Science

Survival in Hottest Sea May Be Death Trap for Coral

Most corals fall victim to bleaching at water temperatures above 32 degrees Celsius. But, corals from the Persian/Arabian Gulf region survive summer peak temperatures of up to 35 degrees Celsius on a regular basis. (the_tahoe_guy/Flickr, CC BY 2.0)
Most corals fall victim to bleaching at water temperatures above 32 degrees Celsius. But, corals from the Persian/Arabian Gulf region survive summer peak temperatures of up to 35 degrees Celsius on a regular basis. (the_tahoe_guy/Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world’s hottest sea could actually contribute to their demise. A new study shows that local...


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  • NAIROBI, KENYA - DECEMBER 10: A female Black Rhino stands on December 10, 2007 in the Masai Mara Game Reserve, Kenya. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

    Decline in Large Herbivores May Lead to Barren Landscapes

    Herbivores or plant eating animals are found on every continent of the earth other than Antarctica. Among these, the number of known land herbivore species... Read more

  • OK, but which sea’s level? And how do you know what it is? (Oleg Brovko, CC BY-SA 2.0)

    Explainer: How Do You Measure a Sea’s Level, Anyway?

    There are about 330 million cubic miles of water in the world oceans today, 97% of all the water on the planet. Early in our... Read more

  • "This finding suggests that atmospheric BPA releases may contaminate local surface water, leading to greater exposure of humans or wildlife," says Don Tillitt. (zabava_t/iStock)

    BPA in the Air May Pollute Nearby Water

    Past studies have found that municipal or industrial wastewater has put harmful concentrations of Bisphenol-A (BPA), a hormone-disrupting chemical used in things like plastic food... Read more

  • Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of an irrigation canal on April 23, 2015 in Firebaugh, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

    California’s Water Paradox: Why Enough Will Never Be Enough

    These days, it seems everyone is looking for a silver bullet solution to California’s drought. Some advocate increasing supply through more storage, desalination or water... Read more

  • French President Francois Hollande, right, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel attend the Petersberg Climate Dialogue conference in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. The international meeting on climate protection is being held in preparation for the United Nations Climate Change Conference later this year in Paris. (Tobias Schwarz/Pool Photo via AP)

    Merkel, Hollande Commit to Global Climate Protection

    BERLIN— German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande confirmed their commitment to fighting global warning Tuesday, gathering with others in Berlin to prepare... Read more

  • The study focuses on the environmental fate of trenbolone acetate, or TBA, a highly potent synthetic analogue of testosterone, used to promote weight gain in beef cattle. (Adrian Byrne/Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

    Hormones for Cattle Stick Around in Streams

    Scientists expect potentially harmful growth-promoting hormones given to cattle will persist in the environment at higher concentrations and for longer durations than previously thought. “What... Read more

  • Ash column from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 from the southwest. Mount Adams is in the background. (USGS)

    Mount St Helens Eruption, Exactly What Happened 35 Years Ago (Photos, Video)

    The violent eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was not a one day event. For two months magma had been accumulating below the volcano,... Read more

  • A teak tree in flower. Photo by: Challiyan.

    Restoring Teak Forests Using Genetic Analysis

    Teak (Tectona grandis) is one of the most valued tropical hardwoods for its beauty, durability, and versatility. Teak trees naturally occur in the Indo-Pacific region,... Read more

  • Chukchi, where the proposed exporatory drilling is to take place, is home to about 2,000 polar bears. The species is currently declining as global warming melts the sea ice on which it depends. Photo by Arturo de Frias Marques.

    Conditional Approval Granted for Offshore Arctic Drilling

    Earlier this week, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) approved Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc.’s multi-year Exploration Plan for the Chukchi Sea off the... Read more

  • news.monagabay.com

    Wildlife Trade Network New Target for Weapons Trafficking

    An outfit usually associated with investigating arms dealers and weapons traffickers is applying its advanced network mapping capabilities to criminal wildlife trafficking syndicates. This week... Read more

  • VORTEX ONSHORE

    Bladeless Turbines Could Revolutionize the Way Wind Energy Is Produced

    In the new millennium, wind turbines are a fixture of the countryside, dotting the green hills that flank the roads and highways. These latter-day obelisks... Read more

  • 15-092

    A Giant 12,000-Year-Old Ice Shelf in Antarctica Could Melt By 2020 (Video)

