Arts & Culture

Theater Review: ‘The Tailor of Inverness’

Matthew Zajac in the one-man play, "The Tailor of Inverness," uses projected maps to trace possible routes his father took in WWII. (Tim Morozzo)
Matthew Zajac in the one-man play, "The Tailor of Inverness," uses projected maps to trace possible routes his father took in WWII. (Tim Morozzo)

NEW YORK—Written and performed by Matthew Zajac, “The Tailor of Inverness” offers a very personal family mystery wrapped up in a historical conundrum. Even after...


Most recent Arts & Culture blogs and columns

  • Renato Girolami as Doctor Bartolo and Joshua Hopkins as Figaro in the Canadian Opera Company production of “The Barber of Seville.” (Michael Cooper)

    The Barber of Seville: Fun at the Opera

    By Madalina HubertEpoch Times Staff TORONTO—It’s hard to say opera isn’t fun after seeing Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville.” Drawing on the satirical 18th century... Read more

  • Scenes from the Eifman Ballet’s production of “Anna Karenina.” (Hana Kudryashova)

    Anna Karenina Comes to Life Onstage

    By Madalina HubertEpoch Times Staff TORONTO—The story of Anna Karenina, the heroine of Leo Tolstoy’s novel by the same name, is a classic of world... Read more

  • The distance between two people: Tom (Bill Nighy) interrupts Kyra’s (Carey Mulligan) safe, yet difficult life, reminding her of their past love and continuing differences. (John Haynes)

    Theater Review: ‘Skylight’

    NEW YORK—The barriers people surround themselves with in an attempt to hide from the truth or avoid feeling too much can be terribly sad. Case... Read more

  • A view of a section along the Yangtze River, China, c. 1920s. (Collection of Peter Shay)

    Photographer Hunts Down China’s Next Endangered Species: Architecture

    “Out with the old, in with the new” has been the Chinese communist regime’s general attitude toward the country’s architectural heritage. In recent memory, there... Read more

  • Songquan Deng/iStock/Thinktock, Illustration by Epoch Times)

    How to Say ‘Epic Fail’ in Chinese

    “Military tactics on paper” is a four-character idiom from ancient China originally used to describe the fate of a foolhardy Chinese general. Now the saying... Read more

  • Drama is less about what gets said than what gets understood. (Hernán Piñera, CC BY-SA)

    We Can’t Get Those Two Hours Back – Drama Works as Time Unfolds

    This is a long-read essay, the second in a series on playwriting and drama by Julian Meyrick. Part one is here. Asked whether his films... Read more

  • (L–R) Bryce Pinkham, Elisabeth Moss, and Jason Biggs star in “The Heidi Chronicles,” which follows a woman through two important relationships in her life. (Jason Bell)

    Theater Review: ‘Heidi Chronicles’

    NEW YORK—Playwright Wendy Wasserstein covers a lot of bases in her moving and entertaining “The Heidi Chronicles,” now being presented in its first Broadway revival... Read more

  • Tessa Ferrer and Grantham Coleman appear as a couple living in a black neighborhood undergoing gentrification, in “Buzzer.” (Joan Marcus)

    Theater Review: ‘Buzzer’

    NEW YORK—It’s not always a good idea to go home again, as Tracey Scott Wilson demonstrates in her tautly written drama “Buzzer,” now at the... Read more

  • IMG_5453

    The Opulence of Embroidery

    NEW YORK—Perhaps it’s the anticipation of spring blossoms that makes one veer toward that which is ornate and colorful in the man-made. Artists have long... Read more

  • Tibetan Sand Mandala Creation. (San Jose Library, CC BY-SA 2.0)

    A Tibetan Monk Walks Into a Bar … the Future of Creativity

    Beyond questions of its value and its sources there is a question less frequently contested about creativity: its relationship to us. One evening some time... Read more

  • Voyageurs, a scene from “Odysseo.” (Lynne Glazer)

    Cavalia’s ‘Odysseo': Ancient Values Brought to Life

    TORONTO—Ancient cultures valued the idea of harmony between heaven and earth—the principle that man, earth, and all creatures are interconnected with each other and with... Read more

  • The introduction of conscription in 1917 exposed and fuelled profound divisions among Canadians from coast to coast. (Courtesy Canadian War Museum)

