Arts & Culture

Luminous J. M. W. Turner Paintings in Fresh Context at The Frick

"Harbor of Dieppe: Changement de Domicile," exhibited 1825, but subsequently dated 1826, by J.M.W. Turner.
Oil on canvas, 68 3/8 inches by 88 3/4 inches,
The Frick Collection (Michael Bodycomb)
"Harbor of Dieppe: Changement de Domicile," exhibited 1825, but subsequently dated 1826, by J.M.W. Turner. Oil on canvas, 68 3/8 inches by 88 3/4 inches, The Frick Collection (Michael Bodycomb)

NEW YORK—Land and sea, sky and sun, fascinated the great British painter, Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775–1851). He traveled incessantly to ports and harbors to...


  • (L-R) Rannveig Marta Sarc on violin, Clara Abel on cello, and Chloé Thominet on viola perform at a Groupmuse house concert in Harlem, New York, on Feb. 17, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Entrepeneur: Classics Anchor Us in This Transient World

    People show up at an apartment, some strangers and some friends. At first there’s the typical uncomfortable ice waiting to be broken. Soon people gather... Read more

  • Orchestre National de Lyon and eminent baritone Thomas Hampson who narrated the first piece of the evening, “Antar.” (Pete Checchia)

    Leonard Slatkin and the Orchestre National de Lyon at Carnegie Hall

    NEW YORK—The Orchestre National de Lyon appeared at Carnegie Hall with the help of three talented Americans: Leonard Slatkin, who has been its music director... Read more

  • Diana Damrau is splendid in her made scene as Elvira in Bellini's I Puritani. (Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera)

    Opera Review: ‘I Puritani’

    NEW YORK—Vincenzo Bellini’s “I Puritani” has an absurd plot, taken from a French play derived from a novel by Sir Walter Scott. Like Donizetti’s “Lucia... Read more

  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780 - 1867) 
Comtesse d’Haussonville, 1845
oil on canvas
51 7/8 in. x 36 1/4 in. (131.76 cm x 92.08 cm)
Purchased by The Frick Collection, 1927.
Accession number: 1927.1.81

    The Masters’ Thread: How Ingres Inspires Brendan Johnston

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread” (ept.ms/mastersthread), artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780–1867) is a hero of... Read more

  • 013010-beethoven-cello-sonatas029

    CMS Artistic Director Wu Han on Chamber Music’s Popularity and Accessibility

    NEW YORK—”I have to say, from where I’m sitting, I think chamber music is more popular than ever,” said pianist Wu Han, who is co-artistic... Read more

  • Tatsuo Imaishi at the restoration shop of Rare Violins of New York in Manhattan, New York, on Jan. 9, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Preserving the Legacy of the Luthiers

    NEW YORK—Thinking about investing in a Stradivarius or a Guarneri del Gesù? Well, sound is the very last thing you should consider.  When determining the... Read more

  • Monroe never performed in a formal theatre production, despite many key people in her life encouraging her to do so. (CC0 1.0)

    Would Marilyn Monroe’s Career (And Life) Have Been Different If She Had Acted on Stage?

    On their first evening together, four years before they married, Arthur Miller encouraged Marilyn Monroe to pursue a career on the stage. It was something... Read more

  • Author and humorist Stuart McLean is presented with the Officer of the Order of Canada medal by Gov. Gen. David Johnston in Ottawa on Sept. 28, 2012. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand)

    Stuart McLean: A Beacon of Canadian Class

    With Stuart McLean’s death last week, Canadians bade farewell to the “Vinyl Cafe,” a radio show that was as enlightening as it was endearing. A... Read more

  • (L–R) Matthew Broderick, Annapurna Sriram, Michael Tucker, John Epperson, in Wallace Shawn’s “Evening at the Talk House.” The world has changed since these theater folk last got together. (Monique Carboni)

    Theater Review: ‘Evening at the Talk House’

    NEW YORK—The most insidious societal changes don’t occur through quick or violent means. Rather they are so quiet and unobtrusive one never notices them until... Read more

  • Ellen Sauerbrey, head of the United States Department of State's Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration during the George W. Bush administration and a former U.S. ambassador, enjoyed the performance of Shen Yun Performing Arts at The Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore on Feb. 18, 2017. (Epoch Times)

    Shen Yun Truly Beautiful, Says Ellen Sauerbrey, Former Assistant Secretary of State

    BALTIMORE—Ellen Sauerbrey, the former head of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, was in for a treat when she saw... Read more

