Fine Arts

Art of Zhen Shan Ren Museum Opens in Arizona

museum3

TEMPE, Ariz.—”The Art of Zhen Shan Ren International Exhibition” received acclaim in 900 cities and 50 countries as it toured across Europe, the Americas, Australia,...




  • "The North Cape by Moonlight," 1848, by Peder Balke. Oil on canvas, private collection, Oslo. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

    Maverick Norwegian Artist Peder Balke Rediscovered

    NEW YORK—”The beauty of nature takes the leading role,” wrote the Norwegian artist Peder Balke (1804–1887) about his journey to Finnmark. The northernmost point of... Read more

  • Wall Painting with Scene from the Sacrifice of Iphigeneia. Fresco on plaster, ca. 62 AD, from Pompeii. Casa del Poeta Tragico Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli. (Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli / Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo)

    Ancient Greece Gives Us ‘A World of Emotions’

    NEW YORK—”Think of your father.” These words bring the Greek war hero Achilles to tears when the Trojan king, Priam, requests the delivery of his... Read more

  • (shutterstock)

    14 Artists Break Down the Creative Process

    The act of creation—making something from nothing—is remarkable. Survey after survey reveals what a valued trait creativity is to us today, and scholars strive to... Read more

  • Colleen Barry, artist and curator, prepares the "Self Portrait" exhibition at Eleventh Street Arts gallery in Long Island City, New York on April 19, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

    Self-Portraits: Meeting the Artist Eye-to-Eye

    NEW YORK—We see others differently from how they see themselves. Artists’ self-portraits bridge that inevitable gap to some degree—forthrightly only in rare instances. Not only do... Read more

  • A woman looks at "The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula," 1610, by Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi, Italian, 1571–1610). Oil on canvas, Intesa Sanpaolo Collection, Palazzo Zevallos Stigliano, Naples. (Milene Fernandez/The Epoch Times)

    Caravaggio’s Last Two Paintings Reunited at The Met

    NEW YORK—Expressions of denial, guilt, and regret are written all over the faces of the main figures in the last two works of the Italian... Read more

  • (L to R) John Haldane, J. Newton Rayzor, Sr. Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Baylor University; Mark Johnston, Henry Putnam University Professor of Philosophy​, Princeton University; Sir Roger Scruton, Writer and Philosopher, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center, Washington D.C.; Alicja Gescinska, Philosopher and Novelist; Daniel Cullen, Professor of Political Science, Rhodes College, at the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions event, "The Achievements of Sir Roger Scruton," in Princeton University, on April 3, 2017. (Sameer A. Khan)

    Celebrating the Philosopher of Beauty

    PRINCETON, N.J.—If you care about beauty in art, music, and architecture; if you are looking for consolation in the world; if you want to learn... Read more

  • Chariot Model (Modern Replica) China, original: Qin dynasty (221–206 B.C.),
bronze with pigments
chariot box, including axles: width 53 1/2 inches, depth 25 inches, weight 220.5 pounds; canopy: height 4 inches, diameter 49 1/2 inches; weight 66 pounds; each horse: height 36 1/2 inches, weight 13 1/2 inches, length 46 1/2 inches, Emperor Qinshihuang's Mausoleum Site Museum. (Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

    Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties

    NEW YORK—In ancient times, the people of China believed their culture was divinely inspired. The elegant works of art and exquisitely made objects displayed in... Read more

  • Iconic poster of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin with a little girl named Gelya. The poster was used as propaganda to  show the dictator as a father to his people. In fact, Stalin most likely had both of Gelya's parents killed. (Courtesy of William Vollinger)

    The Reality of Soviet Art

    LONDON, U.K.—The Royal Academy’s Russian Revolution exhibition is vast and complicated. A realist painting of Stalin, glorified, stares from a wall in the first room... Read more

  • “Portrait of a Man with a Cast in his Eye,” (Detail) 1521, by Lucas van Leiden (circa 1494–1533, The Netherlands). Charcoal and black chalk, with traces of white chalk, Nationalmuseum, Sweden. (Milene Fernandez/Epoch Times)

    The Masters’ Thread: How the Engraver’s Mark Inspires Colleen Barry

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread” (ept.ms/mastersthread), artists share their thoughts about how masterpieces inspire their current work. I am trying to understand how to... Read more

  • "Island Pagoda," from the book, "Foochow and the River Min," circa 1873, by John Thomson. Carbon print. (Courtesy of Stephan Loewentheil Historical Photography of China Collection)

    Glimpses of a Lost World Through Early Chinese Photography

    NEW YORK—Two men clad in leather and fur stand side by side with their legs wide and firmly planted on the ground, next to a... Read more

  • Three children, dead from starvation, in November or December of 1921 in Russia. (Fridtjof Nansen)

    Why Do We Find Communist Art So Acceptable?

    Despite the untold horrors and cruelties of communist movements, it seems that some of our social institutions still don’t get it. As I write this... Read more

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    A Resurgence of Art

    NEW YORK—There’s a group of artists who most of the general public has yet to know exist. These are highly skilled painters, sculptors, and draftsmen trained... Read more

  • “Woman in Grecian Gown,” (detail) circa 1894, by Abbott Handerson Thayer (1849–1921) Oil and resin on canvas, glue lined, 54 inches by 38 inches. (Addison Gallery of American Art)

    The Masters’ Thread: How Thayer Inspires Jennifer Gennari

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread” (ept.ms/mastersthread), artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. Although many artists, both living... Read more

  • This painting by Henri Felix Emmanuel Philippoteaux (1815–1884) depicts Lamartine, a reformist, before the Hôtel de Ville in Paris, rejecting the Red Flag on Feb. 25, 1848. The red flag represents terror, blood, and a "party's republic," Lamartine told the crowd. (Public Domain)

    Of ‘-isms,’ Institutions, and Radicals

    For many centuries, classical Western art was transmitted from generation to generation. Masters passed down their skills to disciples, who eventually became masters themselves, and... Read more

  • A landscape of Moscow architecture with the Borodinsky bridge, old classical buildings and modern city skyscrapers. (Dmitry Polonskiy/Shutterstock)

    Communism and Culture: Ugly, Sterile Buildings

    In the 1920s and ’30s, the “intelligentsia” in Europe and the liberal left in the United States became smitten with socialism and the grand Soviet... Read more

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    The Art of Architecture Celebrated at Eleventh Street Arts

    NEW YORK—Since the Renaissance, architecture has been called the mother of all the arts. Traditionally, architects had to master all of the other artistic skills of... Read more

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