    New Exhibit Examines Canada’s 1917 Conscription Crisis

    The Canadian War Museum’s new permanent exhibition gallery, “The Home Front, 1917,” presents a concise depiction of how the war affected those back home by... Read more

  • Design firm partners, Tom Geismar (L) and Ivan Chermayeff (R) pose for a photo in one of their early offices in the late 1960’s in front of a logo of the American Graphic Arts exhibit that was shown in the USSR at the height of the Cold War, designed by Geisner, and Visitez les USA posters designed by Chermayeff to advertise the US Pavilion at the Montreal World's Fair in 1967 as part of their work with Cambridge 7 Associates. (Photo courtesy of Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)

    This Is New York: Graphic Arts Pioneer Ivan Chermayeff on Work as Play

    NEW YORK—When work is play and play is work, there’s no reason to stop working. “There’s no possibility of even thinking of a better job,”... Read more

  • Reporters and camera crews get a preview of items from the Lauren Bacall Collection at Bonham's in New York on March 24, 2015. (DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

    Bonhams Vice President Remembers His Friendship With Lauren Bacall

    Of the recent Lauren Bacall Collection auction held March 31 at Bonhams New York, every one of the 740 lots sold, bringing in a total of... Read more

  • Author Linden MacIntyre poses with his novel “The Bishop’s Men” at the Giller Prize gala in 2009. MacIntyre, former host of the CBC’s “The Fifth Estate,” is one of three authors participating in the Crime and Punishment discussion during the Ottawa International Writers Festival. (The Canadian Press/Darren Calabrese)

    Ottawa International Writers Festival Has an Author for Everyone

    For those who love the written word, the Ottawa International Writers Festival – Spring Edition brings together established and emerging authors from Canada and around... Read more

  • David Wiffen during a rare personal appearance at Compact Music in Ottawa on March 21, 2015. Wiffen recently released “Songs from the Lost & Found,” an album of rediscovered music dating from 1973 to the early eighties. (Gavin Murphy)

    David Wiffen Releases ‘Songs From the Lost & Found’

    David Wiffen, one of Canada’s most iconic singer-songwriters, has released an album of rediscovered music dating from 1973 to the early eighties. The longtime Ottawa... Read more

  • Tibetan Sand Mandala Creation. (San Jose Library, CC BY-SA 2.0)

    A Tibetan Monk Walks Into a Bar … the Future of Creativity

    Beyond questions of its value and its sources there is a question less frequently contested about creativity: its relationship to us. One evening some time... Read more

  • Design firm partners, Tom Geismar (L) and Ivan Chermayeff (R) pose for a photo in one of their early offices in the late 1960’s in front of a logo of the American Graphic Arts exhibit that was shown in the USSR at the height of the Cold War, designed by Geisner, and Visitez les USA posters designed by Chermayeff to advertise the US Pavilion at the Montreal World's Fair in 1967 as part of their work with Cambridge 7 Associates. (Photo courtesy of Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)

    This Is New York: Graphic Arts Pioneer Ivan Chermayeff on Work as Play

    NEW YORK—When work is play and play is work, there’s no reason to stop working. “There’s no possibility of even thinking of a better job,”... Read more

  • A metalpoint drawing by Leonardo da Vinci believed to have been referenced in the creation of “Madonna Litta.” 7 inches by 6.6 inches. (Public Domain)

    Inside Leonardo Da Vinci’s Collaborative Workshop

    NEW YORK—Leonardo Da Vinci: Renaissance man, philosopher, inventor, delegator? In a March 6, 2013 lecture titled “Leonardo da Vinci: Singular and Plural,” Luke Syson, curator... Read more

  • Woman eating donut (Suprijono Suharjoto/iStock/Thinkstock)

    8 Ways Trans Fats Can Hurt Your Body

    Partially hydrogenated oil is an example of something that is potentially good being turned into something that is definitely bad. The hydrogenation process eventually converts... Read more

  • Showing how it’s done. (Public domain)

    ‘Shakespeare of Music’ Finally Gets His Own Blue Plaque

    London is about to get its latest blue plaque. A building on Great Pulteney Street in Soho will soon be marked as the site of... Read more

  • “The Flagellants,” Completed in Munich between 1885 and 1889 by Carl von Marr (1858 – 1936). Oil on canvas, 14 inches by 23 inches.

