Science

The Most Influential Scientist You May Never Have Heard Of

Alexander von Humboldt selfportrait.
Alexander von Humboldt selfportrait.

Gaze at Alexander Von Humboldt’s 1814 self-portrait and you peer into the eyes of a man who sought to see and understand everything. By this...


Most recent Science blogs and columns

  • Untitled

    Watch: NASA Envisions Human Colony on Venus

    [Transcript] While Mars has been the primary target for space exploration, NASA is conducting a study to explore the possible human occupation of Venus’s upper... Read more

  • Ancient ruins in Ashkelon National Park, Israel, and a painting depicting the babies of Roman legend, Romulus and Remus. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Mass Baby Grave Discovered Under Ancient Roman Bathhouse

    Along the shores of Israel’s Mediterranean coast, in the ancient seaport of Ashkelon, archaeologist Ross Voss made a gruesome find. While exploring one of the... Read more

  • (Photo credit should read Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

    Air Pollution Makes Beijing Nearly ‘Uninhabitable for Human Beings’ According to Study

    By Jonathan Benson, contributing writer to Natural News After many days without rain in densely populated places like Los Angeles and New York City, it... Read more

  • A megalith at Baalbek. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Largest Known Ancient Megalith Discovered—Who Really Made It?

    Baalbek is an ancient complex of temples located at an altitude of approximately 3,800 feet (1,150 meters), at the foot of the Anti-Lebanon mountain range... Read more

  • Amazonian Peatlands Store Mega Carbon

        Peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon store ten times the amount of carbon as undisturbed rainforest in adjacent areas, making them critical in the... Read more

  • Deforestation on Amazon Rivers Has Lasting Impacts

    Vast areas of the Amazon forest are being destroyed for agricultural uses, mainly industrial-scale soybean crops, and turned into pasture land for livestock. The riparian... Read more

  • Amy Adams, North Carolina campaign coordinator with Appalachian Voices, shows her hand covered with wet coal ash from the Dan River swirling in the background, in Danville, Va., Feb. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

    Coal Ash Considered Hazardous Waste by Environmentalists, Harmless by EPA

    NASHVILLE, Tenn.—Six years ago, there was a massive spill of coal ash sludge in Tennessee. Three years later, tons of coal ash swept into Lake... Read more

  • Bhangarh ruins (Amlan Mathur/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Ghost City of Bhangarh and the Curse of the Holy Man

    The abandoned fort of Bhangarh is thought to be the most haunted place in India, so much so that the Archaeological Survey of India has... Read more

  • 3-D printed materials that change shape over time. (Dan Raviv)

    Explainer: What Is 4-D Printing?

    Additive manufacturing – or 3-D printing – is 30 years old this year. Today, it’s found not just in industry but in households, as the... Read more

  • A 3-D model of the International Space Station. (Shutterstock*)

    No More Space ‘Race’

    Ellen Stofan, NASA’s chief scientist, saw her first rocket launch at age 4. Her father worked at NASA as an engineer, and the thrill of... Read more

  • Scientists have published a study estimating just how much water exists in the crust of the Earth, and how much hydrogen is being produced by that water. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Estimate Volume of World’s Oldest Water (Video)

    A new study by scientists from the University of Toronto, Princeton University and the University of Oxford changes the estimate of not only much water... Read more

  • A definitive geological timeline from Princeton University researchers shows that a series of massive eruptions 66 million years ago in a primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction. Pictured above are the Deccan Traps near Mahabaleshwar, India. (Gerta Keller/ Department of Geosciences)

    New, Tighter Timeline Confirms Ancient Volcanism Aligned With Dinosaurs’ Extinction

    A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago spewed enormous amounts of climate-altering gases into the atmosphere... Read more

  • Study finds crows spontaneously solve higher-order relational-matching tasks. (Lomonosov Moscow University)

    Crows Are Smarter Than You Think

    Crows have long been heralded for their high intelligence—they can remember faces, use tools, and communicate in sophisticated ways. But a newly published study finds... Read more

  • In space, no one can appreciate your artistic spacecraft rendering. (JAXA)

    After Rosetta, Japanese Mission Aims for an Asteroid in Search of Origins of Earth’s Water

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission to land on comet 67P was one of the most audacious in space history. The idea of landing on... Read more

  • (Sunset and Oil Rig, CC BY 2.0)

    Collapsing Oil Prices to Slow Green Revolution as Energy Costs Plummet

    By J. D. Heyes, contributing writer to Natural News As oil prices tumble — some industry experts say prices could collapse to $40 a barrel... Read more

  • Untitled

    World’s Deepest-Dwelling Fish Discovered

    Many consider the deep-sea just as fascinating and mysterious as space, as we have yet to develop an understanding of the kinds of species that dwell... Read more

  • 3-D printed materials that change shape over time. (Dan Raviv)

    Explainer: What Is 4-D Printing?