  • (Phillip Merry/axolotl photography)

    The Bookbinder: Bringing a Book to Life

    There’s something magical about theater—seeing a world being created and brought to life in front of your eyes, with real objects and real people who... Read more

  • Alla Francesca. (Calain Genuys)

    Louise Basbas on Curating Thousands of Years of Music Before 1800

    NEW YORK—Early music is a bit like musical archaeology: uncovering dusty Bach scores forgotten on the shelves, unearthing tomes of music scores untouched for centuries and buried... Read more

  • Kristine Opolais in the title role of Dvořák's Rusalka. (Ken Howard/ Metropolitan Opera)

    Opera Review: ‘Rusalka’

    NEW YORK—Antonin Dvorak (1841–1904) wrote 10 operas, but only one became popular around the world: “Rusalka.” It took almost a century for the work, which premiered... Read more

  • (TenThing)

    10-piece Brass Ensemble Reimagines Musical Favorites

    A decade ago, Norwegian classical trumpet soloist Tine Thing Helseth and three friends she’d met in school—all trumpet players, all girls—decided that they were having... Read more

  • A concert at El Palau de la Musica in Barcelona, Spain, on July 18, 2016. (David Ramos/Getty Images)

    Sound and Space: Our Acoustic Perception of the World

    Sound is an ephemeral, invisible—but vital—component to any space. It, too, is shaped by design. Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa notably wrote on the sensory experience... Read more

  • Using startling imagery of huge boulders and a whole house hoisted above the characters, Walt Spangler's set for "Desire Under the Elms" portends the doom resulting from heavy sins. (Courtesy of Walt Spangler)

    The Theatrical Art of Designing Space

    Most of us never think about how space is designed in buildings, but a theatrical set design is, by its very nature, there for its... Read more

  • (L-R) Rannveig Marta Sarc on violin, Clara Abel on cello, and Chloé Thominet on viola perform at a Groupmuse house concert in Harlem, New York, on Feb. 17, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Entrepeneur: Classics Anchor Us in This Transient World

    People show up at an apartment, some strangers and some friends. At first there’s the typical uncomfortable ice waiting to be broken. Soon people gather... Read more

  • Orchestre National de Lyon and eminent baritone Thomas Hampson who narrated the first piece of the evening, “Antar.” (Pete Checchia)

    Leonard Slatkin and the Orchestre National de Lyon at Carnegie Hall

    NEW YORK—The Orchestre National de Lyon appeared at Carnegie Hall with the help of three talented Americans: Leonard Slatkin, who has been its music director... Read more

  • Diana Damrau is splendid in her made scene as Elvira in Bellini's I Puritani. (Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera)

    Opera Review: ‘I Puritani’

    NEW YORK—Vincenzo Bellini’s “I Puritani” has an absurd plot, taken from a French play derived from a novel by Sir Walter Scott. Like Donizetti’s “Lucia... Read more

  • 013010-beethoven-cello-sonatas029

    CMS Artistic Director Wu Han on Chamber Music’s Popularity and Accessibility

    NEW YORK—”I have to say, from where I’m sitting, I think chamber music is more popular than ever,” said pianist Wu Han, who is co-artistic... Read more

  • Tatsuo Imaishi at the restoration shop of Rare Violins of New York in Manhattan, New York, on Jan. 9, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Preserving the Legacy of the Luthiers

    NEW YORK—Thinking about investing in a Stradivarius or a Guarneri del Gesù? Well, sound is the very last thing you should consider.  When determining the... Read more

  • Author and humorist Stuart McLean is presented with the Officer of the Order of Canada medal by Gov. Gen. David Johnston in Ottawa on Sept. 28, 2012. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand)

    Stuart McLean: A Beacon of Canadian Class

    With Stuart McLean’s death last week, Canadians bade farewell to the “Vinyl Cafe,” a radio show that was as enlightening as it was endearing. A... Read more

  • (L–R) Matthew Broderick, Annapurna Sriram, Michael Tucker, John Epperson, in Wallace Shawn’s “Evening at the Talk House.” The world has changed since these theater folk last got together. (Monique Carboni)

    Theater Review: ‘Evening at the Talk House’

    NEW YORK—The most insidious societal changes don’t occur through quick or violent means. Rather they are so quiet and unobtrusive one never notices them until... Read more

