Japanese Princess Mako to Forego Royal Title for Love
Japanese Princess Mako to Forego Royal Title for Love

Japan is getting excited about the pending wedding of Princess Mako, the eldest granddaughter of Emperor Akihito.

The forthcoming nuptials were formally announced by Japan’s Imperial Household Agency on Sunday, reported NHK.

Princess Mako appeared with her long-time college friend, Kei Komuro, in a press conference on Sept. 3 to share these words with the Japanese people, “Today, I have received permission from the Emperor. I am very happy that we are getting engaged.”

Princess Mako, the elder daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, speaks to media with her fiancee Kei Komuro, a university friend, during a press conference to announce their engagement at Akasaka East Residence in Tokyo, Japan on September 3, 2017. (REUTERS/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool)
Princess Mako, the elder daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, speaks to media with her fiancee Kei Komuro, a university friend, during a press conference to announce their engagement at Akasaka East Residence in Tokyo, Japan on Sept. 3, 2017. (Reuters/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool)

 

(REUTERS/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool)
(Reuters/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool)

With her marriage to Komuro, Princess Mako will be giving up her title in the Japanese Royal family to become a commoner.

Komuro also spoke, “Together we would like to make a home where we can always be ourselves and live in peace.”

The couple smiled at each other while they answered some questions from the press.

The two were classmates at the International Christian University of Tokyo. Mako first met Komuro when she sat behind him at a student event for a study-abroad program in 2012.

“First I was attracted by his bright smiles like the sun,” Mako said, smiling shyly.

They started dating shortly afterwards and Mako learned that Komuro is “a sincere, strong-minded, hard worker, and he has a big heart,” she told the press conference.

Komuro proposed to Princess Mako during a dinner in Dec. 2013 after a one year long-distance relationship while both studied overseas–Mako in Britain and Komuro in the United States.

The couple has since received blessings from Mako’s parents and the Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko.

People look at a street monitor showing a news report about the engagement of Princess Mako, the elder daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, and her fiancee Kei Komuro, a university friend, in Tokyo, Japan on September 3, 2017. (REUTERS/Toru Hanai)
People look at a street monitor showing a news report about the engagement of Princess Mako, the elder daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, and her fiancee Kei Komuro, a university friend, in Tokyo, Japan on Sept. 3, 2017. (Reuters/Toru Hanai)

The announcement of the couple’s engagement had been expected in July this year, but was delayed due to devastating floods in Western Japan.

Princess Mako, 25, is currently completing her doctorate while working as a researcher in a museum.

Komuro, also 25, is a legal assistant and is studying business law at graduate school.

“Having a family still goes beyond my imagination, but I hope to make one that is warm, comfortable, and filled with smiles,” Mako said.

While the wedding details have yet to be decided, a series of rituals is required before the couple can be formally engaged and then wed. Palace officials say the wedding ceremony can be expected close to autumn next year.

Princess Mako’s anticipated marriage has reignited discussion over whether the shrinking royal family should change its rules of succession to allow women to succeed the throne.

The Japanese Imperial family, (L-R) Prince Akishino, Emperor Akihito, Empress Michiko and Crown Prince Naruhito walk on the beach at Hayama on January 16, 1993. (YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
The Japanese Imperial family, (L-R) Prince Akishino, Emperor Akihito, Empress Michiko and Crown Prince Naruhito walk on the beach at Hayama on Jan. 16, 1993. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

In a rare public appearance in 2016, Emperor Akihito, 83, told the public that he feared his age would make it hard for him to fulfill his duties and expressed his desire to abdicate. He has had ailing health since facing heart surgery and prostate cancer.