    Additive manufacturing – or 3-D printing – is 30 years old this year. Today, it’s found not just in industry but in households, as the... Read more

  • Untitled

    World’s Deepest-Dwelling Fish Discovered

    Many consider the deep-sea just as fascinating and mysterious as space, as we have yet to develop an understanding of the kinds of species that dwell... Read more

  • A guest takes a picture of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) logo during an official ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of CERN in Meyrin near Geneva on September 29, 2014. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

    CERN Nuclear Physics Lab Adds Pakistan as Member

    GENEVA—The world’s top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member. Rolf Heuer, director general of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, known... Read more

  • The three main neuron types in the lateral horn of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster: Inhibitory projection neurons (green) respond to attractive odors; higher-order neurons of the lateral horn (orange) respond to repulsive odors; excitatory projection neurons (magenta) are likely to convey the identity of an odor. The first two neuron types were examined in the study. (Antonia Strutz/MPI Chem. Ecol.)

    How the Brain Can Distinguish Good From Bad Smells

    Whether an odor is pleasant or disgusting to an organism is not just a matter of taste. Often, an organism’s survival depends on its ability... Read more

  • Physics researchers at the University of Michigan have confirmed the strange electrical behavior of a material called samarium hexaboride. The compound, it turns out, is a topological insulator. Gang Li, postdoctoral researcher; Kai Sun, assistant professor; Cagliyan Kurdak, professor; and Lu Li, assistant professor, stand in front of their experimental set-up. (Daryl Marshke/Michigan Photography)

    45-year Physics Mystery Shows a Path to Quantum Transistors

    An odd, iridescent material that’s puzzled physicists for decades turns out to be an exotic state of matter that could open a new path to... Read more

  • Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory study potential of drag-reducing devices on semitrucks to conserve billions of gallons, save tens of billions of dollars and spare tens of millions of tons of CO2. (American Institute of Physics)

    How to Save Billions of Gallons of Gasoline

    Each year, the more than 2 million tractor-trailer trucks that cruise America’s highways consume about 36 billion gallons of diesel fuel, representing more than 10... Read more

  • Ancient Roman concrete consists of coarse chunks of volcanic tuff and brick bound together by a volcanic ash-lime mortar that resists microcracking, a key to its longevity and endurance. (Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab)

    Back to the Future With Roman Architectural Concrete

    No visit to Rome is complete without a visit to the Pantheon, Trajan’s Markets, the Colosseum, or the other spectacular examples of ancient Roman concrete... Read more

  • An electric car is plugged in to a public charging station in El Monte, Calif. on Sept. 22. New legislation signed by California Governor Jerry Brown on Sunday, Sept. 21, supports more electric vehicles on California's roads. (Eric Zhang/Epoch Times)

    Switching to Vehicles Powered by Electricity From Renewables Could Save Lives

    Driving vehicles that use electricity from renewable energy instead of gasoline could reduce the resulting deaths due to air pollution by 70 percent. This finding... Read more

  • bird

    Why Don’t Birds Have Teeth? Scientists Solve Mystery

    [Transcript] “Birds are the modern day ancestors of dinosaurs, but unlike their predecessors, birds no longer have teeth. Until recently, scientists didn’t know when or... Read more

  • Kaku

    Dr. Michio Kaku on Why the Multiverse Has 11 Dimensions

    Video Transcript Andre Lapiere: Are there only three dimensions in other universes or could there be more?  Michio Kaku:  Andre, we believe, though we cannot yet... Read more

  • (Lumina Stock/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Boston Bombing: What 180 Million Tweets Tell Us About Fear

    The 2013 Boston Marathon bombing lit up Twitter with more than 180 million tweets expressing fear, solidarity, and sympathy from people in 95 cities around... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Why a ‘Miracle’ Drug Exists but You Can’t Have It Yet

    It’s supposedly getting easier for innovative drugs for rare diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy to reach the market. So why is hesitancy still proving devastating... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Science Fiction: The Mother of Invention

    Along a busy metropolitan street, people walk—some briskly on their way to work, some on a leisurely stroll—with cell phones to their ears, iPads in... Read more

  • The GhostSwimmer vehicle, an experimental drone from the Navy (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Edward Guttierrez III/Released)

    ‘Shark’ Drone: New Ghostswimmer Unveiled by Navy, Has Shark-Like Fins

    The US Navy has unveiled its latest asset–the Ghostswimmer–after it completed tests this week. The unnmaned underwater vehicle, or drone, looks like a shark in... Read more

  • A worker holds a white rat at a laboratory at the West China Medical School of Sichuan University on Aug. 3, 2005 in Chengdu. (China Photos/Getty Images)

    Scientists Discover Brain Mechanism That Drives Us to Eat Glucose

    Scientists have discovered a mechanism in the brain that may drive our appetite for foods rich in glucose and could lead to treatments for obesity... Read more

  • This tiny slice of silicon, etched in Jelena Vuckovic's lab at Stanford with a pattern that resembles a bar code, is one step on the way toward linking computer components with light instead of wires. (Stanford Vuckovic Lab)

    Stanford Engineers Take Big Step Toward Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

    Using a new algorithm, Stanford engineers can design and build a prism-like silicon structure that can bend light at right angles. The goal is to... Read more

  • A YouTube screenshot shows the alleged UFO in Medellin.

