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Jerry Nelson
Jerry Nelson

Jerry Nelson

World

Jerry Nelson is a freelance photojournalist. American by birth and now based in South America, Jerry covers social justice issues globally... view profile

Chris Grasso
Chris Grasso

Chris Grasso

Life

Chris is a freelance writer who lives in Florida and loves the sunshine... view profile

Veronica Davis
Veronica Davis

Veronica Davis

Life

Veronica is a wife, freelance writer and work at home mom. Her and her husband live in Missouri with their three boys. .. view profile

Janet Walters Levite
Janet Walters Levite

Janet Walters Levite

Entertainment

is an Optioned Screenwriter and Film Crtiic / Entertainment Writer for The Guardian Liberty Voice. She resides in New York City... view profile

Diane Crow
Diane Crow

Diane Crow

Life

Diane Crow is a columnist who has been fortunate to see her work published in numerous publications since 2009... view profile

Barry Bassis
Barry Bassis

Barry Bassis

Arts & Culture

Barry has been a music, theater and travel writer for over a decade for various publications. .. view profile

Dennis Adonis
Dennis Adonis

Dennis Adonis

News

Dennis Adonis is a Contributing Writer on Information Technology at The Epoch Times, Yahoo.com, Huffington Post, and CNN. He is also the Author of 19 books... view profile

Tommy Wyher
Tommy Wyher

Tommy Wyher

Business

Tommy is a native of the great state of Florida and has been a part of numerous startups, some successful and some not so much... view profile

Jake Crosby
Jake Crosby

Jake Crosby

Health

Epidemiologist and graduate student at University of Texas School of Public Health, Editor of Autism Investigated www.autisminvestigated.com.. view profile

DJ Miller
DJ Miller

DJ Miller

Tech

DJ Miller is an accomplished tech writer and blogger. In his spare time he writes

Fantasy sports articlesview profile

June Rousso
June Rousso

June Rousso

Health

June Rousso, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and holistic health counselor in N.Y.C. with a focus on dietary and lifestyle changes to support health. .. view profile

Sheila Kemper Dietrich
Sheila Kemper Dietrich

Sheila Kemper Dietrich

Life

Sheila is the Founder and CEO of Livliga. She created Livliga and the VisualQs philosophy out of a desire to embrace and share a healthier lifestyle. .. view profile

John Christopher Fine
John Christopher Fine

John Christopher Fine

Life

is a marine biologist with two doctoral degrees, has authored 24 books, including award-winning books dealing with ocean pollution... view profile

Adam Torkildson
Adam Torkildson

Adam Torkildson

Business

I am a business owner, and have been involved in startups and large companies at many different levels. Which I love to write about... view profile

Carol A. Hoernlein P.E.
Carol A. Hoernlein P.E.

Carol A. Hoernlein P.E.

Opinion

Currently a Licensed Water Resources Civil Engineer in NJ, Carol has also been a political blogger in NJ since 2007, after being elected Councilwoman in 2006. .. view profile

Emory M. Moore Jr.
Emory M. Moore Jr.

Emory M. Moore Jr.

Health

Over 30 years, I have been involved in the world of exercise and movement techniques, martial arts, dance, yoga, therapy and the associated disciplines... view profile

Cathy Hobbs
Cathy Hobbs

Cathy Hobbs

Life

As a nationally known interior design, real estate styling and home staging expert, Cathy Hobbs shares tips and insight relating to all aspects of the home... view profile

Liz Leafloor
Liz Leafloor

Liz Leafloor

Science

Liz Leafloor is a Freelance Writer, Copy Editor, and Graphic Artist. She explores mysterious subjects and hidden histories... view profile






  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More

  • 30 Years Of Nobel Peace Prize To Solidarnosc and Walesa Whose Dream Has Yet To Be Fulfilled

     Mr Zenon Kwoka, Interfactory Strike Committee, assists Solidarnosc leader Lech Walesa carried by the Gdansk shipyard workers in August of 1980. / Photo Courtesy of Mr. Zenon Kwoka/ Private Archives

     

    Exactly thirty years ago this month Lech Walesa, leader of the Solidarnosc movement, won the Nobel Peace Prize. In fact, it was the Nobel …

    Read More

  • World Cries for Personalism Not Capitalism

    The high rate of prolonged unemployment is a symptom not an essence of the problem, which will lead to civilizational failure. Personalism, which is based on new economic paradigm is an answer. 

    Dr. Norman Bailey belongs to a small group of economists, who warned against the current financial crisis. He does not argue that the …

    Read More

  • Ladies And Gentleman, Whoever Among You Heard About Judge Clark?

     Photo: “Nobody else helped the President so much to change the history by breaking the Evil Empire like Judge Clark”
    Judge Clark (in the middle) next to Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger talking to President at the White House. December 1983. (Courtesy of Ronald Reagan Presidential Library)

     

    The closest friend of President Ronald Reagan, …

    Read More

  • Another Day, Another Nutrition “Study”

    BREAD

    Sigh. The headlines last week were filled with talk of how the latest study showed that eating low glycemic index (GI) foods, which don’t raise blood sugar levels quickly, rather than high glycemic foods, had no effect on health. A critical look at the way the study was conceived, planned and analyzed is necessary here. …

    Read More

  • Loyalty: What It Really Is–and What It Absolutely Isn’t

    Growing up, I was taught that loyalty, like love and respect, was something that you gave unconditionally to your family–and good friends–without question; it was understood to be an integral part of just being a good relative or friend. For instance, if someone bad-mouthed your brother, or treated your best friend with disrespect, you stood …

    Read More

  • THE RISE OF CHINESE HUMANITARIANISM

    In 1859 the soon to be patriarch of humanitarianism, Jean-Henri Dunant, watched on as Emperor Franz Josef of Austria and Emperor Napoleon III of France fought the Battle of Solferino. The fighting lasted only a single day, and as the battlefield quietened Dunant descended from his vantage point overlooking the town in order to document …

    Read More

  • Bridgegate Update: Meltdown

    The infamous 3 lanes.

