Science News

Incredible Death Valley Mystery Finally Solved (Video)

Paleobiologist Richard Norris and his team have solved the mystery behind the sailing stones in California's Death Valley. (AOL Screenshot)
Paleobiologist Richard Norris and his team have solved the mystery behind the sailing stones in California's Death Valley. (AOL Screenshot)

A mystery in Death Valley National Park that has puzzled scientists and park visitors for decades has finally been solved. Across a dry lake in...




  • Ten-year-old Noah Cordle says at first he thought it was a crab that hit his foot while he was walking on a New Jersey Beach, but it was actually a 10,000-year-old arrowhead. (AOL Screenshot)

    Boy Finds 10,000-Year-Old Arrowhead (Video)

    A ten-year-old boy playing on a New Jersey beach has unearthed a 10,000-year-old arrowhead possibly used by ancient Native Americans to spear fish or hunt... Read more

  • Stonehenge

    15 Previously Unknown Monuments Discovered Underground in Stonehenge Landscape

    A groundbreaking new survey of Stonehenge and its surrounds has revealed fifteen previously unknown Neolithic monuments underground, according to a new report released by the... Read more

  • Researchers in Britain, working with experts at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria have created the first underground survey of Stonehenge. (AOL Screenshot)

    Scientists Look for Clues Underneath Stonehenge (Video)

    There are many mysteries surrounding the ancient monuments at Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England. Researchers in Britain, working with experts at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for... Read more

  • (Shutterstock*)

    This Could Explain Why Older Adults Can’t Sleep

    A loss of neurons in a part of the brain that serves as an on/off switch for sleep may explain why so many older adults... Read more

  • Main image: Sunset over Lands End in Cornwall. (Shutterstock*); Top left: Wondering rabbit (ForestWander via Wikimedia Commons)

    Ancient Relics Unearthed by Rabbits Leads to Discovery of Treasure Trove

    In February last year, a family of rabbits won some favor amongst archaeologists in England when they dug up an ancient artifact in Cornwall. Researchers... Read more

  • What is laughter, after all?(Caroline, CC BY)

    The Science of Laughter

    Laughter is a part of our basic human nature. By embracing laughter, you give yourself permission to relax and look at life with a more... Read more

  • Dodder Plant

    New Findings on How Plants ‘Talk’ to Each Other: Virginia Tech Scientist

    Two plants can communicate with each other by swapping messenger molecules, according to new findings by a Virginia Tech scientist. Jim Westwood, a professor of... Read more

  • This photo released by NASA shows a view of Mars that was stitched together by images taken by NASA’s Viking Orbiter spacecraft. The space agency is planning to send a spacecraft similar to the Curiosity rover to the red planet in 2020. A NASA-appointed team released a report on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 that described the mission’s science goals. (AP Photo/NASA)

    Mars-Moon Hoax: Decade-Old ‘Twin Moons’ Rumor Says Mars will be as big Moon on August 27

    A rumor being spread on social media sites is claiming Mars will be be as big as the moon on August 27, 2014, but it’s... Read more

  • TO GO WITH STORY BY FRANK JORDANS EUROPE NEANDERTHALS - FILE - This Jan. 8, 2003 file photo shows a reconstructed Neanderthal skeleton, right, and a modern human version of a skeleton, left, on display at the Museum of Natural History in New York.  Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research. Using new carbon dating techniques and mathematical models, the researchers examined about 200 samples found at 40 sites from Spain to Russia.  (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, FILE)

    Neanderthals, Humans Coexisted for 5000 Years,Could Have Interbred

    BERLIN—Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according... Read more

  • Main Image: Jade discs, from China, that resemble modern-day CD's or donuts, and date to the late Neolithic Period, Liangzhu culture (3300-2250 BC), on display at the Smithsonian's Freer and Sackler galleries in Washington, D.C. (Screenshot/National Geographic/YouTube); Left: Two Jade discs. (Hiart via wikimedia commons).

    The Mysterious Origin of The Jade Discs

    In ancient China, dating back to at least 5,000 BC, large stone discs were placed on the bodies of Chinese aristocrats. Their original function still... Read more

  • Bristlecone Pines

    World’s Oldest Trees: 3,000 to 9,500 Years Old

    Many a tree has quietly, peacefully stood watching the changes of the Earth for thousands of years. Some of them are giants, declaring clearly their... Read more

  • Background: Vintage art showing drawings by Leonardo Da Vinci. (Shutterstock*) Bottom right: Drawing of Leonardo Da Vinci's water lifting devices. (Sailko via wikimedia commons)

    More Than 50 Ancient Greek Inventions Brought to Life Through Incredible Reconstructions

    A new museum dedicated to the advanced technological inventions of ancient Greek scientist Archimedes, has just opened up in Ancient Olympia, Greece, according to a... Read more

  • In this Oct. 1, 2013, photo third grade teacher Melissa Grieshober teaches a math lesson at Silver Lake Elementary School in Middletown, Del. Sometime in elementary school, you quit counting your fingers and just know the answer. Now scientists have put youngsters into brain scanners to find out why, and watched how the brain reorganizes itself as kids learn math. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

    Brain Scan Shows How Kids Learn Math Skills

    WASHINGTON—Sometime in elementary school, you quit counting your fingers and just know the answer. Now scientists have put youngsters into brain scanners to find out... Read more

  • Colin Gagich and Dominik Kaukinen (R), two McMaster University mechatronics students, are the makers of the physical HitchBOT. (David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

    Charming Hitchhiking Robot Nears Its Final Destination

    TORONTO—He has dipped his boots in Lake Superior, crashed a wedding and attended an Aboriginal powwow. A talking, bucket-bodied robot has enthralled Canadians since it... Read more

  • "The goal is to find ways to produce some of the world's largest-volume chemicals from a sustainable carbon source that the Earth not only has in excess but urgently needs to reduce," says Tayhas Palmore. (Shutterstock*)

    Copper Foam Could Make Extra CO2 Useful

    A catalyst made from a foamy form of copper has vastly different electrochemical properties from catalysts made with smooth copper in reactions involving carbon dioxide,... Read more

  • "You can imagine a folded sheet of some material and popping in defects to make a stiff shield, or somehow deploying an object and giving it a rigid backbone," says Itai Cohen. (Jesse Silverberg/Cornell)

    Origami Could Let Engineers Create ‘Transformers’

    Researchers have discovered how to use a well-known origami folding pattern called the Miura-ori to control fundamental physical properties of any thin sheet of material... Read more


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