    UFO Sightings: Video Shows Saucer-Shaped Object Over Forest in Columbia

    A resident in Medellin, Colombia, appears to have captured an object in the sky over a forest. The video was uploaded on YouTube a few... Read more

  • "This will be good for items people can relate to: clothing and wearable electronics like smartwatches that configure to your smartphone," says James Tour. (Tour Group/Rice University)

    Laser Burns Perfect ‘Defects’ Into Graphene

    Scientists have created sheets of flexible graphene by burning a cheap polymer with a laser. The result is a jumble of interconnected graphene flakes with... Read more

  • HENDERSON, NV - APRIL 21: Professional Golfer Natalie Gulbis shows the path of her golf swing in a long exposure shot during a Calendar Shoot at the Lake Las Vegas Resort on April 21, 2004 in Henderson Nevada. (Donald Miralle/Getty Images)

    World’s Fastest 2-d Camera May Enable New Scientific Discoveries

    A team of biomedical engineers at Washington University in St. Louis, led byLihong Wang, PhD, the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, has... Read more

  • (AOL screenshot)

    Real-Life Atlantis: Lost Ancient Egyptian City Sunk Underwater Centuries Ago

      Archaeologists have been investigating the lost, ancient city of Thonis-Heracleion, which sunk under the Mediterranean Sea thousands of years ago. It was discovered in... Read more

  • A megalith at Baalbek. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Largest Known Ancient Megalith Discovered—Who Really Made It?

    Baalbek is an ancient complex of temples located at an altitude of approximately 3,800 feet (1,150 meters), at the foot of the Anti-Lebanon mountain range... Read more

  • Bhangarh ruins (Amlan Mathur/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Ghost City of Bhangarh and the Curse of the Holy Man

    The abandoned fort of Bhangarh is thought to be the most haunted place in India, so much so that the Archaeological Survey of India has... Read more

  • Left: An illustration of a giant. (Shutterstock*) Right: A humanoid humerus bone much larger than a normal humerus bone, discovered in France by Georges Vacher de Lapouge. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Did Giants Exist? Part 2: Where Are the Skeletons Now?

    Many newspaper clippings can be found from the 19th century, and trickling on into the 20th century, reporting on the discovery of full skeletons or... Read more

  • Newspaper clippings describe findings of alleged giant bones. Background: Title page of "Jack the Giant Killer." (Wikimedia Commons)

    Did Giants Exist? Part 1: Legends and America’s Giant Skeletons

    So much knowledge has been lost throughout the ages—destroyed by war, natural disasters, human ignorance, or simply by the erosion of time. However, with all... Read more

  • ancient-tech

    6 Advanced Ancient Inventions Beyond Modern Understanding

    We’ve lost the secret to making some of history’s most useful inventions, and for all of our ingenuity and discoveries, our ancestors of thousands of... Read more

  • Left: A file illustration from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: (Shutterstock*)

    Devil’s Hoofprints Spotted in the Snow?

    On Feb. 9, 1855, in the county of Devon, England, residents were mystified when they awoke to find strange tracks in the snow—tracks unlike any... Read more

  • Top: A wooden figure thought by some to be a bird, by some to be a plane, dating from the 3rd century B.C., found in Sakkara (or Saqqara), Egypt. (Dawoud Khalil Messiha/Wikimedia Commons) Bottom: A file photo of pyramids in Egypt. (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Did Ancient Egyptians Have Airplanes? Mechanical Engineer Thinks So

    Oopart (out of place artifact) is a term applied to dozens of prehistoric objects found in various places around the world that seem to show... Read more

  • (Wikimedia Commons; edited by Epoch Times)

    The Lost Continent of Kumari Kandam

    Most people are familiar with the story of Atlantis, the legendary sunken city as described by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. To this day, opinion is... Read more

  • Dr. Jim Tucker (Dan Addison/University of Virginia Public Affairs/Audio Visual Dept.)

