nothing to Fear

    NEW YORK—It was a cold day in Cortlandt Park as we walked along a series of snow-covered paths, taking in the vast expanse of whiteness, looking for... Read more

  • Savannah elephant in Kruger National Park in South Africa. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

    Elephant Poaching Rate Unchanged—and Still Devastating

    New figures show essentially no change in the number of elephants killed in Africa by poachers last year, despite a high-profile meeting on the crisis... Read more

  • House Sparrows (Matt MacGillivray/wikimedia.org)

    Villagers Highlight Bird Plight With Special Wedding

    It was a wedding that had an invitation list of more than a 1000 guests. In Mohanpur village in Banda district of UP, India, Chunmun... Read more

  • In this Sept. 19, 2014 photo provided by Elizabeth Farnsworth, a mixed northern hardwoods forests whose understory is lush with diverse ferns, shrubs, and flowering herbs, grows in Amherst, Mass. A comprehensive report being released Thursday, March 26, 2015, by the New England Wild Flower Society shows that much of New England’s rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds. Conservationists studied more than 3,500 known plant species and determined that about 22 percent are considered rare, in decline, endangered or possibly extinct. Many plants also range over a much smaller geographical area than they once did. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Farnsworth)

    Report: Diversity of New England Plant Life Is Threatened

    BOSTON — From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England’s rich native flora is fighting for survival... Read more

  • Bee of the genus Apis on a flower. (Wikimedia Common, Maciej A. Czyzewski)

    Common Metal Addles Honey Bee Brains

    At levels considered safe for human food, a common industrial pollutant called manganese can knock honey bees off their game. A new study shows that... Read more

  • Sun rays catching a rainforest palm fron in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.

    Forest Exploitation Moratorium Extended in Indonesia

    Less than two months before the expiration of an Indonesian forest exploitation moratorium set up under an agreement with Norway, activists called on Environment and... Read more

  • Rainforest understory in Gunug Palung National Park. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

    Reforestation Programs May Reduce Illegal Logging

    Can the act of planting a tree change one’s attitude towards forests and conservation? Erica Pohnan, Hotlin Ompusunggu, and Campbell Webb, from the conservation NGO... Read more

  • Workers carry construction material at the under-construction coal-fired power plant, partially financed by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, in Kudgi, India on Feb. 24, 2015. Despite mounting protests, Japan continues to finance the building of coal-fired power plants with money earmarked for fighting climate change, with two new projects underway in India and Bangladesh. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

    Japan Uses Climate Cash for Coal Plants in India, Bangladesh

    MUTTAGI, India—Despite mounting protests, Japan continues to finance the building of coal-fired power plants with money earmarked for fighting climate change, with two new projects... Read more

  • Cononaco river in the Ecuadorian Amazon from the air via Shutterstock*

    Amazon Carbon Sink Is in Decline as Trees Die Off Faster

    Tropical forests are being exposed to unprecedented environmental change, with huge knock-on effects. In the past decade, the carbon absorbed annually by the Amazon rain... Read more

  • Fragments of forest in the agricultural landscape around Sinop, Brazil, an area where soybean farming and cattle ranching have expanded at the expense of the Amazon rainforest. Image courtesy of Google Earth.

    World’s Fragmented Forests Are Deteriorating

    The world’s forests are fragmented and deteriorating, states a new paper published in Science Advances. After analyzing satellite imagery and compiling data from long-term fragmentation... Read more

  • A cinereous mourner nestling that resembled a toxic caterpillar in the Megalopygidae family of moths. Photo by: Santiago David Rivera.

    Bizarre Mimicry in the Amazon Rainforest

    “Mama, I wanna be a toxic caterpillar,” says the little bird. “Okay,” mamma answers, “but first you gotta study your Batesian mimicry.”  Meet the cinereous... Read more

  • Iceberg in Greenland via Shuttertock*

    When an Antarctic Iceberg the Size of a Country Breaks Away, What Happens Next?