  • Ellen Sauerbrey, head of the United States Department of State's Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration during the George W. Bush administration and a former U.S. ambassador, enjoyed the performance of Shen Yun Performing Arts at The Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore on Feb. 18, 2017. (Epoch Times)

    Shen Yun Truly Beautiful, Says Ellen Sauerbrey, Former Assistant Secretary of State

    BALTIMORE—Ellen Sauerbrey, the former head of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, was in for a treat when she saw... Read more

  • (Phillip Merry/axolotl photography)

    The Bookbinder: Bringing a Book to Life

    There’s something magical about theater—seeing a world being created and brought to life in front of your eyes, with real objects and real people who... Read more

  • Alla Francesca. (Calain Genuys)

    Louise Basbas on Curating Thousands of Years of Music Before 1800

    NEW YORK—Early music is a bit like musical archaeology: uncovering dusty Bach scores forgotten on the shelves, unearthing tomes of music scores untouched for centuries and buried... Read more

  • Kristine Opolais in the title role of Dvořák's Rusalka. (Ken Howard/ Metropolitan Opera)

    Opera Review: ‘Rusalka’

    NEW YORK—Antonin Dvorak (1841–1904) wrote 10 operas, but only one became popular around the world: “Rusalka.” It took almost a century for the work, which premiered... Read more

  • (TenThing)

    10-piece Brass Ensemble Reimagines Musical Favorites

    A decade ago, Norwegian classical trumpet soloist Tine Thing Helseth and three friends she’d met in school—all trumpet players, all girls—decided that they were having... Read more

  • A concert at El Palau de la Musica in Barcelona, Spain, on July 18, 2016. (David Ramos/Getty Images)

    Sound and Space: Our Acoustic Perception of the World

    Sound is an ephemeral, invisible—but vital—component to any space. It, too, is shaped by design. Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa notably wrote on the sensory experience... Read more

  • Using startling imagery of huge boulders and a whole house hoisted above the characters, Walt Spangler's set for "Desire Under the Elms" portends the doom resulting from heavy sins. (Courtesy of Walt Spangler)

    The Theatrical Art of Designing Space

    Most of us never think about how space is designed in buildings, but a theatrical set design is, by its very nature, there for its... Read more

  • Lucia (Annie Dow) and Abel (Eddie Martinez) in Tanya Saracho's “Fade.” (James Leynse)

    Theater Review: ‘Fade’

    NEW YORK—Playwright Tanya Saracho has taken on the provocative topics of ethnicity and class in her 100-minute two-hander “Fade,” now playing at New York’s Cherry... Read more

  • (L–R) Kyle Scatliffe as Jim and Nicholas Barasch as Huck, in the musical “Big River,” based on Mark Twain’s novel “Huckleberry Finn.” (Joan Marcus)

    Theater Review: ‘Big River’

    NEW YORK—”Human beings can be so cruel to each other” notes young Huckleberry Finn in Encores! revival of the 1985 Broadway musical “Big River.” Though... Read more

  • (Jerris Madison)

    Dianne Reeves Ushers in Valentine’s Day

    NEW YORK—Dianne Reeves is the preeminent jazz singer of our time. Whether in intimate clubs or concert halls, she always impresses with her plush voice,... Read more

  • (L-R) Ain Anger as Hagen, Ileana Montalbetti as Gutrune, Andreas Schager as Siegfried, and Martin Gantner as Gunther in the Canadian Opera Company’s 2017 production of "Götterdämmerung." Director Tim Albery has set the epic story in the corporate world to better resonate with modern audiences.(Michael Cooper)

    The Power of Wagner’s Epic Operas

    TORONTO—There’s something about Wagner’s operas. It’s a feeling that’s hard to explain, keeping you on the edge of your seat, breathlessly hanging on to every... Read more

  • Violinist and composer Michelle Ross at Salmagundi Art Club in Manhattan, New York, on Jan. 30, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Michelle Ross: Rejuvenating Our Modern Society Through Traditional Arts

    NEW YORK—Classical violinist and composer Michelle Ross works surrounded by paintings, as the only musician among a group of visual artists. When she composes, she... Read more

  • Shen Yun Performing Arts North America Company's curtain call at the Cleveland State Theatre, on Feb. 5, 2017. (Epoch Times)

    Film Director: Shen Yun Consistently Shows a Way Toward Peace on Earth

    CLEVELAND—For film director and producer Lief Bristow, Shen Yun is a reminder that peace is possible in the world. “When you watch a show like... Read more