    Ever since I was transfixed listening to what would be called Bridgegate testimony a year ago nearly to the day, the day that Governor Chris Christie deleted texts between himself and his aide Regina Egea, I have been following Bridgegate, live tweeting the hearings, reading everything I could get my hands on, and watching every …

    Read More

  • Ferguson: Why Racism is Still a National Disgrace

    I wrote this before the Garner decision. As I publish this, NYC is overwhelmed with Christmas lights, and protestors over the latest unfathomable Grand Jury decision over the homicide of Eric Garner, father of six.  I watched the video of his death last night and I began to count how many times he said he…

    Read More

  • “Band of Brothers” Phenomena in Toxic Families

    Recently, I was talking to someone about how growing up in a dysfunctional/abusive/neglectful family created relationships between the siblings similar to those bonds forged in wartime between soldiers on the battlefield.

    I know that in my situation, being the oldest with three younger brothers, I felt an acute sense of responsibility to make sure that …

    Read More

  • (The Current) Blame Game: Recalls & Craigslist

    Earlier this week, an ABC News reporter ambushed the owner/founder of Craigslist regarding the illegal sale of recalled items currently listed on the site. The man was clearly caught off guard and did not even have a chance to really respond other than to say that he was no longer involved in the day-to-day business …

    Read More

  • Justified? My Thoughts on Ferguson

    I’ve been thinking more and more about the situation in Ferguson lately. Being a native Missourian, married to a black man, and having been treated poorly by the police in the past myself, I’ve had a lot to ponder.

    Based on what I’ve seen and heard–which, I assume, is basically what everyone else has seen …

    Read More

  • Curing Ebola with Thomas Pogge

    For all the harm that has been caused, and for all the harm that it is still likely to be caused in the near future, the current Ebola pandemic in Western Africa is merely a symptom of a much larger structural injustice concerning the global manufacture of pharmaceuticals – For this, Thomas Pogge has a …

    Read More

  • Election 2014 – Apathy Won

    Everyone Has an Opinion

    In the US, midterm elections are a strange event.  It is usually when the party in power loses some.  This year was no exception. The Democrats lost control of the Senate.  Why this occurred kept pundits busy for a quite a few days, and naturally everyone had a different opinion as …

    Read More

  • The Inequality Fallacy behind the G20 Protests

    For a mental image that instinctively breeds mistrust, imagine the twenty most powerful businessmen and women of a small town holding a behind-closed-doors meeting in order to facilitate better economic and political control over the already dominated population. Despite the professed altruism behind some of the closeted discussions, this scenario is an accurate microcosm for …

    Read More

  • Fear of Offense: Pakistan’s Blasphemy Laws

    “Falsely shouting ‘fire’ in a crowded theatre!” was the example offered by Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. when pushed to explain what a permissible restriction upon freedom of speech might look like. Holmes was using the metaphor rather tenuously as a means to justify the suppression of opposition to the military draft in the United States’ …

    Read More

  • Friends Without Benefits: The US-Turkish Alliance

    At a time when humanitarian intervention was developing into a normative standard above and beyond a legal principle, highlighted by the “illegal but legitimate” intervention in Kosovo, Turkey was afforded a privileged position of international immunity. While behaving in a manner that ordinarily ought to have defined itself as an outlier nation and a candidate …

    Read More

  • The Academic Starvation of North Korean Scholars

    The recent absence of Kim Jong Un from the North Korean political landscape shows just how starved for substance academics are on this subject.

    Following a 40 day hiatus, Kim Jong Un, though supported by a cane, strolled back into public life earlier this week in a carefully orchestrated media event. For a regime and …

    Read More

  • Why Freedom of Speech Comes First

    Democracy

    Watching the news from Hong Kong this week as democracy protests filled up the screen, I contemplated what democracy means to me and all the bumps and bruises it takes to protect it once you get it. Here are my thoughts.

    Your Voice

    Your voice is the most powerful weapon you have. The very …

    Read More

  • Political Sleepwalking

    Currently, the Australian Government is easy to criticise. But then again, what government is not? To hold any elevated position of power necessarily means to invite elevated levels of criticism.

    Whereas from opposition, a change of policy, a failure of ideological consistency, or a disregard for the majority public opinion more-often-than-not leaves no discernible political …

    Read More

  • The Lady Weeps

    Statue of Liberty taken 2014 at sunset from the AJ Meerwald.