    Uncertainty and the Plague: Carl Von Marr’s Painting ‘The Flagellants’

    Terror gripped the kingdoms of Europe that had been overwhelmed by the misery and chaos following the bubonic and pneumonic plagues. Known as The Great Mortality, nearly a third... Read more

  • In this Thursday, March 11, 2010, file photo, empty frames from which thieves took "Storm on the Sea of Galilee," left background, by Rembrandt and "The Concert," right foreground, by Vermeer, remain on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The museum says it's doing the best it can with tours and lectures to help visitors appreciate the 13 paintings that were stolen. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds, File)

    After 25 Years, Gardner Museum Art Theft Remains a Mystery

    BOSTON—It’s been called the biggest art heist in U.S. history, perhaps the biggest in the world. But 25 years later, the theft of 13 works... Read more

  • (Dean_Fikar/iStock/Thinkstock)

    How Photography Evolved From Science to Art

    Much like a painting, a photograph has the ability to move, engage, and inspire viewers. It could be a black-and-white Ansel Adams landscape of a... Read more

  • Woodturner Jason Van Duyn arranges funerary urns in his Raleigh, N.C., studio on March 4, 2015. Van Duyn makes urns that he hopes his clients will be proud to display in their homes. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    With Cremations Up, Urn Artists Look for the Beauty in Death

    APEX, N.C.—Of all the pieces Julie Moore crafts in her home studio, the most popular is a brightly colored fabric vessel she calls “the party... Read more

  • (Samira Bouaou/Epoch TImes)

    New York City Awash in Asian Art and Antiques

    NEW YORK—The annual Asia Week kicks off the month of March, one filled with Asian art and antiques on display in galleries across the Upper... Read more

  • David Geffen, philanthropist and entertainment mogul. (Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images for UCLA)

    David Geffen Donates $100 Million to Lincoln Center

    NEW YORK—Entertainment industry executive David Geffen has donated $100 million to New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The performing arts building — long... Read more

  • Husband and Wife, Sunday Morning, Detroit, Michigan, 1950. Photograph by Gordon Parks. Courtesy and © The Gordon Parks Foundation. Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    Gordon Parks Exhibit Offers Intimate Glimpse Into Segregation-Era Life for African Americans

    In the spring of 1950, Gordon Parks, the first African-American photographer for Life Magazine, returned to his hometown of Fort Scott, Kansas. On assignment for... Read more

  • This photo, taken with an iPhone on Feb. 25, 2015, shows an installation created by contemporary artist Nuno Vasa of Lisbon, Portugal, a full-size cable car made entirely of cork _ a major Portuguese export, at the Kennedy Center in Washington. The installation is featured in a three-week, $6 million Iberian arts festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, featuring theater, music, dance and visual arts from Portugal, Spain and the many countries they have influenced over the centuries. (AP Photo/Brett Zongker)

    Picasso’s Rarely Seen Ceramics Featured At Kennedy Center

    WASHINGTON—While Pablo Picasso crafted thousands of ceramic pieces late in his career that reflected his Mediterranean and Spanish roots, this art was long overshadowed by... Read more

  • If you’re not born with creativity, do you have to struggle to acquire it? (Robin Taylor/Flickr)

    Teaching Creativity: Born That Way or Waiting for the Muse?

    Recently one of my masters students, a filmmaker from the Czech Republic, told me his friends back at home were completely baffled that he was... Read more

  • "On The Seashore," 1879, by George Elgar Hicks. Oil on canvas. Private collection. (Image courtesy of Art Renewal Center)

    Rediscovering Victorian Painter George Elgar Hicks

    George Elgar Hicks (1824–1914) is one of those artists, well appreciated among 19th century Victorian scholars, but virtually unknown to the general public of today... Read more

  • A bronze mirror with a woman's head in relief from the Hellenistic period. It is part of a major collection of ancient Greco-Roman and Near-Eastern objects that New York philanthropists Robert and Renee Belfer are giving a to the Jerusalem museum, Feb. 12, 2015 (AP/Israel Museum, Elie Posner)