    Reincarnation Expert Dr. Jim Tucker Talks ‘Spiritual’ Research in Scientific America

    Dr. Jim Tucker learned from the best. His predecessor in reincarnation studies at the University of Virginia, Dr. Ian Stevenson (1918–2007), earned the respect of... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Why the Most Advanced Computer Is Still No Match for the Human Brain

    It is a humbling thing in this era of advanced science to realize that the human brain remains an enigma.  Furthermore, as we spend millions... Read more

  • An Ulfberht sword displayed at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, Germany. (Martin Kraft/Wikimedia Commons)

    A Step Closer to the Mysterious Origin of the Viking Sword Ulfberht

    Ulfberht was like a Medieval luxury brand for swords—but unlike your Gucci purse, the swords were of such high quality they were almost … mystical... Read more

  • Long Meg and Her Daughters, Eden Valley, Cumbria. (Simon Ledingham/Wikimedia Commons)

    The Legend of the Stone Circle ‘Long Meg and Her Daughters’

    Despite their pervasiveness throughout the world, with thousands scattered across Britain and Europe alone, stone circles never cease to arouse awe and intrigue in those... Read more

  • Detail of a mural from an Eastern Han tomb (25–220 A.D.) at Zhucun, Luoyang, Henan Province, China. The painting utilizes Han purple and Han blue pigments. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Han Purple: A 2,800-Year-Old Artificial Pigment That Quantum Physicists Are Trying to Understand

    Han purple is an artificial pigment created by the Chinese over 2,500 years ago, which was used in wall paintings and to decorate the famous... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Can People Who ‘Remember’ Past-Lives in Ancient Egypt Help Archaeologists?

    We’ve heard of psychics helping police solve crimes, but what about those who say they can remember their ancient past lives—could they help archaeologists solve... Read more

  • Left: Marvelous altar, pictured in the book "Magic, Stage Illusions and Scientific Diversions Including Trick Photography. Right: A file image of an ancient lamp. (Shutterstock; edited by Epoch Times) Background: Gears in a machine. (Shutterstock*)

    Ancient Magic: The Illusions Created in Temples by Amazing Inventions

    Imagine you’re in an ancient temple, dimly lit by rays of sunlight peaking in. A worshipper lights a fire on the altar, and steps back... Read more

  • A village sign in Woolpit, England, depicting the two green children of the 12th century legend. (Wikimedia Commons)

    The Green Children of Woolpit: 12th Century Legend of Visitors From Another World

    The Children of Woolpit is an account dating back to the 12th century, which tells of two children that appeared on the edge of a... Read more

  • Werewolf legends are found in many cultures. One, originating in 16th century Germany, may have developed due to the inhuman acts of a serial killer. Top left: A depiction of Lycaon changing into a wolf as told by the ancient Roman poet Ovid and engraved here by Hendrik Goltzius (1558–1617). Bottom left: A 1722 German woodcut. Right: A detail from a piece of pottery found in Italy dating from ca. 460 B.C. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A full moon in the woods. (John North/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Monster of Bedburg: A Werewolf?

    In 1589, in a small town in Germany not too far from Cologne terrible things were happening. It started with cattle mutilations, and the locals... Read more

  • (Vladislav Ociacia/iStock/Thinkstock)

    Is Stephen Hawking Right? Could AI Lead to the End of Humankind?

    The famous theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has revived the debate on whether our search for improved artificial intelligence will one day lead to thinking machines that will... Read more

  • Illustrations of a Chinese man and a Native American from the 18th or 19th century, artist unknown. Background: Mention of Fusang ("Fousang des Chinois") on a 1792 French world map, in the area of modern British Columbia. (Wikimedia Commons; edited by Epoch Times)

    Did the Ancient Chinese Make Contact With Native Americans?

    It is commonly held that Native Americans are descended from people who traveled across the what is known today as the Bering Strait, between Siberia and Alaska, some... Read more

  • This artist's impression shows schematically the mysterious alignments between the spin axes of quasars and the large-scale structures that they inhabit that observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope have revealed. These alignments are over billions of light-years and are the largest known in the Universe. (ESO/M. Kornmesser)

    Blackholes Align in ‘Spooky’ Way, Showing Great Order of Universe

    When astronomers look at the universe on a grand scale—when they step back to view the arrangement of galaxies on a scale of billions of... Read more

  • Untitled

    Watch: NASA Envisions Human Colony on Venus

    [Transcript] While Mars has been the primary target for space exploration, NASA is conducting a study to explore the possible human occupation of Venus’s upper... Read more

  • A 3-D model of the International Space Station. (Shutterstock*)

    No More Space ‘Race’

    Ellen Stofan, NASA’s chief scientist, saw her first rocket launch at age 4. Her father worked at NASA as an engineer, and the thrill of... Read more

  • In space, no one can appreciate your artistic spacecraft rendering. (JAXA)

    After Rosetta, Japanese Mission Aims for an Asteroid in Search of Origins of Earth’s Water

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission to land on comet 67P was one of the most audacious in space history. The idea of landing on... Read more

  • Scientists and engineers work on a Mars Orbiter vehicle at the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) satellite center in Bangalore on Sept. 11, 2013. India is slowly increasing its technology in space, both for the civilian purposes and increasingly for military purposes. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