    A Dream Ending

    This summer, during our annual trip on NJ’s official tall ship the A.J Meerwald, we passed the Statue of Liberty at sunset.  This year, I thought I saw her weeping.  As the beautiful day drew to a close behind her amazing silhouette, it seemed that the day of welcoming those huddled masses …

    Read More

  • THE RISE OF KURDISTAN

    On par with the shock value of racism, one of the most immediately apparent public faux pas today is an expressed retroactive support for the 2003 Iraq war. With all that hindsight offers, such a position appears thoroughly incomprehensible to the point that it appears to indicate a moral failing on behalf of the …

    Read More

  • Ebola on My Mind

    The Fear Factor

    It is hard to escape the news these days. What is scarier than a religious extremist with a sadistic streak, a knife fetish, and lots of stolen Iraqi weapons? An enemy you can’t see that could be infecting your family member or neighbor, right this very minute. Ebola. Fear of it has …

    Read More

  • Climate Change: A NJ Stormwater Engineer’s Perspective

    The calm before the storm.

    The March

    This week as I watched the march in NYC, I was filled with hope that at last people were hearing the dire warnings of climate scientists.  For the past few years, climate scientists and stormwater engineers like me were suffering from Chicken Little complex. The sky, laden with CO2 and methane, was literally …

    Read More

  • Not As Good As Dongding Oolong

    Back in the days, in Hong Kong, I used to have weekly tea sessions with Mr. Liu.

    In one of our first sessions, I brewed him a Taiwanese Oolong called Dongding Oolong, which he really, really liked. I can’t remember how he described it at that time, but he was so elated by it that …

    Read More

  • The Unfathomable Pu-erh

    Tea+side+2-2007+Dayi+Silver+Peacock+B

    “Pu-erh” tea is the classical music of tea. It has depth, complexity, purity, and a spiritual dimension. It is one of the few things that actually gets better with time, as it evolves rather than decays. Long-term stored Pu-erh can increase in value multiple times and is called a drinkable antique. And it surely tastes …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More

  • Back to School: Fun Healthy Lunch Ideas for Kids

    girl-eating-grapes-back-to-school

    Packing lunch for your kids is a good way to make sure they’re getting something they like and something that’s healthy for them. Yes, school lunch programs have made progress. But some schools are still very much lacking in their food’s nutritional value. Plus, it is often much cheaper to make your own. 

    The downfall …

    Read More

  • Witches’ Familiars, Spirit Guardians and Demons

    witch feeding familiars

    The folk lore of the wicked witch and her diabolical familiar is a well-known and often repeated tale. When the seasons change and the nights get long it’s not uncommon to see images and symbols of a dark-cloaked witch with an evil black cat or toad at her side. This is a fantastic archetype of

    Read More

  • Extraordinary: Woman’s Missing Brain Surprises Doctors

    Neon Brain

    When a 24 year old Chinese woman approached doctors complaining of nausea and dizziness, none of them could have expected what an extraordinary case they were dealing with. A brain scan revealed something shocking– part of the woman’s brain was missing.

    The young woman had lived normally for two decades, but had experienced dizziness and …

    Read More

  • Cloning: The Science of Resurrection

    The science of cloning mammoths and other animals. Credit: Leafloor, Deriv: (Flickr,  Rob Pongsajapan), (Flickr,  Sergei Golyshev)

     

    What do woolly mammoths, pandas, and John Lennon have in common?

    Someone out there wants them cloned. And depending on how quickly science and biotechnology develops, that might come about sooner rather than later.

    Cloning is the process of creating an exact genetic replica of an organism. We have cloned animals in the past, …

    Read More

  • Forget Killer Robots, It’s the Rise of the Cyborgs

    T1000 Cyborg at Universal

    There’s an old curse which says ‘may you live in interesting times’. 

    Cursed we are then, for living in very interesting times, especially in the innovative fields of robotics, neuroscience, and biomedical technologies. As we hurtle toward the potential disaster of a robot apocalypse, we should examine the upside of the ongoing cyborg revolution.

    It’s …

    Read More

  • Is Biofuel the Answer?

    There are now millions of malnourished children in Africa. Taking away there crops will drive many to starvation.

    The UK Energy Research Centre claimed (2009) that oil production was likely to peak before 2030 and possibly as early as 2020. We are facing a time when oil becomes increasingly expensive as resources dry up. Scientists in Kuwait predicted in 2010 (the latest prediction) that world conventional crude oil production will peak in 2014; …

    Read More

  • Incredible Things That Have Fallen From the Sky

    Raining Cats and Dogs

    Humans in their hectic, day-to-day lives are often too busy rushing about to pause and reflect; to stop, look up, and gaze at the beautiful sky. But perhaps we should pay more attention to matters above, because history shows that when we least expect it, strange things can fall out of the sky and change

    Read More

  • Ancient Remains: Iron Age Necromancy on the Bones of the Dead?

    Burial mound, Denmark

    In 2012 ancient remains were discovered in a bog in Denmark – not an uncommon occurrence. However, after examining the bones, archaeologists were startled by what appeared to be a brutal desecration of the skeletal remains. The macabre discovery tested what we thought we knew about the rituals and beliefs of Iron Age man. Archaeologists

    Read More

  • The Strange Things We Shoot into Space

    Bonsai in Space

    It’s official – humanity loves shooting things into space. Over the course of human space exploration we’ve shipped many strange things into our upper atmosphere and beyond in the name of curiosity, discovery, and science.