    NY Antiquities Collection Donated to Israel Museum

    NEW YORK—Two New York philanthropists are donating a major collection of more than 300 ancient Greco-Roman and Near-Eastern glass vessels to The Israel Museum in... Read more

  • “Au Clair de la Lune,” 2013, by Camie Salaz, 38 inches x 46 inches, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of Camie Salaz)

    Painter Spotlight: Camie Salaz, Transformation Through Art

    Tarrytown, the home of painter Camie Salaz, lies about 20 miles north of New York on the Hudson River, where the great landscape painters Frederic... Read more

  • In this Feb. 9, 2015 photo, museum visitors examine sculptures by Iranian artist Parviz Tanavoli at the Davis Museum on the campus of Wellesley College in Wellesley, Mass. Tanavoli, a modern sculptor celebrated for fusing Persian traditions with pop sensibilities, opened the first U.S. retrospective of his work at the museum in Wellesely. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

    Famous Iranian Artist Makes US Debut With Show About ‘Nothing’

    WELLESLEY, Mass.—Iranian artist Parviz Tanavoli has built a successful career around the concept of nothing. Tanavoli creates sculptures of the word “heech,” which means “nothing”... Read more

  • This photo provided by the police of Swiss Canton Tessin shows the painting "Ritratto di Isabella d'Este" by Leonardo da Vinci, which was seized by the police of Ticino Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015 (AP/Kantonspolizei Tessin)

    Swiss Seize Alleged Leonardo Portrait for Italian Probe

    MILAN—Italian authorities have ordered the seizure from a Swiss bank vault of a portrait attributed to Leonardo da Vinci that they say was illegally removed... Read more

  • Sotheby's staff pose for a picture with 'Le Grand Canal' by Claude Monet, during a preview of their upcoming Impressionist and Modern, Surrealist and Contemporary Art sale, at the auction house in London, England, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. The collection of paintings and sculptures, with an estimated total value of 233 million pounds ($354 million), is due to go under the hammer on Feb. 3 and Feb. 10. (AP/Tim Ireland)

    Monet Means Money: Auction Nets Record $280 Million Total

    LONDON (AP) — A Venetian waterscape by Claude Monet has sold for more than $35 million at a London auction as the high-end art market... Read more

  • Renato Girolami as Doctor Bartolo and Joshua Hopkins as Figaro in the Canadian Opera Company production of “The Barber of Seville.” (Michael Cooper)

    The Barber of Seville: Fun at the Opera

    By Madalina HubertEpoch Times Staff TORONTO—It’s hard to say opera isn’t fun after seeing Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville.” Drawing on the satirical 18th century... Read more

  • Scenes from the Eifman Ballet’s production of “Anna Karenina.” (Hana Kudryashova)

    Anna Karenina Comes to Life Onstage

    By Madalina HubertEpoch Times Staff TORONTO—The story of Anna Karenina, the heroine of Leo Tolstoy’s novel by the same name, is a classic of world... Read more

  • The distance between two people: Tom (Bill Nighy) interrupts Kyra’s (Carey Mulligan) safe, yet difficult life, reminding her of their past love and continuing differences. (John Haynes)

    Theater Review: ‘Skylight’

    NEW YORK—The barriers people surround themselves with in an attempt to hide from the truth or avoid feeling too much can be terribly sad. Case... Read more

  • Drama is less about what gets said than what gets understood. (Hernán Piñera, CC BY-SA)

    We Can’t Get Those Two Hours Back – Drama Works as Time Unfolds

    This is a long-read essay, the second in a series on playwriting and drama by Julian Meyrick. Part one is here. Asked whether his films... Read more

  • (L–R) Bryce Pinkham, Elisabeth Moss, and Jason Biggs star in “The Heidi Chronicles,” which follows a woman through two important relationships in her life. (Jason Bell)

    Theater Review: ‘Heidi Chronicles’

    NEW YORK—Playwright Wendy Wasserstein covers a lot of bases in her moving and entertaining “The Heidi Chronicles,” now being presented in its first Broadway revival... Read more

  • Tessa Ferrer and Grantham Coleman appear as a couple living in a black neighborhood undergoing gentrification, in “Buzzer.” (Joan Marcus)