    India Augments Its Space Technology

    NEW DELHI—India launched an unmanned rocket into space Thursday morning. At 700 tons, it is the heaviest load India has ever successfully launched with its... Read more

  • The Orion spacecraft, in a protective covering, is returned to the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Dec. 18, 2014. It rocketed into orbit Dec. 5, traveling 3,600 miles into space on an unmanned test flight that proved to be a great success. NASA plans to use future models to help get astronauts to Mars in coming decades. (AP Photo/NASA)

    NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Back in Florida After Test Flight

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—NASA’s experimental Orion spacecraft left Florida by rocket and returned by truck. The capsule arrived back at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Thursday... Read more

  • The artistic concept shows NASA's planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft operating in a new mission profile called K2. Using publicly available data, astronomers have confirmed K2's first exoplanet discovery proving Kepler can still find planets.
(NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T Pyle)

    NASA’s Kepler Reborn, Makes First Exoplanet Find of New Mission

    NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft makes a comeback with the discovery of the first exoplanet found using its new mission — K2. The discovery was made... Read more

  • An Artist's concept of Mercury appearing to undergo a recurring meteor shower, perhaps when its orbit crosses the debris trail left by comet Encke. 
(NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

    MESSENGER Data Suggest Recurring Meteor Shower on Mercury

    The closest planet to the sun appears to get hit by a periodic meteor shower, possibly associated with a comet that produces multiple events annually... Read more

  • Astronomers witnessed the brightest solar flare ever. (NASA/SDO)

    Astronomers Spot Largest, Brightest Solar Flare Ever

    Astronomers at NASA spotted a solar flare from a nearby red dwarf star earlier this year — the largest ever recorded. The flare came from one... Read more

  • Valles Marineris

    Life on Mars? Unexplained Methane ‘Burps’ Detected by Curiosity Rover

    Unexplained methane “burps” have been detected on Mars, a potential sign of life on the planet. NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has detected the spikes of... Read more

  • From our perspective, time is always moving forward, but according to some theoretical research, it might be possible that the Big Bang also created a mirrored universe where time moves backwards relative to our own understanding. (AOL Screenshot)

    There Might Be a Mirror Universe Where Time Moves Backwards (Video)

    From our perspective, time is always moving forward, but according to some theoretical research, it might be possible that the Big Bang also created a... Read more

  • The first definitive detection of Martian organic chemicals in material on the surface of Mars came from analysis by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover of sample powder from this mudstone target, "Cumberland."(NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

    NASA Rover Finds Active and Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

    NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in... Read more

  • NASA’s MAVEN mission is observing the upper atmosphere of Mars to help understand climate change on the planet. MAVEN entered its science phase on Nov. 16, 2014.
(NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

    NASA’s MAVEN Mission Identifies Links in Chain Leading to Atmospheric Loss

    Early discoveries by NASA’s newest Mars orbiter are starting to reveal key features about the loss of the planet’s atmosphere to space over time. The... Read more

  • In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) on July 17, 2014, German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of the Earth. (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)

    Space Wars? Russia Launches Mysterious Object in Orbit, Could be ‘Satellite-Killer’

    An unknown vehicle was launched into orbit, and there’s speculation that it might be a Russian “satellite-killer” controlled by the country’s military. The mysterious object–called... Read more

  • In this file photo dated Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, a combination photo produced with different images taken with the CIVA camera system released by the European Space Agency ESA, shows Rosetta’s lander Philae after landing safely on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko,  as these first  CIVA images confirm. One of the lander’s three feet can be seen in the foreground. Philae became the first spacecraft to land on a comet when it touched down Wednesday on the comet, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. (AP Photo/Esa/Rosetta/Philae, FILE)

    Comet 67P Pictures, Size, Path: New Color Pics Released by European Space Agency

    The Rosetta probe has captured new color pictures of the Comet 67P, also known as the Churymov-Gerasimenko. The comet came into focus when the Rosetta... Read more

  • (NOVAwurks illustration)

    ‘Satlets’ Launch: DARPA to Send Tiny Satellites in Orbit

    Small 15-pound satellites will be launched into orbit by DARPA and its partners. Ultimately, researchers want to use the small devices to cannibalize unused satellites... Read more

  • The alleged UFO sighting near Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano. (http://webcamsdemexico.net/ screenshot)

    UFO Sightings 2014: Another Spotted at Mexico Volcano

    Another UFO was spotted near the Popocatepetl Volcano in Mexico this week. Photos taken Dec.  12 were uploaded online, showing a dark circular dot near... Read more

  • sea

    Richard Branson’s Deep-Sea Exploration Plans Canceled

    [Transcript] “Sir Richard Branson’s plans to explore the world’s deepest oceans have been scrapped. The Virgin Oceanic project was first unveiled in 2011, and planned... Read more