    This was demonstrated most recently through the art exhibit, Exobiotanica. Japanese artist Azuma Makoto launched a large helium balloon into …

    Read More

  • Falling Stars and Black Stone: Humanity’s Worship of Meteorites

    Imilac Pallasite

    NASA’s Curiosity rover recently discovered a massive metal meteorite on the surface of Mars. The first encounter of its type, the two meters (6.5 feet) wide iron meteorite has been named ‘Lebanon’, and scientists are eager to examine the find. It is the largest ever discovered on the planet.

    Back on Earth, meteorites have …

    Read More

  • Ring of Skulls: Ancient and Modern Sacrifices to the Water Gods

    Neptune Carving

    The macabre discovery of a ring of children’s skulls buried in the earth around lakes in Germany and Switzerland has revealed an age-old tradition of making offerings and sacrifices to the water gods.

     

    Archaeologists from Basel University, Switzerland found the skulls of children forming a protective ring around the settlements in what they believe …

    Read More

  • Snakes With Beards and Other Strange Serpent Tales

    Bronze bearded serpent

    The snake is one of the oldest and most pervasive mythological symbols in the world. There are as many creation myths about snakes as there are religions and cultures, and as many interpretations to the meaning of the serpent as there are stars in the sky.

    Certainly a powerful symbol, the snake is often seen …

    Read More

  • Ancient Ink: Mummies and Their Amazing Tattoos

    Mummy of the Ukok Princess/Siberian Ice Maiden. Tattoos line her arms. (Wikimedia Commons)

    Tattoos have played a role in the lives of prehistoric and modern man alike. Societal status, art, religion, and medicine all create a tradition in tattoo design that spans across centuries and around the globe. Depending on the times and culture, body art was considered to be lowly and barbaric, or a signifier of very …

    Read More

  • Antarctic Ice Collapsing; Sea To Rise

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, pictured here is collapsing. Early predictions are for a 3 metre rise in sea-level.

    Just over a month ago I was sitting somewhat bewildered at my desk and rereading two research papers about the antarctic ice collapsing. I had known about sea level rise for many years now but this was big news; the enormous West Antarctic ice shelf was melting and breaking up on a slow slide into …

    Read More

  • Shark Attacks; The Australian Story

    Andrea Lynch was one of the lucky survivors of a Florida shark attack. She required 100 stitches to repair the damage done by a Bull Shark.

    I’ve spent the last 40 years in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef and shark attacks were always a big concern. During the ‘early days’ I saw so many sharks that I included them in my census work just because they were all around me. In many places, sharks of all species averaged about …

    Read More

  • World Ocean Day and eight kids

    With bamboo from the rainforest and grim determination, eight children set out to show the rest of the world what Ocean Day was all about.

    Another year had passed and concerned people were celebrating World Ocean Day on June 8th. We all depend on a healthy and clean ocean for our very survival and the latest scientific research is painting a dismal picture of things to come. Most of us know we need to act to turn around the damage …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • Shrimp Farming; Recipe for Disaster

    Shrimp trawling is one of the most destructive fisheries in the world.

    In my last post I was talking about one of the world’s most destructive fishing methods; bottom trawling for shrimp. This is the way most wild shrimp are caught and it has created an environmental disaster in terms of destruction of the seabed and what lives there. Bottom trawling has to end if we are …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Cleveland Browns Week 11 NFL power rankings

    The 2014 Cleveland Browns are one of the more positive stories in the National Football League. A team that has largely been a NFL laughingstock is in first place in the AFC North standings in the middle of November, and northeast Ohio is the center of the sports universe thanks to the Browns and to …

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  • Cleveland Browns Week 10 NFL power rankings

    The Cleveland Browns once again impressed and disappointed against a lesser opponent, this one being the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on the first Sunday of November. Cleveland’s offense failed to produce touchdowns in the first half, and the defense of the Browns could not deal with the combination of quarterback Mike Glennon and rookie wide receiver …

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  • Cleveland Browns Week 9 NFL power rankings

    The Cleveland Browns have been on a roller coaster ride as it pertains to results and to their spots in weekly NFL power rankings. A Sunday after the Browns lost to a winless Jacksonville Jaguars side, Cleveland struggled at home against the 0-6 Oakland Raiders. It all worked out for the Browns in the end, …

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  • Week 9 NFL power rankings

    Peyton Manning and Tom Brady are playing like the two best quarterbacks in the National Football League. Yes, it is still the year 2014. You haven’t gone back in time. The two will meet again this coming Sunday for what could be an early NFL Game of the Year candidate.

    Can we fast forward past …

    Read More

  • NFL: Raiders at Browns preview

    The Cleveland Browns will be looking to avoid a second-straight loss to a winless team, this time the Oakland Raiders.

    It all went wrong for the Cleveland Browns last Sunday. What was supposed to be the start of a run that ended with Cleveland at 6-2 crashed and burned right out of the gates, as …

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  • Should Browns have Brian Hoyer on a short leash against the Raiders?

    Cleveland Browns can’t afford to be all-in on quarterback Brian Hoyer.

    One bad game.

    That is what some would say of the performance had by Cleveland Browns starting quarterback Brian Hoyer last Sunday in the team’s 24-6 loss to what had been a winless Jacksonville Jaguars side. Hoyer and the rest of the Cleveland offense …

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  • Cleveland Browns Week 8 NFL Power Rankings

    How quickly things can change in the National Football League.

