Science

Woman Defeats Mine, Saves Wilderness, Wins $175,000

Marilyn Baptiste, 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize winner for North America, led the Xeni Gwet'in community in defeating one of the largest proposed gold and copper mines in British Columbia that would have destroyed Fish Lake—a source of spiritual identity and livelihood for the Xeni Gwet’in. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.
Marilyn Baptiste, 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize winner for North America, led the Xeni Gwet'in community in defeating one of the largest proposed gold and copper mines in British Columbia that would have destroyed Fish Lake—a source of spiritual identity and livelihood for the Xeni Gwet’in. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.

When a huge open-pit mine threatened a pristine lake and surrounding forest in British Columbia, Canada, Marilyn Baptiste jumped into action, spearheading efforts to collect...


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  • Farmer waters his vegetables on a two acre parcel at Ogonowski Farm in Dracut, Mass., shortly after sunrise, Wednesday July 7, 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    Is Land Fertilized With Sewage Sludge Harmful?

    Did you know that some American farms use sewage sludge to fertilize their crops? According to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), about half of the... Read more

  • Discarded remains of an immature crowned eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus) found in a hunting camp in the Ebo forest. Photo credit: Robin Whytock / ZSSD

    Commercial Bushmeat Hunting Pressuring Birds in Africa

    While conducting a bird survey in the Ebo Forest Reserve of Cameroon, Scottish ornithologist Robin Whytock noted two uncommon forest raptors in a camp regularly... Read more

  • B161529_november-carrots-300x208_bigblogofgardening.com

    Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting

    If you live anywhere in North America with hard clay soil, you may have given up growing carrots in your garden. The tops may have grown... Read more

  • In this file photo, around 310,000 attendees were at the People's Climate March in Manhattan, New York, Sept. 21, 2014. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Why Do Major US Corporations Want to Address Climate Change?

    Environmentalists aren’t the only ones who want the Earth to be a greener place. On Wednesday, a group of representatives from major U.S. corporations lobbied... Read more

  • Fields of carrots are watered near where the California Aqueduct flows through Kern County, the nation's number 2 crop county, some twenty five miles south of Bakersfield, California on March 29, 2015 (FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

    California’s Water Problems Aren’t Just About Drought

    As California’s drought pushes through its fourth year, the solutions being pitched for the state’s water shortage problem have become progressively more radical. In San... Read more

  • Like a lot of people, I think of Earth Day as Earth’s Birthday. (Utomo Hendra Saputra/Unsplash, CC BY 1.0)

    Let’s Make Earth Day About Earth, Not Us

    Today is Earth Day, but it’s one of the most confused and misguided celebratory days of the year. The UN refers to this day as... Read more

  • Rabbits tagged by the USGS, in an effort to determine if pythons are responsible for dwindling numbers. Within days, all the tagged rabbits were found in python stomachs. (USGS)

    Burmese Pythons in the Everglades: How Serious Is the Threat?

    Scientists and wildlife managers face daunting challenges with how to handle an invasive reptile in the Everglades National Park, Florida. Believed to number up to... Read more

  • "Projections of more wildfires in the West mean that we need to account for this source of carbon emissions. Meeting the state greenhouse gas targets for 2020 might require a reconsideration of wildland management policies," says John Battles. (US Department of Agriculture/CC BY 2.0)

    Wildfires in California Spew Greenhouse Gas

    Wildfires in California emit more greenhouse gas than previously believed, according to a new study that quantifies the amount of carbon stored and released through... Read more

  • In this Aug. 2, 2003 file photo, a bumblebee sits atop a gray-headed coneflower in Dauphin, Pa. A common pesticide is dramatically harming wild bees, according to a new in-the-field study that outside experts say may shift the way the U.S. government looks at a controversial class of chemicals. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    Common Pesticide Widely Killing Wild Bees, Study Shows

    WASHINGTON—A common type of pesticide is dramatically harming wild bees, according to a new in-the-field study that outside experts say may help shift the way... Read more

  • Leaping Polar Bear in Svalbard, Norway, 2008. (Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson)

    The Last Polar Bears

    We first went to Churchill in Manitoba, Canada, to see its famous polar bears, whose lives were being threatened by the vagaries of a civilization,... Read more

  • Wooden fishing rigs off Java's coast. Photo: Rhett A. Butler

    Indonesia Asked to Give Fisherman Help with Net Transition

    On Sunday, the Indonesian ombudsman asked the maritime affairs minister to help fishermen adapt to the government ban on seine and trawl fishing implemented in January.  “We... Read more

  • (eluxemagazine)

    The Low Carb Collection by Reformation

    Like any Californian cool girls, the women behind the eco-friendly fashion brand Reformation count their carbs religiously. But not the kinds of carbs you’d imagine. These freewheelin’... Read more

  • A tree tagged "DEAD TREE" in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, on April 15, 2015. The city is still dealing with dead tree removal three years since Superstorm Sandy. (Christine Lin/ Epoch Times)

    Why Some New Yorkers Won’t See Green Trees This Spring

    It’s mid-April and the trees should have sprouted green buds by now, but in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, spring looks apocalyptic. Three years ago, Superstorm Sandy... Read more

  • Surging demand for natural rubber is decimating some of the world's most endangered forests, putting wildlife and critical ecosystem services at risk, warn scientists writing in the journal Conservation Letters.