  • An OPALS artists rendition operating from the ISS (NASA/JPL-CALTECH)

    UFO Sightings: International Space Station Red Laser Photo Could Be of New Instrument

    Some enthusiasts have claimed that an object firing a red beam over the Earth captured on video by the International Space Station is a UFO... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Why Big Sand Dunes on Saturn’s Moon Titan Look so Familiar

    The enormous sand dunes on Saturn’s moon Titan show signs of shifting wind conditions over tens of thousands of years—much like large dunes on Earth... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    The Geminids Meteor Shower Should Be One of the Best This Year

    The best meteor shower of the year should put on an impressive display this weekend – weather permitting – with the annual Geminids poised to... Read more

  • (Photo credit should read Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

    Air Pollution Makes Beijing Nearly ‘Uninhabitable for Human Beings’ According to Study

    By Jonathan Benson, contributing writer to Natural News After many days without rain in densely populated places like Los Angeles and New York City, it... Read more

  • Amazonian Peatlands Store Mega Carbon

        Peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon store ten times the amount of carbon as undisturbed rainforest in adjacent areas, making them critical in the... Read more

  • Deforestation on Amazon Rivers Has Lasting Impacts

    Vast areas of the Amazon forest are being destroyed for agricultural uses, mainly industrial-scale soybean crops, and turned into pasture land for livestock. The riparian... Read more

  • Amy Adams, North Carolina campaign coordinator with Appalachian Voices, shows her hand covered with wet coal ash from the Dan River swirling in the background, in Danville, Va., Feb. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

    Coal Ash Considered Hazardous Waste by Environmentalists, Harmless by EPA

    NASHVILLE, Tenn.—Six years ago, there was a massive spill of coal ash sludge in Tennessee. Three years later, tons of coal ash swept into Lake... Read more

  • Scientists have published a study estimating just how much water exists in the crust of the Earth, and how much hydrogen is being produced by that water. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Estimate Volume of World’s Oldest Water (Video)

    A new study by scientists from the University of Toronto, Princeton University and the University of Oxford changes the estimate of not only much water... Read more

  • Study finds crows spontaneously solve higher-order relational-matching tasks. (Lomonosov Moscow University)

    Crows Are Smarter Than You Think

    Crows have long been heralded for their high intelligence—they can remember faces, use tools, and communicate in sophisticated ways. But a newly published study finds... Read more

  • (Sunset and Oil Rig, CC BY 2.0)

    Collapsing Oil Prices to Slow Green Revolution as Energy Costs Plummet

    By J. D. Heyes, contributing writer to Natural News As oil prices tumble — some industry experts say prices could collapse to $40 a barrel... Read more

  • Many species, not just human beings, depend on coral reefs for sustenance and protection. Photo credit: Curt Storlazzi.

    Reefs Reduce 97 Percent of Wave Energy on Coasts

    We have a lot of stake in the coast. Coastal waters are where we host fisheries, build homes and turn to for tourism and recreation... Read more

  • Amazon rainforest canopy in Peru. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

    Growth of Forests Not Equal To Rising CO2 Levels

    Plants rely on three critical elements for growth: carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are therefore expected to increase rates of... Read more

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2014 file photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, a humpback whale breaks the surface in the waters through a school of fish six miles off the coast of New York City. Naturalists aboard whale-watching boats have seen humpbacks in the Atlantic Ocean within a mile of the Rockaway peninsula, part of New York's borough of Queens. Humpback whales, the gigantic, endangered mammals known for their haunting underwater songs, were spotted 87 times from the boats in 2014. That's up from three sightings in 2011.  (AP Photo/Wildlife Conservation Society, Julie Larsen Maher, File)

    Biologist Reveals How Whales May ‘Sing’ for Their Supper

    Humpback whales have a trick or two when it comes to finding a quick snack at the bottom of the ocean. But how they pinpoint... Read more

  • Thunderstorms produce powerful gamma rays, the brightest light naturally produced on earth. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

    NASA’s Fermi Mission Brings Deeper Focus to Thunderstorm Gamma-Rays

    Each day, thunderstorms around the world produce about a thousand quick bursts of gamma rays, some of the highest-energy light naturally found on Earth. By... Read more

  • arctic

    The Artic is Warming Twice as Fast as the Rest of the Planet

    NOAA has put out its annual Arctic Report Card, and the news is startling — Arctic air is warming twice as fast as the rest... Read more

  • Ozone is a toxic component of the smog that blankets Houston, Texas, in this photo from March 25, 2012. Photo by: Kyle Colby Jones.

