×
Education

Music Could Help Babies Learn Speech

beach life -funny kid Drumming on the beach
beach life -funny kid Drumming on the beach

Babies who engage in musical play may have an easier time picking up language skills, a study has suggested. US researchers compared 9-month-old babies who...




  • (YouTube)

    Texas Officer Who Body-Slammed 12-Year-Old Student Fired

    The Texas school officer who body-slammed a 12-year-old student has been fired. On April 11, the San Antonio Independent School District (SAISD) announced its termination of Officer Joshua Kehm’s employment... Read more

  • Sixty-three percent of students who started college in 2003-04 and defaulted on their loans by 2009 were college dropouts, while students with a bachelor’s or associate degree were only 4 percent of defaults. (Intellistudies/iStock)

    The History of Student Loans Goes Back to the Middle Ages

    In 1473, Alexander Hardynge, who had finished his bachelor’s degree at Oxford nearly two years previous, borrowed money through an educational loan service. The loan... Read more

  • (YouTube)

    Texas School Officer on Paid Leave After Body Slamming a Student

    A Texas school officer has been placed on paid leave after body slamming a 12-year-old student. A San Antonio Rhodes Middle School student, Janissa Valdez, was thrown to... Read more

  • In this March 17, 2011, file photo, Cans of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke sit in a cooler in Anne's Deli in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo)

    Weird Science Behind Viral Video: Opening a Soda on the Ocean Floor

    This may be one of the visually least impressive videos that gathered over 7 million views on Youtube. But even more than three years after... Read more

  • Alexandra Elbakyan on June 12, 2010. (Apneet Jolly/Flickr)

    Student From Kazakhstan Challenges Academic Publishing Giants

    A master’s student from Kazakhstan is challenging copyright infringement with her database of academic journal articles.  Since 2011, Alexandra Elbakyan, 27, has operated Sci-Hub, an online database of nearly... Read more

  • In this Tuesday, March 8, 2016 photo, teacher Steve Shin sings with students during a music class at Stevenson Middle School in East Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Christine Armario)

    In Hollywood’s Backyard, a Push to Rectify Arts Inequities

    LOS ANGELES — Miles from the Hollywood Walk of Fame and the red carpet, Steve Shin belts out tunes on a piano scarred with nicks... Read more

  • Sean 'P.Diddy' Combs and actress Cassie Venturaattends at the premiere of 'The Perfect Match' in Hollywood, March 7. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

    Sean ‘P.Diddy’ Combs Opens New School in Harlem

    Sean ‘P.Diddy’ Combs has been behind the success of several musicians—now he is taking on the role of building successful students, with the opening of... Read more

  • What makes gifted kids from advantaged families get ahead? (David Woo, CC BY-ND 2.0)

    A Nation at Risk—How Gifted, Low-Income Kids Are Left Behind

    In 1983, the National Commission on Excellence in Education published “A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform,” which documented widespread academic underachievement at... Read more

  • The dreaded CSS Alabama. (McMullen via Wikimedia Commons)

    How British Businesses Helped the Confederacy Fight the American Civil War

    The American Civil War devastated the US, but it also had serious consequences for the world beyond. Among them was the Lancashire cotton famine, which... Read more

  • Princeton University mathematics professor Andrew John Wiles poses next to "Fermat's Last Theorem" written on a chalkboard in his Princeton, N.J., office Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1998. Wiles, 44, a native of Cambridge, England, was awarded the $200,000 1998 King Faisal International Prize for solving the 350-year-old mathematical puzzle that scores of mathematicians could not. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Math Professor Wins $700,000 for Solving 300-Year-Old Theorem

    British mathematician Sir Andrew J. Wiles has won the Abel Prize in math for cracking a centuries-old hypothesis. The Abel Prize comes with a $710,000... Read more

  • Dorothy L. Liggett  tosses her graduation cap into the air after receiving her belated high school diploma on her 93rd birthday on Wednesday, March 9, 2016, in Fairlawn, Ohio. She was joined by her children John Huston (left), Carol Weiner, Donald Huston, Diane Bailey and Jan Larkin for the celebration.  Liggett was a few weeks from graduation from Akron's North High School in 1942 when officials discovered she was married. Liggett and her late husband, John Huston, ran away to Kentucky to get married after her husband was called into the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. (Michael Chritton/Akron Beacon Journal via AP)  MANDATORY CREDIT

    93-Year-Old Ohio Woman Receives High School Diploma

    Dorothy Louise Liggett has lived through World War II and the Cold War, has read a biography or autobiography on nearly every United States president and each’s spouse, and has... Read more

  • Alexis Lemaire, 24, posing in front of a blackboard in Reims, France, 20 December 2004 after he set a new world record as he became the first person to figure out the 13th root of a 200-digit number by mental arithmetic alone. (FRANCOIS NASCIMBENI/AFP/Getty Images)

    Survey: 1 out of 5 Adults Have Forgotten How to Do Fractions or Percentages

    At least a fifth of adults have forgotten how to perform basic mathematical equations taught in school, according to a new survey.  One in five... Read more

  • photo-1437751068958-82e6fccc9360

    Whether Stored Electronically or Written on Calf Skin, Knowledge Has Never Been More Threatened

    Information is constantly under attack. The current debate around the longstanding use of vellum (a parchment made using calf skin) for printing key legislative documents... Read more

  • Young Roma children count with their fingers during a preschool class in the abjectly poor Roma settlement of Ponorata, Romania, on Sept. 10, 2013. A Romanian NGO called OvidiuRo, co-founded by Leslie Hawke, who is the mother of American actor Ethan Hawke, is attempting to get young Roma children to regularly attend pre-school through a coupon incentive system for food at Ponorata and 23 other Roma communities across Romania. Between 400 and 500 Roma live in squalor at Ponorata, few have access to electricity and 95% of them are illiterate and unemployed. Many Roma from Ponorata have spent time in France to earn money, mostly through begging and scrap metal collection. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

    If Education Is the Cure for Poverty, Then How Do We Make the Antidote?

    The United Nations recently claimed that the Millennium Development Goal that focused on primary education increased global enrollment from 83 percent to 91 percent. Despite these... Read more

  • Is it worth all this? (Michaeljung/iStock)

    Here’s the Real Reason Teachers Are Quitting (It’s Not Just the Money)

    Michael Wilshaw, the chief inspector of schools in England, has complained about a “brain drain” of teachers leaving the country to work abroad—and, as a teacher... Read more

  • Manning Hall, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, on November 8, 2009 (Chen Siyuan/Wikicommons)

    Brown University Students Say They’re ‘Failing Classes’ From Stress of Activism Work

    Student activists at Brown University are pressuring school administrators to make it easier for activists to skip or delay classwork so that they can devote... Read more


  • Top