Arts & Culture

Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: Up Close in Montreal

Michelangelo's "Prophet Jonah," part of a group of paintings showing seven Biblical prophets who all foretold the coming of a messiah. (Copyright Erich Lessing)
Michelangelo's "Prophet Jonah," part of a group of paintings showing seven Biblical prophets who all foretold the coming of a messiah. (Copyright Erich Lessing)

The world premiere of a special photographic exhibition of the almost superhuman works of Renaissance painter, sculptor, and architect Michelangelo is in full swing at...


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