    Forests Could be a Thrifty Way to Fight Ozone Pollution

    Planting trees may be a cost-effective way to reduce ground-level ozone, a toxic component of smog that contributes to the deaths of about 152,000 people... Read more

  • Semi truck drivers fill up with gas as at a Love's Travel Stop in Napavine, Wash. on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014. Much of Southwest Washington was blanketed in several inches of snow of Thursday causing dozens wrecks along Interstate 5. Bad weather and heavy traffic forced a number of the drivers to break for the night at the Napavine truck stop. (AP Photo/The Chronicle, Pete aster)

    Air Pollution Down Thanks to California’s Regulation of Diesel Trucks

    Ever wonder what’s in the black cloud that emits from some semi trucks that you pass on the freeway? Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab)... Read more

  • Mark Kunze of San Bruno stalls his car in the flooded intersection of Airport Blvd. and Grand Ave. in South San Francisco, on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. Several vehicles stalled in and around the intersection after driving through the deep water. A powerful storm churned through the San Francisco Bay Area on Thursday, knocking out power to tens of thousands and delaying commuters while bringing a soaking of much needed rain.  (AP Photo/Alex Washburn)

    Education Is Key to Climate Adaptation

    Given that some climate change is already unavoidable—as just confirmed by the new IPCC report—investing in empowerment through universal education should be an essential element... Read more

  • The holotype specimen, which scientists used as the basis to describe a new species of poison dart frog: Andinobates geminisae. Photo by: Cesar Jaramillo, STRI.

    Conservation Needed for New Poison Dart Frog Species

      It was a surprising discovery in an unlikely location. In a leaf litter nearly four inches deep under a dense canopy of rainforest trees,... Read more

  • Children Struggle to Clean Oil Spill in Sundarbans

    On December 9th, a tanker slammed into another vessel along the Shela River in the world’s largest mangrove forest: the Sundarbans in Bangladesh. The tanker... Read more

  • A dog scavenges in the polluted waters of the Ganga river at Sangam in Allahabad on April 14, 2013. (Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)

    More Than 5 Trillion Pieces of Plastic in the World’s Oceans

    5.25 trillion — that’s a conservative estimate of just how many pieces of plastic are swirling around the world’s oceans, from microscopic fragments, to giant islands... Read more

  • Angalifu at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Photo by: Sheep81/Public Domain.

    Five White Rhinos Left in the World

    As if news for rhinos couldn’t get any worse: this weekend, Angalifu, died at the San Diego Zoo. Forty four-year-old Angalifu was a male northern... Read more

  • The Peruvian Amazon is home to a vast array of species, such as this Ranitomeya benedicta dart frog. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

    Amazon Forest Protection By Locals Most Effective

    The views of the people who live in forests around the world often get swamped in the debate about how to make the best use... Read more

  • Ancient ruins in Ashkelon National Park, Israel, and a painting depicting the babies of Roman legend, Romulus and Remus. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Mass Baby Grave Discovered Under Ancient Roman Bathhouse

    Along the shores of Israel’s Mediterranean coast, in the ancient seaport of Ashkelon, archaeologist Ross Voss made a gruesome find. While exploring one of the... Read more

  • A megalith at Baalbek. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Largest Known Ancient Megalith Discovered—Who Really Made It?

    Baalbek is an ancient complex of temples located at an altitude of approximately 3,800 feet (1,150 meters), at the foot of the Anti-Lebanon mountain range... Read more

  • A definitive geological timeline from Princeton University researchers shows that a series of massive eruptions 66 million years ago in a primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction. Pictured above are the Deccan Traps near Mahabaleshwar, India. (Gerta Keller/ Department of Geosciences)

    New, Tighter Timeline Confirms Ancient Volcanism Aligned With Dinosaurs’ Extinction

    A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago spewed enormous amounts of climate-altering gases into the atmosphere... Read more

  • ancient-tech

    6 Advanced Ancient Inventions Beyond Modern Understanding

    We’ve lost the secret to making some of history’s most useful inventions, and for all of our ingenuity and discoveries, our ancestors of thousands of... Read more

  • A Mississippi State University team found this bulla, or ancient clay seal, on a dig site in southern Israel last summer. It offers evidence of government activity in the 10th century B.C., a time when many scholars said a kingdom could not exist in the region. (University of Wisconsin/Nathaniel Greene)

    Discovery of Clay Seals Supports Existence of Biblical Kings, David and Solomon

    Six official clay seals found by a Mississippi State University archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of... Read more

  • Top: A wooden figure thought by some to be a bird, by some to be a plane, dating from the 3rd century B.C., found in Sakkara (or Saqqara), Egypt. (Dawoud Khalil Messiha/Wikimedia Commons) Bottom: A file photo of pyramids in Egypt. (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Did Ancient Egyptians Have Airplanes? Mechanical Engineer Thinks So

    Oopart (out of place artifact) is a term applied to dozens of prehistoric objects found in various places around the world that seem to show... Read more

  • Ancient Roman Mosaics in Villa Romana La Olmeda (Wikimedia Commons)

