Health News

WHO: Ebola Responsible for 4,877 Deaths

Barbara Smith, a nurse with Mount Sinai Health System, demonstrates to health care professionals how to properly put on protective medical gear when working with someone infected with the ebola virus at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on Oct. 21, 2014, in New York City. The outfit includes two pairs of gloves, mesh breathing mask, protective hood, plastic face shield, booties, liquid resistant gown and sanitizer. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
Barbara Smith, a nurse with Mount Sinai Health System, demonstrates to health care professionals how to properly put on protective medical gear when working with someone infected with the ebola virus at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on Oct. 21, 2014, in New York City. The outfit includes two pairs of gloves, mesh breathing mask, protective hood, plastic face shield, booties, liquid resistant gown and sanitizer. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

LONDON—Ebola is now believed to have killed 4,877 people globally and that the spread of the lethal virus remains “persistent and widespread” in West Africa,...




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