    Theater Review: ‘Buzzer’

    NEW YORK—It’s not always a good idea to go home again, as Tracey Scott Wilson demonstrates in her tautly written drama “Buzzer,” now at the... Read more

  • Voyageurs, a scene from “Odysseo.” (Lynne Glazer)

    Cavalia’s ‘Odysseo': Ancient Values Brought to Life

    TORONTO—Ancient cultures valued the idea of harmony between heaven and earth—the principle that man, earth, and all creatures are interconnected with each other and with... Read more

  • David Wiffen during a rare personal appearance at Compact Music in Ottawa on March 21, 2015. Wiffen recently released “Songs from the Lost & Found,” an album of rediscovered music dating from 1973 to the early eighties. (Gavin Murphy)

    David Wiffen Releases ‘Songs From the Lost & Found’

    David Wiffen, one of Canada’s most iconic singer-songwriters, has released an album of rediscovered music dating from 1973 to the early eighties. The longtime Ottawa... Read more

  • The Radio City Rockettes are fabulous as always. (MSG Productions)

    Theater Review: ‘New York Spring Spectacular’

    NEW YORK—Few theaters have the capability to do what the “New York Spring Spectacular” at Radio City Music Hall does in their show. The theater... Read more

  • Wanna-be actor Clark Twelvetrees (Keith Nobbs) and his wife Helen Twelvetrees (Brooke Bloom) have a tumultuous relationship, as envisioned by writer/actor David Greenspan in his new play. (Hunter Canning)

    Theater Review: ‘I’m Looking for Helen Twelvetrees’

    NEW YORK—Actor/writer David Greenspan shines a light on a forgotten figure in his new show, “I’m Looking For Helen Twelvetress,” about a New York actress... Read more

  • Elizabeth (Jenni Barber) is a wife sold to rich miner Ben (Keith Carradine) in “Paint Your Wagon,” presented by Encores! at New York City Center. (Joan Marcus)

    Theater Review: ‘Paint Your Wagon’

    NEW YORK—”There’s gold in them thar hills,” as the recent Encores! production of the 1951 tuner “Paint Your Wagon” (book and lyrics by Alan Jay... Read more

  • A scene from the equestrian show Cavalier currently visiting Hong Kong and performing daily between April 2 and May 10, 2015. (Bill Cox/Epoch Times)

    ‘Cavalia': Equestrian show spectacular

    HONG KONG—The spectacular Canadian equestrian show Cavalia opens its doors to the public in Hong Kong on Tuesday March 31. It has had such enormous... Read more

  • Dan Sharkey as Hucklebee (L) and Kevin R. Free as Bellomy in "The Fantasticks." The off-Broadway phenomenon “The Fantasticks” will end its fantastic run May 3.  (AP Photo/DDPR Public Relations, Graham Dougherty, File)

    Record-Breaking Show ‘The Fantasticks’ to Close in May

    NEW YORK—The off-Broadway phenomenon “The Fantasticks” will pack away its confetti and cardboard moon this summer, ending a record-breaking, fantastic run that started when Dwight... Read more

  • Ilya Kaler (Courtesy of Diane Saldick)

    Ilya Kaler: One of the World’s Finest Violinists Today

    “Do the thing, and you shall have the power,” Ralph Waldo Emerson said. Master violinist Ilya Kaler is the embodiment of this idea: He has... Read more

  • Toronto-raised Chilly Gonzales has been on a mission to make classical music more accessible, and it continues with the release this week of “Chambers,” which uses piano and strings to sketch links between Romantic-era chamber music and modern pop. (The Canadian Press/HO-Alexandre Isard)

    Chilly Gonzales: Igniting Renewed Appreciation for Classical Music

    TORONTO—It was a childhood visit to an art gallery, chaperoned by his father, that first ignited Chilly Gonzales’s passion for rendering esoteric pieces more accessible... Read more

  • Music unifies the world into a whole. (Feliciano Guimarães/Flickr, CC BY-SA 4.0)

    How Music Helps Resolve Our Deepest Inner Conflicts

    Billions of people enjoy music; many feel that they can’t live without it. Why? It’s a question that has puzzled scientists and philosophers for centuries:... Read more

  • Wayne Kirkpatrick, Karey Kirkpatrick, and John O'Farrell outside the St. James Theatre in New York, March 3. The three men have written the music and story for the new Broadway musical "Something Rotten!" a comedy set in Shakespeare’'s England. (AP Photo/Mark Kennedy)

    How Three Broadway Novices Wrote ‘Something Rotten!’