    The Symbol of the Swastika and Its 12,000-Year-Old History

    The swastika is a symbol used by one of the most hated men on Earth, a symbol that represents the slaughter of millions of people... Read more

  • Fossil evidence of the oldest known horned dinosaur ever found in North America has recently been identified by paleontologists. (AOL Screenshot)

    Oldest Horned Dinosaur Species Found in US (Video)

    Dinosaur fossils from millions of years ago are the subject of many scientific studies, and researchers are making new discoveries frequently. Fossil evidence of the... Read more

  • Left: King of Hearts. Right: King of Cups tarot card. (Shutterstock*)

    Did You Ever Notice the King of Hearts Is Committing Suicide? Here’s Why

    Many people know that the playing cards of today are derived from the same roots as the Tarot, but few notice that the King of... Read more

  • Left: Dirk found in France (Wikimedia Commons). Right: Dirk found in the Netherlands (Wikimedia Commons)

    Object Used as Door Stop Identified as Rare 3,500-Year-Old Ceremonial Dagger

    An object pulled up by a plow in a field and used to prop open an office door has now been identified by archaeologists as... Read more

  • An Ulfberht sword displayed at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, Germany. (Martin Kraft/Wikimedia Commons)

    A Step Closer to the Mysterious Origin of the Viking Sword Ulfberht

    Ulfberht was like a Medieval luxury brand for swords—but unlike your Gucci purse, the swords were of such high quality they were almost … mystical... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Brilliant Ancient Battle Tactics With Modern Daily Life Applications

    It’s not that we should necessarily treat the obstacles we encounter in daily life as enemies that must be annihilated—but sometimes ancient battle strategies have... Read more

  • Long Meg and Her Daughters, Eden Valley, Cumbria. (Simon Ledingham/Wikimedia Commons)

    The Legend of the Stone Circle ‘Long Meg and Her Daughters’

    Despite their pervasiveness throughout the world, with thousands scattered across Britain and Europe alone, stone circles never cease to arouse awe and intrigue in those... Read more

  • Background: (Bertrand B/iStock/Thinkstock) Right: (Shutterstock*)

    What Might Archaeologists of the Future Think About Us? Professor Holtorf Imagines …

    Imagine it’s the year 5014 and archaeologists are studying the great ancient civilization of New York City. What might they find? What conclusions could they deduct... Read more

  • Detail of a mural from an Eastern Han tomb (25–220 A.D.) at Zhucun, Luoyang, Henan Province, China. The painting utilizes Han purple and Han blue pigments. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Han Purple: A 2,800-Year-Old Artificial Pigment That Quantum Physicists Are Trying to Understand

    Han purple is an artificial pigment created by the Chinese over 2,500 years ago, which was used in wall paintings and to decorate the famous... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    Can People Who ‘Remember’ Past-Lives in Ancient Egypt Help Archaeologists?

    We’ve heard of psychics helping police solve crimes, but what about those who say they can remember their ancient past lives—could they help archaeologists solve... Read more

  • A 540 thousand year-old art object shows that prehistoric upright walkers may have had quite a bit more going on upstairs than people give them credit for. (AOL Screenshot)

    540,000-Year-Old Artwork Discovered on Shell (Video)

    Humans’ early ancestor, Homo erectus, is generally thought to have been lacking in cognitive abilities. A recent study of mussel shells collected in the late... Read more

  • See the video below outlining studies on Home erectus and these mussel shells. (Screenshot/NWO VenC/YouTube)

    500,000-Year-Old Engraving Found—the Oldest Ever, Say Archaeologists

    An international team of researchers published research on Dec. 3 showing that a 500,000-year-old mussel shell bears the oldest engraving ever found—it’s four times older... Read more

  • Left: Marvelous altar, pictured in the book "Magic, Stage Illusions and Scientific Diversions Including Trick Photography. Right: A file image of an ancient lamp. (Shutterstock; edited by Epoch Times) Background: Gears in a machine. (Shutterstock*)

    Ancient Magic: The Illusions Created in Temples by Amazing Inventions

    Imagine you’re in an ancient temple, dimly lit by rays of sunlight peaking in. A worshipper lights a fire on the altar, and steps back... Read more

  • Werewolf legends are found in many cultures. One, originating in 16th century Germany, may have developed due to the inhuman acts of a serial killer. Top left: A depiction of Lycaon changing into a wolf as told by the ancient Roman poet Ovid and engraved here by Hendrik Goltzius (1558–1617). Bottom left: A 1722 German woodcut. Right: A detail from a piece of pottery found in Italy dating from ca. 460 B.C. (Wikimedia Commons) Background: A full moon in the woods. (John North/iStock/Thinkstock)

    The Monster of Bedburg: A Werewolf?

    In 1589, in a small town in Germany not too far from Cologne terrible things were happening. It started with cattle mutilations, and the locals... Read more


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