  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780 - 1867) 
Comtesse d’Haussonville, 1845
oil on canvas
51 7/8 in. x 36 1/4 in. (131.76 cm x 92.08 cm)
Purchased by The Frick Collection, 1927.
Accession number: 1927.1.81

    The Masters’ Thread: How Ingres Inspires Brendan Johnston

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread” (ept.ms/mastersthread), artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780–1867) is a hero of... Read more

  • Penn Station, New York, circa 1911. (Public domain)

    The Grand Gateway in Waiting: Envisioning the New-Old Penn Station

    NEW YORK—Nostalgia and heartbreak for the original Pennsylvania Station has persisted since it was destroyed over half a century ago. The beauty of that beaux-arts... Read more

  • Richard Cameron, architectural designer and co-founder of Atelier & Co. in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on Jan. 19, 2017. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Affirming the Art in Architecture

    NEW YORK—When Richard Cameron shows up at a meeting with a portfolio full of handmade drawings, people are almost flabbergasted. The drawings almost take on... Read more

  • "The Triumph of Venus,"  1740, by François Boucher (French, 1703–1770). Oil on canvas. (Nationalmuseum of Sweden)

    Exquisite Art Chosen by a Man of Great Taste

    NEW YORK—A politician, courtier, diplomat, artist, writer, historian, philosopher, and art collector, the Swedish Count Carl Gustaf Tessin (1695–1770) was multitalented but apparently not skilled in... Read more

  • Mandy Hallenius in front of her paintings at an exhibit. (Courtesy of Mandy Hallenius)

    Art Educator Mandy Hallenius: Classical Training in Art Opens Creative Choices

    Mandy Hallenius, an artist and art teacher, says children can master the skills needed to draw or paint whatever they can imagine. To help children... Read more

  • “Still Life with a Pewter Flagon and Two Ming Bowls,” 1651, by Jan Jansz. Treck (circa 1606–1652). Oil on canvas, 30 by 25 inches. (The National Gallery, London)

    The Masters’ Thread: How Jan Jansz. Treck Inspires Carlos Madrid

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread” (ept.ms/mastersthread), artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. I draw inspiration from the... Read more

  • Frederic Chopin at 25, by his fiancée Maria Wodzińska, (Public Domain)

    A Rare, Unknown Photo of Frederic Chopin Probably Found

    WARSAW, Poland—Poland’s culture institute in France says it believes a previously unknown photograph of Polish composer and pianist Frederic Chopin has probably been found by... Read more

  • Burton Silverman talks about his art and life in his studio at his home in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York on December 20, 2016 (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    The Spark and Wisdom of Artist Burton Silverman

    NEW YORK—As his photo was being taken, Burton Silverman instinctively held on to a bunch of his paintbrushes with a relaxed, yet determined grip—the way... Read more

  • Portrait of Herman Doomer, 1640, by Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, Leiden 1606–1669 Amsterdam).  Oil on wood, 29 5/8 by 21 3/4 inches. H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

    The Masters’ Thread: How Rembrandt Inspires Dale Zinkowski

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread,” artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. Most artists can recall that “one... Read more

  • "Orpheus Playing for Persephone and Eurydice in the Underworld," 2013, by Patricia Watwood. Oil on linen, 72 by 108 inches. (Courtesy of Patricia Watwood)

    Artist Patricia Watwood Imagines Transforming Worlds

    NEW YORK—A woman sitting on a rock by the sea reads a royal blue book. A pink stole draped over her knee swirls up around... Read more

  • Artist Gregory Mortenson at his studio in Manhattan, New York, on Dec. 11, 2016. (Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

    Artist Gregory Mortenson Exalts the Human Spirit

    NEW YORK—A year has passed since Gregory Mortenson reached that quintessential artist’s milestone—a one-man show at a top gallery in New York City. For three... Read more

  • Artist Patricia Watwood in her home studio in Brooklyn, New York City, on Dec. 14, 2016. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)

    The Masters’ Thread: How Sir Thomas Lawrence Inspires Patricia Watwood

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread,” artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work. One of my favorite portrait painters... Read more

  • Agony in the Garden, oil on birch, 2016, by Eric Armusik. (Courtesy Eric Armusik)

    Painter Finds Love, Beauty, Humility in Classical Figurative Art

    As a boy growing up in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Eric Armusik loved to draw. He won his first art contest at the age of 10 and... Read more