    You never forget the first time you see an iceberg. The horizon of a ship at sea is a two dimensional space and to see... Read more

  • British actress Emma Thompson (C) and John Sauven from Greenpeace join an estimated 40,000 thousand people marching from the Embankment via Whitehall to the Houses of Parliament in London, Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014, as part of the People's Climate March, a worldwide mobilisation calling on world leaders to commit to urgent action on climate change and 100% clean energy. (AP Photo/Greenpeace International, John Cobb)

    Greenpeace Co-founder Attacks Climate Change Theory, Again

    A leader in international environmentalism, Patrick Moore, Ph.D., said in a recent article he wrote for Heartland that he is skeptical of the well-accepted argument that... Read more

  • (Youtube)

    Fukushima Water: The New Energy Drink Is So Hot, It’s Radioactive

    A horrifying parody of energy drink commercials—and if it has your attention, well, that’s the whole point. As the Fukushima disaster fades from memory, most people don’t... Read more

  • A machine at the Monsanto headquarters is used to test various dosages of Round Up herbicide on weed seedlings grown in a biotechnology lab in St Louis, Mo., on May 21, 2009. (Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

    Monsanto Rejects Finding That Roundup Herbicide Is Carcinogenic

    The World Health Organization said Monsanto’s widely used herbicide Roundup is a carcinogen. The label raises new questions, both about industrial farming practices and about... Read more

  • Carl Vizzone/flickr

    Hormone-Mimickers Widespread in Great Lakes Region Wastewater, Waterways and Fish.

    Larry Barber spent ten years testing water and fish in the Great Lakes region. But he wasn’t looking for the pollutants everyone’s heard of. Mercury... Read more

  • Polar bear and cub. Declining sea ice has made it more difficult for some polar bear populations to find enough food and rear cubs. Photo by: Scott Schliebe/USFWS.

    The Great Arctic Decline: Another Sea Ice Record Broken

    Every winter, sea ice in the Arctic expands, providing vital habitat for birthing seals, hunting polar bears, and foraging walruses. But as the Arctic has... Read more

  • French organic farmer Gwenole Le Roy holds home grown organic carrots on September 9, 2014 on his his farm in Plouescat, western of France. (Fred Tanneau/AFP/Getty Images)

    How to Grow Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting

    If you live anywhere in North America with hard clay soil, you may have given up growing carrots in your garden. The tops may have... Read more

  • "Our study presents the first relatively concrete evidence that mobile and sedentary people came together to build a ceremonial center," says Takeshi Inomata. (Credit: Takeshi Inomata)

    Maya Ceremony Center Built by Farmers and Hunters

    Excavations at the ancient Maya lowlands site of Ceibal in Guatemala suggest that as the society moved from a heavy reliance on foraging to one... Read more

  • A Chinchorro mummy of a child - dated between 5000 B.C. and 3000 B.C. on display at San Miguel de Azapa Museum in Arica, Chile. During the past decade, many of the Chinchorro mummies have begun to rapidly degrade. (Claudio Santana/AFP/Getty Images)

    Case of the Rotting Mummies

    At least 2,000 years before the ancient Egyptians began mummifying their pharaohs, a hunter-gatherer people called the Chinchorro living along the coast of modern-day Chile... Read more

  • Archeologists have excavated hundreds of skeletons at London's Liverpool Street, as part of a dig for the city's new Crossrail line. (AOL Screenshot)

    Hundreds of Skeletons Unearthed at London Construction Site (Video)

    An excavation in London has turned up hundreds of skeletons from a burial ground dating back hundreds of years. It’s the site of the Bedlam burial... Read more

  • A 2.8 million-year-old jawbone could represent the most ancient member of our genus ever discovered. (AOL Screenshot)

    What an Ancient Jawbone Could Tell Us About Human Evolution (Video)

    This ancient jawbone could present an important clue in our understanding of how humans evolved. Researchers found the bone at a dig site in northern... Read more

  • Proto-cuneiform recording the allocation of beer, probably from southern Iraq, Late Prehistoric period, about 3100–3000 B.C. (Jim Kuhn/Wikimedia Commons) Background: Collection of roman amphora, clay vases used for transporting liquids, such as wine or oil. (Shutterstock*)

    Archaeologist Attempts to Revive Lost Alcoholic Beverages From Ancient Recipes and Residues

    An archaeologist working with a brewery is recreating ancient beers from around the world, from places such as Turkey, Egypt, Italy, Denmark, Honduras, and China... Read more

  • The mummy of Buddhist Master Liuquan, shown inside a Buddha statue via scans. (M. Elsevier Stokmans, Courtesy of Drents Museum)

    Mummy Found Inside 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue

    A Buddha statue dating back to the 11th or 12th century was examined by CT scan and endoscopy in the Netherlands late last year, revealing that it... Read more

  • Bronze Age skull from Jericho, Palestine, 2200–2000 B.C. and an early example of trepanation, the oldest form of neurosurgery, which involves drilling into the skull. (Wellcome Images/CC BY 4.0/ Wikimedia Commons)

    Advanced Ancient Knowledge: Brain Surgery 2,500 Years Ago

    How did people in ancient times deal with the health complications that we use advanced techniques to treat today? Many think that ancient folk simply... Read more

  • A file photo of a bronze nugget and an illustration of a sunken city. The legendary metal orichalcum of Atlantis has been thought to be a brass-like alloy. (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Orichalcum: Legendary Metal of Atlantis Found in 2,600-Year-Old Shipwreck

    Legend holds that in very ancient times alongside gold and silver, another precious metal was coveted and mined in Atlantis. That metal was called orichalcum,... Read more

  • Teeming with secrets… (Shutterstock*)

    Scientists Use Physics to Read Scrolls From Herculaneum – but Why Do We Care?