    NEW YORK—It began with an intriguing premise for a musical: What would it have been like to be a fledgling playwright making a living at... Read more

  • (L) Louise (Carrie Coon) is a doctoral student working on new arousal drug. Neither she nor study participant, Mary (Florencia Lozano), know whether the trial sample that she is receiving is a placedo or the experimental drug, in the new play “Placebo.” (Joan Marcus)

    Theater Review: ‘Placebo’

    NEW YORK—The term “Placebo” has multiple definitions. “To please someone” is the definition offered in Melissa James Gibson’s play of the same name. However, the... Read more

  • The Little Prince (Tarah Flanagan) tames The Fox (Paola Styron) , in Hangs a Tale's production of "The Little Prince." (Courtesy of Hangs a Tale)

    Theater Review: ‘The Little Prince’

    NEW YORK—Adapted for the stage by Rick Cummins and John Scoullar, the beautiful book “Le Petit Prince” (“The Little Prince”) by Antoine de Saint-Exupery comes... Read more

  • George C. Wolfe arrives at the Lucky Guy Opening Night in New York, April 1, 2013. Wolfe will direct "Shuffle Along, Or, The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed," starring Audra McDonald and choreographed by Savion Glover. The production will start performances next March. (Photo by Dario Cantatore/Invision/AP, File)

    ‘Shuffle Along': 94-Year-Old Show Returns to Broadway

    NEW YORK—In 1921, a show limped onto Broadway with less-than-rosy prospects. The city was still recovering from The Depression. The show was debuting in the... Read more

  • Author Linden MacIntyre poses with his novel “The Bishop’s Men” at the Giller Prize gala in 2009. MacIntyre, former host of the CBC’s “The Fifth Estate,” is one of three authors participating in the Crime and Punishment discussion during the Ottawa International Writers Festival. (The Canadian Press/Darren Calabrese)

    Ottawa International Writers Festival Has an Author for Everyone

    For those who love the written word, the Ottawa International Writers Festival – Spring Edition brings together established and emerging authors from Canada and around... Read more

  • (Krystyna Wojciechowska - czarnik/Thinkstock)

    Why You Should Be Reading Poetry

    Meeting someone new and engaging him in friendly conversation, I explain, “I help run a poetry website.” What follows is a general phenomenon I’ve observed... Read more

  • 4 African Authors Among Man Booker Finalists

    JOHANNESBURG—The “Memoirs of a Porcupine,” the “Confessions of the Lioness” and the lessons from the Sahara desert are just some of the titles and themes... Read more

  • Library of Birmingham Oratory. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

    We Need to Remember That Libraries Are About Books, Not Business

    The Library of Birmingham was one of the UK’s top ten tourist attractions in 2014 – and the only one outside London. This would seem... Read more

  • 'Divergent' author Veronica Roth. (Courtesy of HarperCollins)

    Books in the News: Maya Angelou, Paula Deen, James Patterson

    ‘Divergent’ Author Penning New Series Author Veronica Roth has struck a deal with HarperCollins Publishers to create a two-book series “in the vein of Star... Read more

  • Author and documentary film-maker Tariq Nasheed pictured in Amsterdam (Courtesy Tariq Nasheed)

    The Rules of Racism

    Are you racist? Most of us don’t feel like we are. But what if there was a system of racism that we’re not aware of,... Read more

  • The First Folio of Shakespeare plays recently discovered in Saint-Omer in France, is displayed after a press conference at Shakespeare's Globe theatre in London, Monday, Feb. 23, 2015. (AP/Matt Dunham)

    First Folio Found in France to Visit Shakespeare’ Globe

    LONDON—A rare first edition of William Shakespeare’s plays is to go on display in the bard’s spiritual home, just a few hundred yards from where... Read more

  • Oprah Winfrey arrives at Selma And The Legends That Paved The Way Gala in Goleta, Calif. (Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

