Richard Cox
Richard Cox

Richard Cox

Business

Richard Cox is a university teacher in international trade and finance. .. view profile

Janet Walters Levite
Janet Walters Levite

Janet Walters Levite

Entertainment

is an Optioned Screenwriter and Film Crtiic / Entertainment Writer for The Guardian Liberty Voice. She resides in New York City... view profile

James Grundvig
James Grundvig

James Grundvig

Tech

CEO of Cloudnician LLC, a mobile-cloud startup with big data pull. He has 25+ years of engineering-construction experience on projects of scale. .. view profile

Beth Shaw
Beth Shaw

Beth Shaw

Health

Beth Shaw is the President of YogaFit, the world’s largest yoga training school. Her third book, YogaLean, will be released this fall, and offers a holistic app.. view profile

Chris Grasso
Chris Grasso

Chris Grasso

Life

Chris is a freelance writer who lives in Florida and loves the sunshine... view profile

Veronica Davis
Veronica Davis

Veronica Davis

Life

Veronica is a wife, freelance writer and work at home mom. Her and her husband live in Missouri with their three boys. .. view profile

June Rousso
June Rousso

June Rousso

Health

June Rousso, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and holistic health counselor in N.Y.C. with a focus on dietary and lifestyle changes to support health. .. view profile

Barry Bassis
Barry Bassis

Barry Bassis

Arts & Culture

Barry has been a music, theater and travel writer for over a decade for various publications. .. view profile

Deborah Asseraf
Deborah Asseraf

Deborah Asseraf

Business

Deborah Asseraf is founder & CEO of Popcorn Productions, a company that explodes awareness for businesses through highly tailored campaigns. .. view profile

John Christopher Fine
John Christopher Fine

John Christopher Fine

Life

is a marine biologist with two doctoral degrees, has authored 24 books, including award-winning books dealing with ocean pollution... view profile

Liz Leafloor
Liz Leafloor

Liz Leafloor

Science

Liz Leafloor is a Freelance Writer, Copy Editor, and Graphic Artist. She explores mysterious subjects and hidden histories... view profile

Sheila Kemper Dietrich
Sheila Kemper Dietrich

Sheila Kemper Dietrich

Life

Sheila is the Founder and CEO of Livliga. She created Livliga and the VisualQs philosophy out of a desire to embrace and share a healthier lifestyle. .. view profile

Linda Moore
Linda Moore

Linda Moore

Business

I am a freelance writer and enjoy reporting on a variety of topics... view profile

Anthony Carter
Anthony Carter

Anthony Carter

Sports

Sports News based on NY Liberty & NY Giants currently. NBA Draft on June 26th.. view profile

Stephen Stapczynski
Stephen Stapczynski

Stephen Stapczynski

World

Stephen reports on Asia & Pacific news and politics. His primary interests include Japanese domestic politics, US-Japan relations, and geopolitics in East Asia... view profile

Bianca Silva
Bianca Silva

Bianca Silva

Entertainment

Recent grad, music journalist, music lover. .. view profile






  • The Strange Things We Shoot into Space

    Bonsai in Space

    It’s official – humanity loves shooting things into space. Over the course of human space exploration we’ve shipped many strange things into our upper atmosphere and beyond in the name of curiosity, discovery, and science.

    This was demonstrated most recently through the art exhibit, Exobiotanica. Japanese artist Azuma Makoto launched a large helium balloon into …

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  • Falling Stars and Black Stone: Humanity’s Worship of Meteorites

    Imilac Pallasite

    NASA’s Curiosity rover recently discovered a massive metal meteorite on the surface of Mars. The first encounter of its type, the two meters (6.5 feet) wide iron meteorite has been named ‘Lebanon’, and scientists are eager to examine the find. It is the largest ever discovered on the planet.

    Back on Earth, meteorites have …

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  • Ring of Skulls: Ancient and Modern Sacrifices to the Water Gods

    Neptune Carving

    The macabre discovery of a ring of children’s skulls buried in the earth around lakes in Germany and Switzerland has revealed an age-old tradition of making offerings and sacrifices to the water gods.