    The Cleveland Browns were flying high a week ago following a dominating performance against division rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers. Any good feelings Cleveland fans had as a result of that victory were erased this past weekend when the Browns failed to show up against the …

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  • Week 8 NFL power rankings

    If there was any doubt about Denver Broncos superstar Peyton Manning being the greatest regular season quarterback in the history of the National Football League, he erased those questions from conversations on Sunday night. Manning now holds the record for most career NFL touchdown passes, and he is somehow seemingly improving with age. The Broncos …

    Read More

  • NFL: Jaguars beat Browns 24-6

    Cleveland Browns quarterback Brian Hoyer will have to wait some time before he cashes in on any National Football League contract.

    Hoyer had the worst outing to date of his professional career, the Cleveland offense was dreadful, and what was a winless Jacksonville Jaguars team stunned the Browns and the football world to the tune …

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  • NFL Preview: Browns at Jaguars

    The Cleveland Browns are big road favorites to defeat the Jacksonville Jaguars this coming Sunday.

    This is a rarity.

    Truth be told, both teams have been National Football League laughingstocks over the years. That trend may be coming to an end. Jacksonville has a promising rookie quarterback who could be the answer to the franchise’s …

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  • Week 7 Fantasy Football Start or Sit

    National Football League Week 7 fantasy football start or sit advice.

    Week 7 fantasy football start or sit: Start QB Tony Romo, Dallas Cowboys

    It’s a perfect storm going Romo’s way this Sunday. The New York Giants are the walking wounded both physically and emotionally. Romo is a good fantasy football quarterback when at home, …

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  • Cleveland Browns Week 7 NFL power rankings

    The Cleveland Browns routed hated AFC North rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers for the first time in over two decades. Veteran quarterback and hometown hero Brian Hoyer is playing well and keeping rookie Johnny Manziel on the sidelines. The defense of the Browns finally had a good game. Cleveland is at 3-2 and looking like a …

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  • Week 7 NFL power rankings

    How about them Dallas Cowboys? The clock has been turned back, as Dallas is responsible for the best team in all of the National Football League. That is represented in NFL power rankings following the Cowboys going out west and earning the biggest win the franchise has achieved in years.

    Week 7 NFL power rankings

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  • Jets CB Dee Milliner Suffers Achilles Tear

    EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - DECEMBER 22:  (NEW YORK DAILIES OUT)    Dee Milliner #27 of the New York Jets greets fans after a game against the Cleveland Browns on December 22, 2013 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Jets defeated the Browns 24-13.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

    The Jets’ secondary narrows with another loss to an inadequate and vulnerable position. 

    Jets second year cornerback, Dee Milliner underwent an MRI on Monday and tests confirmed that Milliner has a season ending torn achilles tendon – with rehab expecting to be about six to nine months. 

    Milliner exited in the first quarter of Sunday’s …

    Read More

  • Week 6 Fantasy Football Studs and Duds

    Conventional wisdom advised against starting Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton in Week 6. Newton had been inconsistent throughout the campaign, and the belief was that he was not fully recovered from ankle and rib injuries that he had suffered before the start of the regular season. Add in that Newton and the Panthers were set …

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  • Cleveland Browns crush Pittsburgh Steelers 31-10

    The 2014 Cleveland Browns are playoff contenders in the middle of October.

    Fans and analysts alike said the same about the 2013 edition of the Browns before quarterback Brian Hoyer suffered a torn ACL on a Thursday night during a game against the Buffalo Bills. Hoyer is healthy and playing well this fall, the Browns …

    Read More

  • NFL preview: Steelers at Browns

    It’s not just you if it seems as if it was long ago when the Cleveland Browns and Pittsburgh Steelers were true rivals. While the Steelers have dominated the so-called new Browns since 1999 — winning the Super Bowl on two occasions in the process — the Browns have been National Football League laughingstocks. It …

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  • Fantasy Football Week 6 Start or Sit

    Week 6 of the 2014 National Football League regular season brings with it multiple dilemmas for fantasy football owners. A plethora of first-choice running backs will be sidelined because of injuries. You could also find yourself without your WR1 or your TE1 because of injuries or Bye weeks.

    Even casual fantasy football owners don’t need …

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  • Cleveland Browns Week 6 NFL power rankings

    The Cleveland Browns made National Football League history in coming back from a 25-point deficit to stun the Tennessee Titans at Tennessee. Last Sunday’s game involving the Browns and Titans was a tale of two halves, during which the Browns played like the worst team in the NFL and then like a true postseason contender.…

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  • Week 6 NFL power rankings

    The top young quarterbacks in the National Football League can still learn a thing or two from Peyton Manning and Tom Brady. 

    Manning and Brady put on shows during Week 5 of the NFL regular season. Both made history while helping guide their clubs to victories, turning back the clock to a time when there …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More

  • Street Style Paris Fashion Week

    6149-Le-21eme-Adam-Katz-Sinding-Lily-Gatins-Paris-Fashion-Week-Fall-Winter-2014-2015_AKS6335

    Street Style is the new runway,  where the fashionistas shine and those with creative style get to show their best, on the streets of Paris. If your looking for something classic and understated or if your color is black then save it for next year and think outside the box! Fun is in the air …

    Read More

  • These Boots are Made For Stylin’

    Photo Marcus A

    My editor thought I lost my style mojo when I said CAT was a fashion-forward footwear brand and that there was a CATfootwear fashion show hosted by King’s County Distillery in Brooklyn NY. After I directed her to the CAT footwear website, her disbelief turned into: “Oh my words, these are good.” Reputation saved.

