Science News

Stable or in Flux? How Anxiety Can Botch Decisions

"Our findings help explain why anxious individuals may find decision-making under uncertainty hard as they struggle to pick up on clues as to whether they are in a stable or changing situation," says Sonia Bishop. (Dominic Alves, CC BY)
"Our findings help explain why anxious individuals may find decision-making under uncertainty hard as they struggle to pick up on clues as to whether they are in a stable or changing situation," says Sonia Bishop. (Dominic Alves, CC BY)

When things get unpredictable, people prone to high anxiety may have a harder time reading the environmental cues that could help them avoid a bad...




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  • Scientists at Duke University have successfully isolated a gene sequence integral to human brain development and implanted it in a mouse embryo, causing its brain to grow bigger in the areas controlling higher level functions. (AOL Screenshot)

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