     

    Archaeologists from Basel University, Switzerland found the skulls of children forming a protective ring around the settlements in what they believe …

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  • Snakes With Beards and Other Strange Serpent Tales

    Bronze bearded serpent

    The snake is one of the oldest and most pervasive mythological symbols in the world. There are as many creation myths about snakes as there are religions and cultures, and as many interpretations to the meaning of the serpent as there are stars in the sky.

    Certainly a powerful symbol, the snake is often seen …

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  • Ancient Ink: Mummies and Their Amazing Tattoos

    Mummy of the Ukok Princess/Siberian Ice Maiden. Tattoos line her arms. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Tattoos have played a role in the lives of prehistoric and modern man alike. Societal status, art, religion, and medicine all create a tradition in tattoo design that spans across centuries and around the globe. Depending on the times and culture, body art was considered to be lowly and barbaric, or a signifier of very …

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  • Antarctic Ice Collapsing; Sea To Rise

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, pictured here is collapsing. Early predictions are for a 3 metre rise in sea-level.

    Just over a month ago I was sitting somewhat bewildered at my desk and rereading two research papers about the antarctic ice collapsing. I had known about sea level rise for many years now but this was big news; the enormous West Antarctic ice shelf was melting and breaking up on a slow slide into …

    Read More

  • Shark Attacks; The Australian Story

    Andrea Lynch was one of the lucky survivors of a Florida shark attack. She required 100 stitches to repair the damage done by a Bull Shark.

    I’ve spent the last 40 years in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef and shark attacks were always a big concern. During the ‘early days’ I saw so many sharks that I included them in my census work just because they were all around me. In many places, sharks of all species averaged about …

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  • World Ocean Day and eight kids

    With bamboo from the rainforest and grim determination, eight children set out to show the rest of the world what Ocean Day was all about.

    Another year had passed and concerned people were celebrating World Ocean Day on June 8th. We all depend on a healthy and clean ocean for our very survival and the latest scientific research is painting a dismal picture of things to come. Most of us know we need to act to turn around the damage …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

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  • Shrimp Farming; Recipe for Disaster

    Shrimp trawling is one of the most destructive fisheries in the world.

    In my last post I was talking about one of the world’s most destructive fishing methods; bottom trawling for shrimp. This is the way most wild shrimp are caught and it has created an environmental disaster in terms of destruction of the seabed and what lives there. Bottom trawling has to end if we are …

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  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

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  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

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  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

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  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

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  • Thomson Reuters Coral Reef Rescue

    Where reefs are healthy, species diversity and fisheries production is high.

    It’s just on a month ago that staff at The Andaman Resort were preparing for the arrival of their biggest ever CSR group to join our coral reef rescue. Community and Social Responsibility (CSR) has become the latest team activity of concerned businesses around the world who realize that they do owe something to the …

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  • Sharks, whales, ivory, and drugs

    Tens of thousands of sharks are now being killed every hour of the day. Photo by Shawn Heinrichs.

    The Guardian reported (4TH April, 2014) that Japan’s biggest online retailer, Rakuten, will stop their whale meat and dolphin meat sales by the end of April after the International Court of Justice ordered Japan to immediately halt its annual whale hunts in the southern ocean.

    Rakuten said it had asked sellers to cancel sales of …

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  • Deep Sea Mining; Digging a Hole We Can’t Get Out Of

    This weird deep sea angler fish lives at abyssal depths that exert pressures of 11,000 pounds per square inch.

    In May, 2013 the United Nations published its first plan for deep sea mining saying companies could apply for mining licenses as soon as 2016. To date the UN’s International Seabed Authority has issued 17 exploration permits with 7 more pending.

    “We are at the threshold of a new era of deep sea mining” said …

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  • Saving the World One Artificial Reef at a Time

    Mini-artificial reef modules become home for juvenile fish, crabs, and small invertebrates within days of being put in the sea.

    Ten years ago on December 26 the third largest earthquake in recorded history created a lethal tsunami that tore through Asia leaving behind an estimated 280,000 dead. It also reached far into the future by destroying coral reefs that are the ‘bread-basket’ of nearly 200 million people in this part of the world. Now artificial …

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  • Leatherback Turtle Slips Toward Extinction

    A huge Leatherback drags itself ashore to lay eggs in a nest of sand it hopes will protect the young from predators.