     The …

    Read More

  • Jewellery inspired by the story of Jonathan Livingston Seagull

    Brooch and Necklace -   Handcrafted wood -   Sterling Silver - Gold 18K

    When I was little, my teacher brought me a present, the book Jonathan Livingston Seagull and it was one of the best books I ever read. It talks about freedom and the way back to your true self, which is by my understanding limited by the illusion of this material world we live in. I …

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  • Breaking with “Tradition” — Who Pays for the Engagement Ring?

    stk81309cor

    Once upon a time, if a man wanted to propose marriage to a woman, he would buy her a diamond engagement ring worth two months’ salary, get down on one knee, and propose to her. Diamonds were thought to symbolize eternal love and commitment. And therefore, they were the perfect center stone of such a …

    Read More

  • The Story of the Swastika Symbol

    Swastika Golden Earrings 18K - Natalia Basdeki

     

    The Swastika symbol 卍  has long been a powerful and positive symbol in a multitude of cultures spanning the globe. It is a symbol of wealth and good fortune and has always been used as a symbol of light and wisdom. Can be found in China, Greece, Peru, India, Japan and many other areas …

    Read More

  • The Story of the Lotus Flower

    Lotus Flower Necklace

    Hello Everyone!  

    Let me introduce my self, I’m a sensitive artist from the microscopic jewellery world! Through this blog I will share with you my small creations and the stories behind them. Through my art, I aim to make people happy, remind them of some lost cultures and values, and bring them back to the …

    Read More

  • The Art of Layering your Clothing

    from workchic.com

    Being able to layer your clothing is not just a easy way to stay stylish, it is incredibly practical. When you are in-between seasons as we all are, knowing you can wear a multitude of fine layers perfect for the climate that will not bulk you out is great.

     How many ways to layer? Many, …

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  • The Life of a Personal Stylist

    Aim to have a wardrobe filled with colour, pattern & texture

    When you go to a party and people ask what you do for a job, do you get a standard next question? As a Personal Stylist I do. Men often say “Is there really a market for that?” Women “wow, cool, but what is it that you actually do?” Both regularly ask if they are …

    Read More

  • PROJECT NYC 2013 has Soul with PROJECT Sole NYC

    STYLEBOOK from Sole NYC within PROJECT NYC 2013, is ready for a look. From the very vibrant to the very comfortable, Sole has you covered..…

    Read More

  • PROJECT NYC 2013, Heats up New York with Men’s Fashion

     

    The 90 degree heat isn’t the only thing hitting New York City these days.
    PROJECT NYC 2013, the Menswear Fashion  buyers mart, will heat up Pier
    94, Sunday, July 21st. 

    Lucky  there is  the Hudson River nearby to cool down the scene.

    PROJECT NYC 2913, will house three “destinations for retailers and
    wholesalers alike …

    Read More

  • How to Buy an Engagement Ring

    A bride shows off her wedding ring after just recently being married in this file photo from 2010. (Henry Lam/The Epoch Times)

    Let’s take the ring out of bewildering. Rather, the process of buying an engagement ring should be about discovering a woman’s style and translating that into a unique, lovingly chosen ring that she will proudly wear. Here are some money-saving and time-saving tips to help you get on the right track this engagement …

    Read More

  • Red Russia Goes Black

    Models pose during the Russian Fashion Industry Presentation and Reception at the Consulate General of the Russian Federation on Feb. 6, 2013, in New York City. (By Kris Connor/Getty Images)

    NEW YORK—Having immigrated to the States at the height of the Cold War, the last thing I thought I would be attending is a showcase of up-and-coming Russian designers at the Consulate General of the Russian Federation.

    Yet there I was, awed by the resplendent setting of the consulate, attending the Russian Fashion Industry Presentation …

    Read More

  • Catching the Wave: NYC’s Arrojo Salon

    Arrojo2

    NEW YORK—I’ve never been a person to complain about my hair. 

    I’m fortunate to have hair that more or less does what it is told even in bad-hair-day conditions. It is naturally straight with long layers, not too thick or thin. 

    If I want a wave, I’ll let my hair air dry with it wrapped …

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  • Jill Stuart Spring 2013

    Jill Stuart lace gowns, Spring 2013. (Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week)

    NEW YORK—With her Spring 2013 collection, Jill Stuart stuck with what she does best—feminine, lady-like frocks that do everything to enhance the female form.

    The color palette resonated with monochromatic looks of nudes, champagnes, blushes, and of course, black.

    She briefly departed from those colors with a sea-foam Grecian goddess creation and a silver sequined …

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  • Super Saturday Raises $3.6 Million for Ovarian Cancer Research Fund

    Kelly Ripa and her daughter, Lola, enjoying the Ferris wheel at Super Saturday. (Andrew Walker/Getty Images)

    WATER MILL, NY—Every summer, hundreds descend to an open field in Water Mill, N.Y., to shop ’til they drop in the name of charity—specifically the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF), the largest private nonprofit organization in the United States dedicated exclusively to funding ovarian cancer research.

    Celebrating its 15th anniversary this year, Super Saturday is …

    Read More

  • Three Opera Recordings Starring Pavarotti at his Peak: Turandot, Madama Butterfly and L’Elisir d’Amore

    Cover courtesy of Decca

    If asked to name the most popular recording by an opera singer during the past 50 years, the obvious answer is Luciano Pavarotti singing “Nessun Dorma” from Puccini’s “Turandot.” Decca was Pavarotti’s label for his entire career and it treats his work with the proper respect.