    Deforestation Driven by Demand for Natural Rubber

    Surging demand for natural rubber is decimating some of the world’s most endangered forests, putting wildlife and critical ecosystem services at risk, warn scientists writing... Read more

  • Andean community leaders show hydrologists and project developers from Lima damaged amunas. These pre-Incan canals collect excess river water in the wet season so it can recharge pools and groundwater supplies for use in the dry season. Credit: Gena Gammie.

    Lima to Restore Pre-Incan Aqueducts to Alleviate Water Crisis

    To tackle a looming water crisis, the city of Lima, Peru, is planning a series of green infrastructure projects, including the restoration of an ancient... Read more

  • Forest along an Amazon tributary near where the controversial Cacao del Peru Norte cocoa plantation is being developed. Photo by Morgan Erickson-Davis.

    Deforestation for Chocolate Legal in Peru

    A regional court in Loreto, Peru recently ruled that the clearing of more than 2,000 hectares of forest by Cacao del Peru Norte for a... Read more

  • Frightened and malnourished female elephant calf in an enclosure in Zimbabwe prior to exportation to China. Photo courtesy of ELEPHANTS DC.

    Zimbabwe Selling Baby Elephant Calves to China

    A hundred thousand African elephants were killed by poachers for their ivory between 2010 and 2012. Now a new threat looms: a growing wildlife trade... Read more

  • Members of a women's group in Nduruma, Tanzania, stand over their zero-energy cool chamber, or ZECC. ZECCs can extend the life of fresh produce by a few days up to two weeks. Credit: Rachel Cernansky.

    Tanzanian Farmers Trained in Crop Preservation

    Outside Halima Sama’s house, children run around the dirt compound, kicking up the dust that blankets the region during the dry season. Nduruma, like many... Read more

  • A traditional fishing vessel in Indonesia. Photo: Andreas Harsono

    Fishing in Indonesia No Longer using Trawling or Seine Nets

    Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo will form a special task force to deal with fishermen’s concerns about the new ban on trawlers and seine nets. ... Read more

  • What’s in a name anyway? (Charles R Knight, Wikimedia Commons)

    Why Brontosaurus Is No Longer a Dirty Word for Dinosaur Hunters

    A team of palaeontologists is claiming to have “resurrected” Brontosaurus, the famous long-necked, pot-belled dinosaur. No, they haven’t conducted some mad DNA cloning experiment. They... Read more

  • Archaeologists digging in Tulln, Austria discovered an approximately 300-year-old full camel skeleton, the first of its kind to turn up in central Europe. (AOL Screenshot)

    300-Year-Old Camel Skeleton Found Buried Beneath Cellar in Austria (Video)

    Back in the days when the Ottoman Empire was sending its armies far and wide to claim more territory, troops often traveled with camels specially... Read more

  • A 508-million-year-old arthropod is thought to share a common ancestor with spiders and scorpions. (AOL Screenshot)

    New Arthropod Fossil Might be Relative of Spiders, Scorpions (Video)

    Paleontologists have discovered the fossilized remains of a new arthropod. Yawunik kootenayi was swimming around oceans in Canada in the Cambrian period, 508 million years... Read more

  • "Our study presents the first relatively concrete evidence that mobile and sedentary people came together to build a ceremonial center," says Takeshi Inomata. (Credit: Takeshi Inomata)

    Maya Ceremony Center Built by Farmers and Hunters

    Excavations at the ancient Maya lowlands site of Ceibal in Guatemala suggest that as the society moved from a heavy reliance on foraging to one... Read more

  • A Chinchorro mummy of a child - dated between 5000 B.C. and 3000 B.C. on display at San Miguel de Azapa Museum in Arica, Chile. During the past decade, many of the Chinchorro mummies have begun to rapidly degrade. (Claudio Santana/AFP/Getty Images)

    Case of the Rotting Mummies

    At least 2,000 years before the ancient Egyptians began mummifying their pharaohs, a hunter-gatherer people called the Chinchorro living along the coast of modern-day Chile... Read more

  • Archeologists have excavated hundreds of skeletons at London's Liverpool Street, as part of a dig for the city's new Crossrail line. (AOL Screenshot)

    Hundreds of Skeletons Unearthed at London Construction Site (Video)

    An excavation in London has turned up hundreds of skeletons from a burial ground dating back hundreds of years. It’s the site of the Bedlam burial... Read more

  • A 2.8 million-year-old jawbone could represent the most ancient member of our genus ever discovered. (AOL Screenshot)

    What an Ancient Jawbone Could Tell Us About Human Evolution (Video)

    This ancient jawbone could present an important clue in our understanding of how humans evolved. Researchers found the bone at a dig site in northern... Read more