  • Press reception for the upcoming Asia Week 2017 at the Erik Thomsen Gallery in New York on Dec. 8, 2016. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)

    Asia Week New York, a Global Hub for Art Lovers in Spring 2017

    NEW YORK—Come spring next year, New York will become the hub for Asian art. Connoisseurs, collectors, scholars, art lovers, and enthusiasts will want to trek... Read more

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    Time to Contemplate Time Among the Ancients

    NEW YORK—Our most memorable experiences, the most blissful to the most tragic, seem to exist outside of time. “Time stood still,” we may say, recalling... Read more

  • "Man has always envied the flight of birds and has attempted to emulate them since ancient times," Temple St. Clair writes in "The Golden Menagerie." (Harald Gottschalk)

    ‘The Golden Menagerie’ Explores Creatures of Myth and Gemstone

    The mythical creatures, animals of folklore, and romanticized, extinct creatures immortalized by jewelry designer Temple St. Clair have been bound together in “The Golden Menagerie,”... Read more

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    ‘The Art of Movement’ Celebrates Timeless Beauty Through Creative Collaboration

    NEW YORK—What does it take to capture the split-second moment in a dancer’s performance that sums up the beauty of the dance and allows the dancer’s... Read more

  • "Capriccio: Excavation of Roman Ruins," circa 1760-62, by Jean Honoré Fragonard (French, Grasse 1732–1806 Paris). Brush and brown and gray wash and watercolor over black chalk on antique laid paper, 10 5/16 by 12 5/16 inches. Private collection (Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art). On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 691.

    The Masters’ Thread: How Fragonard Inspires Anthony Baus

    In this column, “The Masters’ Thread,” artists share their thoughts about how one master’s piece inspires their current work.   This watercolor by Jean Honoré... Read more

  • A woman uses a pattern to create lacquerware at a workshop class at the Japanese restaurant Kosaka in New York on Nov. 13, 2016. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

    Chinkin: Gold-Inlaid Carvings

    NEW YORK—Lacquerware—wooden objects that are hand-painted, carved, and embellished with high attention to detail—has a long history, dating back to objects found in China in... Read more

  • Jean-François-Thérèse Chalgrin (1739 - 1811) Designs 
François-Joseph Belanger (1744 - 1818) Designs 
Pierre Gouthière (1732 - 1813) Bronzes 
Blue Marble Side Table with Neoclassical Mounts, 1781
bleu turquin marble and gilt bronze
37 1/2 in. x 81 1/8 in. (95.25 cm x 206.06 cm)
Henry Clay Frick Bequest.
Accession number: 1915.5.59

    All Abuzz in Wonderment Over Gouthière

    NEW YORK—If objects could speak, those made by Pierre Gouthière (1732–1813) would continue to whisper the incredulous wonder at creation. The 18th-century French master chaser-gilder could... Read more

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    Books to Help Us Understand Homelessness

    Homelessness is a complex issue, affecting more people than we’d like to think. A report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)... Read more

  • The Reception Of Christopher Columbus By Ferdinand II Of Aragon And Isabella by Eugene Deveria.

    Valentine’s Day Poetry for Any Situation

    For Valentine’s Day, I offer you some love poems for almost any situation. The first poem, by the great poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, is perfect... Read more

  • "The Lute Player" by Frans Hals. (public domain)

    Rhymes Remain Fertile Ground for Humorists

    From Mother Goose to Dr. Seuss, rhyming poetry has induced laughter in children for century after century. The enchantment of rhyme, while considered somewhat passé... Read more

  • "Italian Dream" (Aline Coquelle)

    A Publisher That Champions Beauty

    NEW YORK—If Martine Assouline has a motto, it might be that “beauty is necessary—or that culture is the best accessory.” “I strongly believe that when... Read more

  • Cadets of the KGB Moscow Higher Frontier Guards Command Academy parade in Red Square, Moscow, in 1972. (RIA Novosti archive, image #700215/Lev Polikashin/CC-BY-SA 3.0)

    The Nature and Fate of Soviet Communism in ‘One Day We Will Live Without Fear’

    Nearly a century ago, Bolshevik revolutionaries toppled the legal Russian government and murdered the royal family, establishing the world’s first communist regime. For the seven... Read more

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    8 Books With Simple Truths to Remember All Year Long

    At the beginning of a new year, I like to review the past year and think about positive things in my life that I might... Read more

  • "The Great Wave off Kanagawa" circa 1830, by Hokusai. (public domain)