    Decca has just released three complete operas on Blu-ray …

    Read More

  • An Interview with Chris Botti as he Gears Up for 3 Weeks at the Blue Note

    Chris Botti is Spending his 10th Annual Holiday Residency at the Blue Note Jazz Club

    It’s hard to make news playing the national anthem, unless the performer messes up, as when singers mangle the words. Trumpeter Chris Botti performed “The Star Spangled Banner” recently at the New York Giants/Indianapolis Colts game. His rendition was so moving that Colts wide receiver Reggie Wayne was caught on-camera shedding a tear. The video …

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  • The Last Days of the Schenk Production of “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg”

    These are the last performances of the Schenk production

    Wagner’s “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” clocks in at almost six hours, which may be too much of a good thing. Maybe not. The Metropolitan Opera’s revival has undeniable charm, some laughs and stirring sections, starting with the overture, beautifully played by the orchestra under the baton of James Levine.

    This is the Otto Schenk production …

    Read More

  • The Spirited “Barber of Seville” at the Met

    Photo by Ken Howard

    Giuseppe Verdi once called Gioachino Rossini’s 1816 “Il Barbiere di Siviglia” (The Barber of Seville), “the finest opera buffa in existence.” The audience at the current revival at the Metropolitan Opera would no doubt heartily agree. The opera was first performed in the Met’s first season (1883-84) and has lost none of its luster.

    The …

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  • “You Can’t Take it With You” is Revived with Verve

    Two members of the unconventional Sycamore family

    One of the more entertaining plays last season was a dramatization of “Act One,” Moss Hart’s memoir about his early career culminating in his first collaboration with George S. Kaufman. The most successful of their plays together was the 1936 comedy “You Can’t Take it With You,” which won the Pulitzer Prize and was made …

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  • “Lennon: Through a Glass Onion” Recreates the Man and His Music

    John Waters Portrays John Lennon

    “Lennon: Through a Glass Onion” is a modest, but effective homage to the late singer-songwriter.

    The 65-year old John R. Waters doesn’t try to look like John Lennon or imitate his singing though he does approximate his Liverpudlian accent. This is simply a two man show. Waters handles the narrative, the lead vocals and plays …

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  • “Hallowed Ground” Marks the Debut of a New Classical Label

    Copland's "Lincoln Portrait" by the Cincinnati Symphony with Maya Angelou as Narrator

    The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has just issued its first release on its Fanfare label. “Hallowed Ground,” taken from concerts with the Orchestra’s new music director, Louis Langrée, is comprised of three works: Aaron Copland’s “Lincoln Portrait” and two pieces commissioned by the Orchestra from composers David Lang and Nico Muhly.

    A notable aspect of the …

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  • Dmitri Hvorostovsky’s “The Bells of Dawn – Russian Sacred and Folk Songs”

    Dmitri Hvorostovsky Sings Russian Sacred and Folk Songs

    Siberian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky is one of the world’s leading opera singers. While he excels in Verdi—he will be appearing in “Un Ballo in Maschera” at the Met later this season—he is at his best in music of his homeland.

    Hvorostovsky has made many recordings of Russian music of various types, including opera, art songs …

    Read More

  • Richard Tucker Gala Delivers Despite Some No-Shows

    Dario Acosta Photography/  Richard Tucker Music Foundation

    At the beginning of the Richard Tucker Gala at Avery Fisher Hall, the late tenor’s son Barry Tucker announced some cancellations. The most disappointing was Anna Netrebko, who sent a note saying she was not going to appear because she had just played Lady Macbeth in the Verdi opera the night before and she found …

    Read More

  • Stunning Talents at Town Hall: Chris Thile and Edgar Meyer, with Cameron Carpenter and Judy Collins Later This Month

    The  Nonesuch album cover of the bass and mandolin stars

    What happens when two geniuses square off? As Chris Thile and Edgar Meyer demonstrated at their Town Hall concert, the result is beautiful music.

    Thile and Meyer are MacArthur “genius grant” winners. Thile plays the mandolin with occasional guitar and Meyer the double bass with occasional piano. They are each composers of distinction and are …

    Read More

  • Love and Death in the Met’s Doom-Ridden “Carmen”

    Don Jose Warning Carmen to Love Him or Die

    Sir Richard Eyre’s production of Bizet’s “Carmen” at the Metropolitan Opera is not for the faint of heart. Even before the music starts, the audience is placed on notice that they are about to witness a tragedy by the jagged red line, like a stab wound, across the curtain. The main reason for the enduring …

    Read More

  • Love Blossoms and Fades at the Met’s Vivid “La Boheme”

    Photo courtesy of Cory Weaver

    Is romance dead? Not at the Metropolitan Opera as long as it is still presenting the Franco Zeffirelli production of Puccini’s “La Boheme.” The Met has been phasing out some of Zeffirelli’s productions (with mixed results) but it is wise to keep this one, which has been satisfying audiences since 1981.

    The combination of Puccini …

    Read More

  • Mysticism in Music—”Dreams & Prayers” by A Far Cry

    A Far Cry's "Dreams & Prayers

    A Far Cry is a self-conducted chamber orchestra, made up mostly of graduates of the New England Conservatory. The Boston based group, founded in 2007, has started its own label, Crier Records, and has a debut release, “Dreams & Prayers.”