  • Proto-cuneiform recording the allocation of beer, probably from southern Iraq, Late Prehistoric period, about 3100–3000 B.C. (Jim Kuhn/Wikimedia Commons) Background: Collection of roman amphora, clay vases used for transporting liquids, such as wine or oil. (Shutterstock*)

    Archaeologist Attempts to Revive Lost Alcoholic Beverages From Ancient Recipes and Residues

    An archaeologist working with a brewery is recreating ancient beers from around the world, from places such as Turkey, Egypt, Italy, Denmark, Honduras, and China... Read more

  • The mummy of Buddhist Master Liuquan, shown inside a Buddha statue via scans. (M. Elsevier Stokmans, Courtesy of Drents Museum)

    Mummy Found Inside 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue

    A Buddha statue dating back to the 11th or 12th century was examined by CT scan and endoscopy in the Netherlands late last year, revealing that it... Read more

  • Bronze Age skull from Jericho, Palestine, 2200–2000 B.C. and an early example of trepanation, the oldest form of neurosurgery, which involves drilling into the skull. (Wellcome Images/CC BY 4.0/ Wikimedia Commons)

    Advanced Ancient Knowledge: Brain Surgery 2,500 Years Ago

    How did people in ancient times deal with the health complications that we use advanced techniques to treat today? Many think that ancient folk simply... Read more

  • A file photo of a bronze nugget and an illustration of a sunken city. The legendary metal orichalcum of Atlantis has been thought to be a brass-like alloy. (Shutterstock*; edited by Epoch Times)

    Orichalcum: Legendary Metal of Atlantis Found in 2,600-Year-Old Shipwreck

    Legend holds that in very ancient times alongside gold and silver, another precious metal was coveted and mined in Atlantis. That metal was called orichalcum,... Read more

  • Teeming with secrets… (Shutterstock*)

    Scientists Use Physics to Read Scrolls From Herculaneum – but Why Do We Care?

    The recent announcement that European scientists had pioneered a technique for reading papyrus scrolls from Herculaneum without unrolling them attracted widespread attention. At first glance,... Read more

  • A 55,000-year-old skull fragment found in an Israeli cave might mark one of the first areas where modern humans and Neanderthals met. (AOL Screenshot)

    Ancient Skull May Mark Where Humans First Met Neanderthals (Video)

    Scientists are getting closer to finding the time and place where modern humans and Neanderthals first — got it on. A new study in the journal Nature may have... Read more

  • Dashi-Dorzho Itigilov (1852-1927). A mummy in the lotus meditation position found Jan. 27, 2015, in Mongolia is said to possibly be Itigilov. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Mummy Found in Meditation Position: Legendary Mongolian Lama?

    A mummy estimated from preliminary investigations to be about 200 years old, sitting in the lotus meditation position, was found in Mongolia on Jan. 27,... Read more

  • Left: Rama welcomed back to Ayodhya, including the celestial flying machine, the Pushpak Vimana. Right: An illustration of the Shakuna Vimana that is supposed to fly like a bird with hinged wings and tail, drawn in Bangalore, India, in 1923. Background: A file photo of Sanskrit text. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Speakers at Science Congress Say Ancient India Mastered Advanced Space Flight Thousands of Years Ago

    A controversial paper presented at the prestigious science conference, the 102nd Indian Science Congress in Mumbai, claims human aviation and advanced space flight was achieved... Read more

  • Photo provided by Nature Publishing group on Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015 shows close up of Herculaneum Papyrus scroll. Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world’s oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets.  (AP Photo/NPG, Emmanuel Brun)

    X-rays Reveal Secrets of Ancient Scrolls Buried by Volcano

    BERLIN—Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise... Read more

  • Derinkuyu underground city in Turkey. (Shutterstock*)

    Who Built the Underground City of Derinkuyu?

    In the Cappadocia region of Turkey there is a town called Derinkuyu; and beneath Derinkuyu there is a city, vast and deep, of ancient design,... Read more

  • The amulet with the palindrome inscription found in Cyprus. (Marcin Iwan, artifact from the excavations of Jagiellonian University in Krakow at Paphos Agora)

    Ancient Greek Amulet With Strange Palindrome Inscription Discovered in Cyprus

    Archaeologists in Cyprus have unearthed a 1,500-year-old amulet in the ancient city of Nea Paphos in Cyprus, which contains a curious palindrome inscription—a text that... Read more

  • Small cross type penny with portrait of King Ethelred, similar to the ones recently discovered near Lenborough, England. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Hoard of 5,000 Anglo Saxon Coins Worth Over $1.5 M Discovered by Amateur Metal Detectorists

    Amateur treasure hunters struck it rich when they unearthed a massive hoard of more than  5,000 silver coins during a Christmas gathering on farmland near... Read more

  • Lyonnesse

    Britain’s Atlantis, Lyonnesse: The Sunken Land of Arthurian Legend

    Off the coast of Cornwall, at the southern tip of the UK, on a clear day, the Isles of Scilly can be seen at some... Read more


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