    How to Write a Haiku

    The Japanese-inspired haiku is perhaps the most well-known and often-used form of poetry today. Schoolchildren the English-speaking world over know that a haiku has five... Read more

  • russian_chamber_chorus_picture_2014

    Russian Chamber Chorus to Bridge Celebrated Poets Shakespeare and Pushkin in Concert

    NEW YORK—What do Shakespeare and Pushkin have in common?  Despite the fact that they were writing in places far from each other and centuries apart,... Read more

  • “Triumphant Achilles,” from a panoramic fresco on the upper level of the main hall of the Achilleion in Gastouri, Corfu. Achilles is dragging Hector's lifeless body in front of the Gates of Troy. Andrew Kern considers Homer, who told Achilles's story, to be the source of Western civilization. (Public domain)

    Educator Andrew Kern: The Classics Ignite Our Desire to Learn, to Honor Others

    Not everyone likes school, but everyone loves to learn. “Star Wars” fans light up when they learn something new about the franchise’s movies or actors... Read more

  • William Ruleman. (Elizabeth Sayle Ruleman)

    Withstanding the Ravages of Time: An Interview With Poet William Ruleman

    William Ruleman is helping lead the revival of classical poetry. In addition to serving on the Board of the Society of Classical Poets, he has... Read more

  • “Sunrise on the Bay of Fundy” by William Bradford (1823–1892). (Public Domain)

    Writing a Sonnet: Easy to Difficult (Part 2)

    Part 1 Level 3, Medium-Difficult: Poetry with Rhyme and Structure Traditional or classical poets usually adhere to more rigid structure than is found in the... Read more

  • “Sunrise on the Bay of Fundy” by William Bradford (1823-1892)

    Writing a Sonnet: Easy to Difficult: Part 1

    Put simply, a sonnet is a 14-line poem. I’ll take you through a simple guide that can lead to a basic sonnet in 10 minutes... Read more

  • "Ancient Rome" by Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome). (Gwynne Andrews Fund, 1952)

    Poetry: A Dead Art Form Reborn

    Man, is it nice to meet you, Newspaper Readers. My name is Poetry. I have been crammed into weird shapes in textbooks and have spent... Read more

  • Sibylle Eschapasse in Paris on July 31, 2016. (Marie-Edith Dugoujon)

    Sibylle’s Favorite Quotes About Paris

    Paris… or as they pronounce it in Paris: Paree! The city of lights and romance has inspired so many writers and artists over the years... Read more

  • (Ollyy/Shutterstock)

    Can Reading Fiction Literally Change Your Mind?

    If you are committed to the pleasures of reading, you may be pleased to discover that there is evidence to suggest that reading fiction is... Read more

  • A woman stops by one of the hundred of exhibitors' booths at The Word on the Street Toronto, 2015 (Kent Robinson).

    Canada’s Largest Literary Festival Returns in Celebration of the Written Word

    TORONTO—The Word On The Street, Canada’s largest annual book and magazine festival, returns this year with a newfound confidence in the literary word. Toronto, the... Read more

  • LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 13:  A general view of the books shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize For Fiction during a press conference at the offices of sponsor Man Group on September 13, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

    New Talent to the Fore in Man Booker Prize Shortlist

    Judges for top British literary award the Man Booker Prize spurned big-name novelists in favour of experimental new talent as they announced their shortlist in... Read more

  • Silve Materi, summer library assistant at Alberta Theatre, shows off the special bags that will be used to mail plays to participants in the Purple Play Club. (Courtesy of Alberta Theatre)

    Global Initiative Aims to Highlight the Importance of Libraries

    More than 250 libraries and organizations from around the world, including several in Canada, are participating this week in a grassroots initiative to bring attention... Read more

  • Dawn breaks over Pyongyang, North Korea, as buildings poke through the midst on Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-e)

    In North Korea, a Hardboiled (and Fictional) Cop Keeps Watch

    NEW YORK—The hero, a police inspector, prowls a city known more for its political malevolence than its street crime. If you read the local newspapers,... Read more

  • This March 19, 2016, photo released by Victoria J.H. Ritvo shows her husband, Max Ritvo, in Ojai, Calif. (Jose Villa via AP)

    Max Ritvo, Poet Who Chronicled Cancer Battle, Dies at 25

    LOS ANGELES—Max Ritvo, a poet who chronicled his long battle with cancer in works that were both humorous and searing, has died. He was 25... Read more

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