    The imaginative program was conceived by one of the violinists in the group, Miki-Sophia Cloud. …

    Read More

  • Jane Bunnett’s Cuban Jazz and The Cookers’ Hard Bop at the Blue Note this week

    The Canadian flute and saxophone player forms a formidable group with Cuban female jazz artists.

    The Blue Note (131 W 3rd St, NY, NY; 212-475-8592) is one of those jazz clubs where you can wander in any night and find top-notch jazz musicians. In fact, I’ve met people from around the world who do just that.

    My most recent visit was to catch the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band. The group …

    Read More

  • Trumpeter Alison Balsom’s “Paris” Honors the City of Love

    The English trumpet star plays works connected to the City of Love

    Alison Balsom is about as famous as any trumpeter in classical music today. The English virtuoso has received a number of honors; she was named Gramophone Awards Artist of the Year 2013 and has won three Classic BRIT Awards, including the Female Artist of the Year award in 2011. The fact that she has movie …

    Read More

  • A Spanish Recital by an American Beauty: Corinne Winters Sings Songs of Spain

    Corrine Winters Sings Spanish Love Songs

    Soprano Corinne Winters has been garnering acclaim in opera houses and concert halls around the world. Her debut album, “Canción amorosa—Songs of Spain” (on GPR Records), is devoted to Spanish love songs. The Spanish word “duende” is defined as “the power to attract through personal magnetism and charm.” It could be used to describe the …

    Read More

  • Joyce DiDonato Uncovers Bel Canto Gems

    Joyce DiDonato Shows Why She is a Great Singer of Bel Canto arias

    The title of Joyce DiDonato’s new Erato album is “Stella di Napoli” (Star of Naples). The title is appropriate since no opera star today shines more brightly than this mezzo soprano. The collection brings together arias from the early days of bel canto. Her earlier collection of bel canto arias, “Diva, Divo,” won a Grammy …

    Read More

  • Duke Ellington’s Rare Bethlehem Albums Are Available on CD

    30 Years of Duke Ellington Hits

    By the mid-1950’s, big band jazz was in decline. Duke Ellington (1899-1974) kept his group together with money from his music royalties. (During his lifetime, Ellington composed more than 3,000 songs.) He signed a deal to record two albums for the Bethlehem label in 1956. “Duke Ellington Presents” and “Historically Speaking” were the two LP’s …

    Read More

  • Christopher Tin’s Masterful Work on the Theme of Water

    The large scale choral work  describes water in all its forms

    “The Drop That Contained the Sea” is an ambitious work by Chinese-American composer Christopher Tin. It is also successful, artistically and commercially. The CD (on the composer’s own label, Tin Works) debuted as number one on Billboard Music’s traditional classical albums. Tin has won two Grammy Awards, one for his 2009 classical crossover album “Calling …

    Read More

  • Netrebko Sings Divinely as Verdi’s Giovanna D’Arco

    Anna Netrebko and Placido Domingo as Father and Daughter

    The life of Joan of Arc has inspired countless works (of varying quality), including plays by Schiller, Shaw, Anderson and Anouilh and films by Dreyer, Bresson, Fleming and Preminger. The play by Schiller inspired Verdi’s opera, “Giovanna D’Arco” and was one of the sources of Tchaikovsky’s opera, “The Maid of Orleans.” The Schiller play and …

    Read More

  • Tired of Sending The Same Lame Gifts To Clients?

    fruit basket

    By Deborah Asseraf

    So you’ve got your drill down, on your client’s birthdays (or their kid’s birthday depending on how savvy you are) you ship off a basket of fruit, bottle of wine or a table book. A gift so bland that whether you were sending it to someone you’ve met yesterday or your cousin …

    Read More

  • How Playing Sports Can Help Grow Your Business

    sports

    Recently, I attended a networking event that decided to get cute with introductions. They asked guests to say their names, what they do and a fun fact about themselves. I was total stumped. Working 16 hours a day leaves few hours left for more than chores, eating and sleeping. Panicked, when my turn came around …

    Read More

  • Thursday Travel to Design: Paper Lanterns

    lanterns4

    Originating in China and Japan, paper lanterns are often associated with celebration. They are usually made out of thin, brightly colored paper and bamboo or a collapsable metal frame, with a bulb or a candle placed inside, resulting in a beautiful glow!

    During the Chinese New Year, thousands of paper lanterns are lit to welcome …

    Read More

  • OO-Tray Restaurant: Unconventional But Delicious

    OO-TRAY Restaurant in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. The name derives from a French word, spelled phonetically, that means different. Myriam Moran copyright 2014

    “The food we serve is different. It’s all about having fun,” Yoel Sanchez said. He was born in Matanzas, Cuba. His family moved to Miami, Florida in 1991, then to the Keys in 1998, where Yoel attended high school. He worked in restaurants to earn money. Yoel’s father is in the stone crab and lobster …

    Read More

  • Lawsuit: Acts of God Foreseeable

    Lawsuit: Acts of God Forseeable

    In what promises to be a landmark court case, Farmers Insurance Co. has filed a class action lawsuit against some 200 communities in the Chicago Area. Farmers at the heart of its argument is claiming that local governments know or should have known the rise in global temperatures would result in heavier rains. Local governments, …

    Read More


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