Glimpses of Traditional Indian Toys
Glimpses of Traditional Indian Toys
The colorful Indian dolls are used as decorative pieces or gifts, which are traditionally created by women in the household. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

The colorful Indian dolls are used as decorative pieces or gifts, which are traditionally created by women in the household. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

A child watches as a craftswoman makes grass-stuffed elephant toy at a temporary road side shed in Hyderabad on July 8, 2011. Most of the Indians use such toys to decorate their homes. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images)

A child watches as a craftswoman makes grass-stuffed elephant toy at a temporary road side shed in Hyderabad on July 8, 2011. Most of the Indians use such toys to decorate their homes. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images)

Indian artisan works with wooden dolls known as “Kondapally Bommalu” at a workshop in the village of Kondapally, some 300 km from Hyderabad city, on December 18, 2008. The village craftsmen are skilled to transform wooden pieces into toys with a wide range of themes, including animals, occupations, daily life, and mythological characters. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images)

Indian artisan works with wooden dolls known as “Kondapally Bommalu” at a workshop in the village of Kondapally, some 300 km from Hyderabad city, on December 18, 2008. The village craftsmen are skilled to transform wooden pieces into toys with a wide range of themes, including animals, occupations, daily life, and mythological characters. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images)

A young Indian child peeps through the gap between jute dolls displayed at the annual handicraft expo in Siliguri, on December 16, 2007. Every year thousands of handicraft makers and vendors participate in this 15 day fair. (Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images)

A young Indian child peeps through the gap between jute dolls displayed at the annual handicraft expo in Siliguri, on December 16, 2007. Every year thousands of handicraft makers and vendors participate in this 15 day fair. (Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian shopkeeper adjusts “Channapatna” toys at a showroom in Bangalore city on November 12, 2010. These toys are a particular form of wooden toys that are manufactured in the town of Channapatna. This traditional craft is protected as a geographical indication under the World Trade Organization due to the originality of its manufacturing process. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian shopkeeper adjusts “Channapatna” toys at a showroom in Bangalore city on November 12, 2010. These toys are a particular form of wooden toys that are manufactured in the town of Channapatna. This traditional craft is protected as a geographical indication under the World Trade Organization due to the originality of its manufacturing process. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian youth holds puppets in his hand during a rally in Bangalore on May 10, 2010. The rally was organized to create awareness about the dying tradition of local puppet shows and the art puppet-making among the people. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian youth holds puppets in his hand during a rally in Bangalore on May 10, 2010. The rally was organized to create awareness about the dying tradition of local puppet shows and the art puppet-making among the people. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

Colorful handcrafted wheeled-drum toys at sale in the Delhi-Haat market. When a child drags along the toy while walking, its pulled string begins to beat the drum—producing a marching drum sound. (Venus Upadhayaya/Epoch Times)

Colorful handcrafted wheeled-drum toys at sale in the Delhi-Haat market. When a child drags along the toy while walking, its pulled string begins to beat the drum—producing a marching drum sound. (Venus Upadhayaya/Epoch Times)

Paper Mache toys displayed in the Delhi-Haat market. These toys are made with waste paper pulp and colored with natural dyes using a folk art tradition. (Venus Upadhayaya/Epoch Times)

Paper Mache toys displayed in the Delhi-Haat market. These toys are made with waste paper pulp and colored with natural dyes using a folk art tradition. (Venus Upadhayaya/Epoch Times)

In the era when toys are getting robotic, there are still quite a few Indian craftsmen who make eco-friendly and cheap traditional toys.

These toys highlight rich cultural and traditional value of the country, as most of these are based on the local people—reflecting their way of living and dressing.

The age old toy designing art has developed into a new era with the integration of latest technological concepts to bring in the idea of learning-by-playing. Kids nowadays indulge themselves with playstation and computer games, and have hardly experienced the fun of playing with the traditional toys.

However, since ages the traditional toys in India have been used to teach ethical and moral values to children. Playing with such toys not only keep children occupied but also make them appreciate the concept of environment friendly activities.

As traditional toys usually do not resemble any television or movie character, the child’s imagination gets a chance to explore; such toys can also be used to impart education by narrating stories. 

Making these toys is easy and truly eco-friendly as they are mostly crafted from wood, clay, and fabric. Usually vegetable dyes are used to color ensuring that the toys are eco-friendly and safe for use by children.

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