    The Larsen B Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which suffered a partial collapse in 2002, is rapidly disintegrating and is expected to melt completely by 2020,... Read more

  • Mount St. Helens spews smoke, soot and ash into the sky in Washington state following a major eruption on May 18, 1980. May 18, 2015 (AP/Jack Smith,)

    A Look Back 35 Years After Mount St. Helens’ Deadly Eruption

    SEATTLE—Thirty-five years ago, Mount St. Helens in southwest Washington state erupted, killing 57 people, blasting more than 1,300 feet off the top and raining volcanic... Read more

  • A high profile pledge by the world's largest meat company to limit deforestation for cattle production in the Amazon appears to be working, resulting in a dramatic increase in compliance with environmental registries and reduced forest clearing among supplier ranches, finds a comprehensive study published in the journal Conservation Letters.

    Zero Deforestation Commitments Bearing Fruit in the Amazon

    A high profile pledge by the world’s largest meat company to limit deforestation for cattle production in the Amazon appears to be working, resulting in... Read more

  • Wildlife trophy room. (Fabio Venni/Creative Commons 2.0)

    South African Airways Bans All Wildlife Trophies from Flights

    Trophy hunters may need to find another flight home, as South African Airlines (SAA) has announced a new ban on any wildlife trophies from their... Read more

  • (Screenshot/Stony Brook University/YouTube)

    3.3-Million-Year-Old Stone Tools Push Back Archaeological Record by a Whopping 700,000 Years

    Archaeologists have discovered the earliest stone tools found to date. The West Turkana Archaeological Project made the announcement in a paper to be published May 21... Read more

  • Right: Gorgon (Andrea Astes/iStock) Background: Chavin de Huantar ruins in Peru, where one researcher says the mythical home of the ancient Greek Gorgon may have been. (Sharon odb/Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient Greek Legend Seems to Describe a Place in Peru: Early Contact?

    In the 8th century B.C., the Greek poet Hesiod described in his “Theogony” a place at the end of the Earth where the gorgons dwell,... Read more

  • Gold that Columbus found in the Americas seems to have come from West Africa, one indication among several that a West African expedition may have preceded him. Left: Christopher Columbus, painted by Sebastiano del Piombo, 1519. Right: Mansa Musa, a 14th century ruler of the Mali Empire as depicted in the Catalan Atlas, 1375. Background: Uruguay is highlighted on a map of South America. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Inscriptions on Uruguay Coast Suggest West Africans Beat Columbus to Americas

    Archaeoastronomer William James Veall scoured satellite images of Uruguay’s coastline, discovering a mass of inscriptions carved into the surface of a 2.3-mile (4,700-meter) long, white, crystalline rock formation... Read more

  • View of the Genghis Khan statue from the observation deck carved into the horse’s mane at Tsonjin Boldog. (Giannella M. Garrett)

    An Ancient Mystery: Where Is the Tomb of Genghis Khan?

    Recently, a magnificent find by archeologists yielded a structure lost to time, a military stronghold used by Genghis Khan and his army as they conquered... Read more

  • Illustration of a Native American woman ( Jozef Klopacka/iStock) Viking ship replica (Sylphe_7/iStock)

    Did a Native American Travel With the Vikings and Arrive in Iceland Centuries Before Columbus Set Sail?

    Scientists have been searching for answers to the puzzles of history by sifting through the genetic code of certain Icelanders. They have been looking to see... Read more

  • Matsya protecting Svayambhuva Manu and the seven sages at the time of the great deluge, a painting by Ramanarayanadatta astir. (Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons)

    Startling Similarity Between Noah Flood Story and Indian Legend of Manu

    In 1872, amateur Assyriologist George Smith made a discovery that would shock the world. While studying a particular tablet from the ancient Mesopotamian city of... Read more

  • Easter Island's moai statues. (Christian Wilkinson/iStock)

    Mystery of Giant Easter Island Hats Solved?