    Oprah Winfrey Selects Cynthia Bond’s ‘Ruby’ for Book Club

    NEW YORK—From the very first sentence, Oprah Winfrey loved what became her latest book club pick. “I thought, ‘Wow, this is so good I have... Read more

  • Literary translation has occurred for centuries (the Bible is a prime example). And with Nobel Prize winners like French author Patrick Modiano, it’s unlikely to disappear anytime soon. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Absorbed in Translation: The Art – and Fun – of Literary Translation

    I recently stumbled upon a post that describes the process of literary translation as “soul-crushing.” That’s news to me, and I’ve been engaged in literary... Read more

  • An actor holds up a self-detonating version of “Private Vegas” by James Patterson in this screenshot from James Patterson's YouTube channel. (Epoch Times)

    Books in the News: James Patterson’s Self-Destructing Novel Offered for $294,038

    James Patterson’s Self-Destructing Novel Offered for $294,038 Pushing the limits of traditional book marketing strategies, author James Patterson is offering what he’s calling, “the most... Read more

  • Teeming with secrets… (Shutterstock*)

    Scientists Use Physics to Read Scrolls From Herculaneum – but Why Do We Care?

    The recent announcement that European scientists had pioneered a technique for reading papyrus scrolls from Herculaneum without unrolling them attracted widespread attention. At first glance,... Read more

  • (Alan Levine, CC BY)

    Poetry Is Well and Truly in the Margins – Will It Ever Get Out?

    I was on a train recently reading a book of poems by Carol Rumens when the elderly man sitting across the table said, “Do people... Read more

  • Books from the Penguin publishing company are displayed in a book store in Central London on Oct. 29, 2012. (Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

    Books in the News: IBook Sees 1 Million New Users Each Week and More

    Keith Moerer, director of iBooks at Apple, revealed that the application has enjoyed an average of “1 million new customers every week since mid-September,” according... Read more

  • Mark Zuckerberg. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/GettyImages)

    Books in the News: Mark Zuckerberg Launches Book Club

    On Jan. 2, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the creation of his new book club, A Year of Books, in which Zuckerberg will pursue a... Read more

  • Du Bin tells about the crimes committed at Masanjia Labor Camp in his new book, “The Roar of Masanjia.” (Poon Zaishu/Epoch Times)

    The Story Behind a Letter From Hell

    Just before Christmas in 2012 a letter that had been smuggled into a Halloween Kit sold by K-Mart made international news. The letter, in broken... Read more

  • Left: Miklos Radnoti in 1930. (Public domain/Wikimedia Commons) Right: Cover of the book "All That Still Matters at All," by Miklos Radnoti. (New American Press)

    Poetry of the Holocaust Gets New Translation

    In 1944, on a forced march from Serbia to central Hungary, poet Miklos Radnoti was shot to death and his body dumped in a mass... Read more

  • Vera Lam, author of “The Lonely American.” (Jenny Liu/Epoch Times)

    Vera Lam and Her Debut Novel ‘The Lonely American’

    It has been 40 years, and the Vietnam War is farther and farther away from us. However, a Taiwanese writer who grew up in Vietnam... Read more

  • Artist Maurice Sendak signs his individual prints from the “The Mother Goose Collection,” July 26, 1990, in New York. Sendak’s death in 2012 sparked debate in the industry over the monetary value of children’s literature. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan)

    A Tale of Squirreling Away Books

    Maurice Sendak, author of “Where the Wild Things Are,” was an ardent defender of children’s literature, believing the works of Beatrix Potter to be equal... Read more

  • Elio D’Anna, founder of the European School of Economics, speaks during the Vision And Reality Awards in New York City. (Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for European School of Economics Foundation)

    Revolution of the Mind

    LONDON—A twist of fate left Elio D’Anna in solitude for three years, separated from friends, family and in a foreign country. During that time the... Read more

  • The recent discovery of a First Folio in St. Omer, France brings the total number of known copies to 233. (Victoria and Albert Museum, London, National Art Library)

    The Strange Fates of the Shakespeare First Folio

    The Shakespeare First Folio (1623), the first collected edition of his plays and the sole source for half of them (including Macbeth, Antony & Cleopatra,... Read more


    Top