Chinese Culture

Chinese Character for White: Bái (白)

The Chinese character 白 (bái) stands for the colour white. It also refers to being pure, clean, unblemished, and bright, or being clear and plain.  (Epoch Times)
The Chinese character 白 (bái) stands for the colour white. It also refers to being pure, clean, unblemished, and bright, or being clear and plain. (Epoch Times)

The Chinese character 白 (bái) stands for the colour white. It also conveys the meanings of being pure, clean, unblemished, and bright, or being clear...




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