    Archaeologists have long debated how the ancient inhabitants of Easter Island managed to balance a separate piece of stone on top of the heads of... Read more

  • Many bronze mirrors of ancient China and Japan, like this one, functioned normally. But in rare cases, they had the strange property of seeming both solid and transparent at the same time! (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Ancient Wonders: The Secret of Real-Life Magic Mirrors in the Far East

    The Chinese and Japanese have long held as precious rare mirrors that seem to magically be at the same time solid bronze and to let light shine... Read more

  • A cuniform tablet similar to this one on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art rails against poor customer service, a perennial problem. (Wikimedia Commons)

    4,000-Year-Old Ancient Babylonian Tablet Is Oldest Customer Service Complaint Ever Discovered

    A clay tablet from ancient Babylon reveals that no matter where (or when) you go, good customer service can be hard find. So it was... Read more

  • Petroglyphs found in Arizona that show ancient Chinese script. (Courtesy of John Ruskamp)

    New Evidence Ancient Chinese Explorers Landed in America Excites Experts

    John A. Ruskamp Jr., Ed.D., reports that he has identified an outstanding, history-changing treasure hidden in plain sight. High above a walking path in Albuquerque’s... Read more

  • A portrait of Genghis Khan by an anonymous court painter. (Wikimedia Commons; background stone wall: Dmitriy Lesnyak/iStock/Thinkstock)

    An Ancient Mystery: Where Is the Tomb of Genghis Khan?

    Earlier this year, a magnificent find by archaeologists yielded a structure lost to time, a military stronghold used by Genghis Khan and his army as... Read more

  • According to a recently published paper, paleontologists in China have discovered a new species of bird that is dated to be around 130.7 million years old and represents the earliest known ancestor to modern birds. (AOL Screenshot)

    Modern Birds’ Oldest Known Ancestor Found in China (Video)

    The oldest known bird species from which all current ones have descended has been found in China. It is estimated to have lived approximately 130.7... Read more

  • Russia-Microchip-Sea-Lily

    Is This Really a 250-Million-Year-Old Microchip?

    In the past month, articles have been circulating on Internet forums and blogs stating that a 250-million-year-old microchip was found in Labinsk, Russia, and that the... Read more

  • Paleontologists have recently announced the discovery of a new winged dinosaur in China named “Yi qi” meaning “strange wing”; it is estimated to be around 160 million years old. (AOL Screenshot)

    Winged Dinosaur Discovered in China (Video)

    Despite the numerous dinosaur discoveries that have been made, paleontologists continue to unearth new species. Now, a  winged dinosaur  found in China has been added... Read more

  • What’s in a name anyway? (Charles R Knight, Wikimedia Commons)

    Why Brontosaurus Is No Longer a Dirty Word for Dinosaur Hunters

    A team of palaeontologists is claiming to have “resurrected” Brontosaurus, the famous long-necked, pot-belled dinosaur. No, they haven’t conducted some mad DNA cloning experiment. They... Read more

  • Archaeologists digging in Tulln, Austria discovered an approximately 300-year-old full camel skeleton, the first of its kind to turn up in central Europe. (AOL Screenshot)

    300-Year-Old Camel Skeleton Found Buried Beneath Cellar in Austria (Video)

    Back in the days when the Ottoman Empire was sending its armies far and wide to claim more territory, troops often traveled with camels specially... Read more

  • A 508-million-year-old arthropod is thought to share a common ancestor with spiders and scorpions. (AOL Screenshot)

    New Arthropod Fossil Might be Relative of Spiders, Scorpions (Video)

    Paleontologists have discovered the fossilized remains of a new arthropod. Yawunik kootenayi was swimming around oceans in Canada in the Cambrian period, 508 million years... Read more

  • "Our study presents the first relatively concrete evidence that mobile and sedentary people came together to build a ceremonial center," says Takeshi Inomata. (Credit: Takeshi Inomata)

    Maya Ceremony Center Built by Farmers and Hunters

    Excavations at the ancient Maya lowlands site of Ceibal in Guatemala suggest that as the society moved from a heavy reliance on foraging to one... Read more

  • A Chinchorro mummy of a child - dated between 5000 B.C. and 3000 B.C. on display at San Miguel de Azapa Museum in Arica, Chile. During the past decade, many of the Chinchorro mummies have begun to rapidly degrade. (Claudio Santana/AFP/Getty Images)

    Case of the Rotting Mummies

    At least 2,000 years before the ancient Egyptians began mummifying their pharaohs, a hunter-gatherer people called the Chinchorro living along the coast of modern-day Chile... Read more

  • Archeologists have excavated hundreds of skeletons at London's Liverpool Street, as part of a dig for the city's new Crossrail line. (AOL Screenshot)

    Hundreds of Skeletons Unearthed at London Construction Site (Video)

    An excavation in London has turned up hundreds of skeletons from a burial ground dating back hundreds of years. It’s the site of the Bedlam burial... Read more


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