    I saw my first Leatherback turtle in the Florida Keys long before that string of gorgeous islands became the foundation of endless high-rise buildings. It reminded me of a flattened car; it was huge!

    Leatherback turtles can grow to over 3 m long and weigh nearly 1,000 kg. Its front flippers can reach an amazing …

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  • Climate Change, Me and Polar Bears; A Final Entry

    Am I watching the curtain call for the bears or an apocalypse in the making?

    In my last report about climate change I was looking at the plight of polar bears as their frozen habitat shrinks into oblivion. It’s all very sad but it is after all half a world away. I’m still OK, right?

    Actually it’s bad news for all of us. I live only a few hundred kilometres …

    Read More

  • Antarctic Ice Collapsing; Sea To Rise

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, pictured here is collapsing. Early predictions are for a 3 metre rise in sea-level.

    Just over a month ago I was sitting somewhat bewildered at my desk and rereading two research papers about the antarctic ice collapsing. I had known about sea level rise for many years now but this was big news; the enormous West Antarctic ice shelf was melting and breaking up on a slow slide into …

    Read More

  • World Ocean Day and eight kids

    With bamboo from the rainforest and grim determination, eight children set out to show the rest of the world what Ocean Day was all about.

    Another year had passed and concerned people were celebrating World Ocean Day on June 8th. We all depend on a healthy and clean ocean for our very survival and the latest scientific research is painting a dismal picture of things to come. Most of us know we need to act to turn around the damage …

    Read More

  • Climate Change, Me and Polar Bears; A Final Entry

    Am I watching the curtain call for the bears or an apocalypse in the making?

    In my last report about climate change I was looking at the plight of polar bears as their frozen habitat shrinks into oblivion. It’s all very sad but it is after all half a world away. I’m still OK, right?

    Actually it’s bad news for all of us. I live only a few hundred kilometres …

    Read More

  • Tipping Points and Shark Fin Soup

    This photo shows the most dangerous species on the planet. The other animal is the harmless whale shark, largest fish in the sea.

    I’ve spent most of my life working close to sharks. They were always a concern and I certainly have had a few moments when I doubted the sense in what I was doing. But now I’m concerned about what’s happening to sharks on a global scale. I’m concerned about tipping points and the shark fin …

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  • Oceanic Whitetip Sharks Are Pushed Toward Extinction by Shark Finning

    I was being towed behind a small boat 150 km from shore and counting reef fish as part of my underwater surveys on the Great Barrier Reef. On one side of me the water was about 10 metres deep, bright and colorful with coral and fish and then it plunged down to nearly 1000 metres …

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  • Ghost Fishing and the Staggering Cost of Rubbish

    Not many people know what ‘ghost fishing’ is. It sounds scary and in fact is; but not for the reasons you might think.

    Ghost fishing is when lost or discarded fishing equipment just keeps on catching fish. The caught fish die and attract more marine life to their death. This endless circle of destruction can …

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  • The Sea Butterfly Effect

    Mathematicians have developed the concept of chaos theory. In a nutshell, this says that some processes are incredibly sensitive to the conditions at the time they start; things can turn out very differently with each tiny variation at the beginning.

    This lead to the term, the Butterfly Effect, coined by Edward Lorenz (1917-2008) and created …

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  • Great Barrier Reef Dives to ‘Endangered’ Listing?

    It’s hard to believe! It was 43 years ago that I put my head underwater and first saw the Great Barrier Reef. I was a lot younger and very naive. Lots of years working for the Government changed both of those facts.

    My proudest day was when I reported for work as the Queensland Government’s …

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  • We’re Building a Coral Reef for Our Children

    On December 26, 2004 a tsunami generated by the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the third largest earthquake in recorded history, roared into Datai Bay on the Northwest corner of Langkawi, Malaysia. This bay and its nearby surroundings support the best coral reef development in the sleepy waters of this quiet island. When the tsunami struck, it swept …

    Read More


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