    The recent announcement that European scientists had pioneered a technique for reading papyrus scrolls from Herculaneum without unrolling them attracted widespread attention. At first glance,... Read more

  • A 55,000-year-old skull fragment found in an Israeli cave might mark one of the first areas where modern humans and Neanderthals met. (AOL Screenshot)

    Ancient Skull May Mark Where Humans First Met Neanderthals (Video)

    Scientists are getting closer to finding the time and place where modern humans and Neanderthals first — got it on. A new study in the journal Nature may have... Read more

  • Dashi-Dorzho Itigilov (1852-1927). A mummy in the lotus meditation position found Jan. 27, 2015, in Mongolia is said to possibly be Itigilov. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Mummy Found in Meditation Position: Legendary Mongolian Lama?

    A mummy estimated from preliminary investigations to be about 200 years old, sitting in the lotus meditation position, was found in Mongolia on Jan. 27,... Read more

  • Left: Rama welcomed back to Ayodhya, including the celestial flying machine, the Pushpak Vimana. Right: An illustration of the Shakuna Vimana that is supposed to fly like a bird with hinged wings and tail, drawn in Bangalore, India, in 1923. Background: A file photo of Sanskrit text. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Speakers at Science Congress Say Ancient India Mastered Advanced Space Flight Thousands of Years Ago

    A controversial paper presented at the prestigious science conference, the 102nd Indian Science Congress in Mumbai, claims human aviation and advanced space flight was achieved... Read more

  • Photo provided by Nature Publishing group on Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015 shows close up of Herculaneum Papyrus scroll. Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world’s oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets.  (AP Photo/NPG, Emmanuel Brun)

    X-rays Reveal Secrets of Ancient Scrolls Buried by Volcano

    BERLIN—Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise... Read more

  • Derinkuyu underground city in Turkey. (Shutterstock*)

    Who Built the Underground City of Derinkuyu?

    In the Cappadocia region of Turkey there is a town called Derinkuyu; and beneath Derinkuyu there is a city, vast and deep, of ancient design,... Read more

  • The amulet with the palindrome inscription found in Cyprus. (Marcin Iwan, artifact from the excavations of Jagiellonian University in Krakow at Paphos Agora)

    Ancient Greek Amulet With Strange Palindrome Inscription Discovered in Cyprus

    Archaeologists in Cyprus have unearthed a 1,500-year-old amulet in the ancient city of Nea Paphos in Cyprus, which contains a curious palindrome inscription—a text that... Read more

  • Small cross type penny with portrait of King Ethelred, similar to the ones recently discovered near Lenborough, England. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Hoard of 5,000 Anglo Saxon Coins Worth Over $1.5 M Discovered by Amateur Metal Detectorists

    Amateur treasure hunters struck it rich when they unearthed a massive hoard of more than  5,000 silver coins during a Christmas gathering on farmland near... Read more

  • Lyonnesse

    Britain’s Atlantis, Lyonnesse: The Sunken Land of Arthurian Legend

    Off the coast of Cornwall, at the southern tip of the UK, on a clear day, the Isles of Scilly can be seen at some... Read more

  • Left: A depiction of the Babylonian god Adad. Right: A depiction of the Roman god Janus, who looks both backward and forward. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient History of New Year’s Resolutions

    A New Year’s resolution is a tradition, most common in the West but found around the world, in which a person makes a promise on... Read more

  • A file photo of an Egyptian mummy. (Shutterstock*)

    Art, Meds, and Fuel—The Surprising Historical Uses of Ancient Mummies

    Mummies are a familiar image in modern Western culture, sometimes silently resting in glass museum cases, or other times shuffling along on two cursed feet,... Read more

  • The reptilian creature is believed to have made its home in Scotland some 170 million years ago. (AOL Screenshot)

    It’s Not Nessie, But Jurassic Predator Found in Scotland (Video)

    A giant, ancient, aquatic predator trolling the waters of Scotland — hmm, why does that sound familiar? According to HowStuffWorks: “The Loch Ness is one... Read more


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