Life Lessons We Can Learn From Animals
Life Lessons We Can Learn From Animals

 

Cooperation

Geese are 71 percent more effective as a group than as individuals. Flying together, they boost each other. 

 

Our Differences Don’t Matter That Much

Kasi (L) and Mtani (R) have been buddies since they were a cub and puppy. (Screenshot/YouTube)

For more on Kasi’s and Mtani’s story and other cross-species friendships, see Cute Unlikely Animal Friends (+Videos +Photos)

 

How to Build Cool Forts

Australia’s Bowerbird has it dialed. 

A BBC video featuring David Attenborough

 

Here are a few from a Quora thread, shared by users Tom Byron, Hunter McCord, Jae Starr, Simon Brown, Martin Gavilan, Vishnu Nair, and Peter Maffey:

Dawn is the proper time to awaken, dusk the proper time to get ready for sleep. (Thanks to the birds)

Wasting food is not a good idea: All food that is hunted and eaten is never wasted. Leftovers are eaten by the next animal lower down [on] the food chain. 

Valuable life habit, not to be too lazy: Animals are incredibly industrious … [for example,] ants [and] bees. 

Choose your friends wisely: Wild animals hunt and live in packs. 

Patience: If you watch animals out in the wild, one has to [be] impressed by … their discipline and patience in stalking and hunting their prey. It struck me watching Animal Planet, watching a snake or a tiger hunt it’s prey and how patient they are in waiting for the right time to strike. It then dawns on me how often we as people are the opposite, and [we are] impatient on many things in life.

Loyalty, unabashed and unambiguous loyalty: Whether it be an animal caring for and protecting their young or my dogs going nuts when I return from the letterbox 3 minutes after last seeing them.

Bark and complain … [’til] I get what I want: A lesson learned from Dogs.

Bask in sunlight. Especially after a meal.

Take care of your responsibilities: I was sitting in the park one day, just relaxing and enjoying the weather, when I noticed a frail, bespectacled young man walking towards me with a handheld cage. The cage held a rather scruffy looking cat. The young man walked towards a quiet a spot near a tree, released the cat from its cage, and walked off. The cat followed him, made a spectacular leap, and bit him. Right in the posterior. That’s when I learned that if you try to abandon your responsibilities, they’ll come back and bite you.

*Image of a wolf pack via Shutterstock

  • konspikuous

    Hello Tara. Nice post. I would add….Cooperation, overcoming differences and building…are why there are so many of us.

    Wasting food is not a good idea: ‘All food that is hunted and eaten is never wasted. Leftovers are eaten by the next animal lower down [on] the food chain.’ That applies to human left overs as well. Though yes, we over produce, and throw a lot away…bacteria and microbes get what remains.

    Valuable life habit, not to be too lazy: ‘Animals are incredibly industrious … [for example,] ants [and] bees.’ Their DNA does not allow it. Their life expectancy is so short, that, relaxing is not required. Nor are they burdened with the likelihood of suffering complacency or melancholy.

    Choose your friends wisely: ‘Wild animals hunt and live in packs.’ Well, no, most don’t. Several species of mammal however do. As do humans…when there a necessity for it. However, since inventing agriculture and farming, not so much.

    Patience: ‘If you watch animals out in the wild, one has to [be] impressed by …
    their discipline and patience in stalking and hunting their prey.’ Because most hunts end in failure, they simply do not have the luxury of being reckless with their energy stores. Species that lie in wait, such as many reptiles, are stuck dealing with being ectothermic, they too, simply do not have the energy for leaping after everything that moves. That’s not patience you’re observing…it’s limitations.

    Loyalty, unabashed and unambiguous loyalty: Humans certainly exhibit this, often to the point of being against an individuals best interests. For example, we know the person we are loyal did something wrong, and will, risk personal loss and injury to remain loyal. We’ll even go so far as to be loyal to things that are intangible and or inanimate. Like, brands and, gadgets.

    Bark and complain … ‘[’til] I get what I want: A lesson learned from Dogs.’ Well sure, after all, the squeeky wheel gets the grease. Just, don’t cry wolf.

    Bask in sunlight. ‘Especially after a meal.’ Animals have fur, feathers, thick hides covered in mud…when we bask in the Sun, it has to be for mere moments, or, we had better have something in between us and harmful UV rays.

    Take care of your responsibilities:…Perhaps that cat was, by nature, violent, and the person you observed was merely doing the most humane thing they could think to do in order to protect themselves and others from harm, while not having the cat put down. What if there was a new infant in the home, removing a violent feline, protecting the infant, would be a very responsible thing to do.

    Life lessons from humans…most things are too complicated for a casual glance to explain. But do keep watching, observing and learning.

  • rg9rts

    Nice try no cigar. Generalizations that don’t fit most animal behavior. Most animals are loners coming together for breeding. There are exceptions to every rule lions for example are social but the only big cat that is. Browsers herd for protection, the school of fish approach hang around in a bunch and they can only pick off the stragglers, Picking and chosing examples that support the argument doesn’t make it valid for the entire population. Animals each behave according to their needs.

  • RockyFjord

    Animals are truly the best. Humans may be the worst species though. I can’t even bond with groups within my own species, though I can bond with a dog for life. We need to get ride of at least 5 billion or more humans. They need to stop breeding already, some groups more than others.

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