Japan's Emperor Akihito (L), Empress Michiko (2nd L), Crown Prince Naruhito (3rd L) and his wife Princess Masako (R), Prince Akishino (4th L) and his wife Princess Kiko (3rd R) and Princess Mako (2nd R) walk down a hill to greet guests during the spring garden party at the Akasaka Palace imperial garden in Tokyo on April 27, 2016. The Japanese royal family host garden parties annually, once in the spring and another in the autumn.  (SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AFP/Getty Images)
Japan’s Emperor Akihito (L), Empress Michiko (2nd L), Crown Prince Naruhito (3rd L) and his wife Princess Masako (R), Prince Akishino (4th L) and his wife Princess Kiko (3rd R) and Princess Mako (2nd R) walk down a hill to greet guests during the spring garden party at the Akasaka Palace imperial garden in Tokyo on April 27, 2016. The Japanese royal family host garden parties annually, once in the spring and another in the autumn. (Shizuo Kambayashi/AFP/Getty Images)

A bill has since been approved by Japanese lawmakers that outlines the process for Akihito to step down in the future, reported Reuters. The last time a Japanese monarch abdicated was in 1817.

The Emperor may abdicate as early as late 2018, passing the Chrysanthemum throne to his first born son, Crown Prince Naruhito, reported Fox. Naruhito has one daughter, Aiko, and no male successors.

The Japanese Imperial family get together at the Imperial Palace on December 16, 1994 during a photo session for the New Year. Princess Masako (L) became a happy member of the family in this year's session following the July marriage with Crown Prince Naruhito (R). (L-R) Crown Princess Masako, Princess Nori, Emperor Akihito, Princess Mako, Empress Michiko, Prince Akishino, Princess Kiko and Crown Prince Naruhito.  (AFP/Getty Images)
The Japanese Imperial family get together at the Imperial Palace on December 16, 1994 during a photo session for the New Year. Princess Masako (L) became a happy member of the family in this year’s session following the July marriage with Crown Prince Naruhito (R). (L-R) Crown Princess Masako, Princess Nori, Emperor Akihito, Princess Mako, Empress Michiko, Prince Akishino, Princess Kiko and Crown Prince Naruhito. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Emperor’s second born son, Prince Akishino, is Princess Mako’s father and second in line to the Throne. Mako’s younger brother, Hisahito, 10, as the only male grandson, is to succeed after his father. Mako also has a younger sister, Kako.

Japan's Prince Hisahito (C) wearing traditional ceremonial attire is accompanied by his father Prince Akishino (2nd L), mother Princess Kiko (centre R) and sisters Princess Mako (L) Princess Kako (R) after the Chakko-no-Gi and Fukasogi-no-gi ceremonies at the Akasaka imperial estate in Tokyo on November 3, 2011. Prince Hisahito, who turned 5-years-old last September had his rite of passage as a member of the Japanese royal family.  (ISSEI KATO/AFP/Getty Images)
Japan’s Prince Hisahito (C) wearing traditional ceremonial attire is accompanied by his father Prince Akishino (2nd L), mother Princess Kiko (centre R) and sisters Princess Mako (L) Princess Kako (R) after the Chakko-no-Gi and Fukasogi-no-gi ceremonies at the Akasaka imperial estate in Tokyo on November 3, 2011. Prince Hisahito, who turned 5-years-old last September had his rite of passage as a member of the Japanese royal family. (Issei Kato/AFP/Getty Images)

The Japanese royal family is the world’s oldest monarchy.

Prince Hiro (left), aka Crown Prince Naruhito of Japan, and his younger brother Prince Aya, aka Prince Akishino, wearing their new school uniforms in the grounds of Togu Palace, Tokyo, 9th April 1972. They have both started at the Gakushuin Junior High School in Tokyo. (Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Prince Hiro (left), aka Crown Prince Naruhito of Japan, and his younger brother Prince Aya, aka Prince Akishino, wearing their new school uniforms in the grounds of Togu Palace, Tokyo, 9th April 1972. They have both started at the Gakushuin Junior High School in Tokyo. (Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

 

This file photo dated 9 June, 1993, shows Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (L) and Crown Princess Masako (R) waving to people during the parade after their wedding ceremony in Tokyo. (AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (L) and Crown Princess Masako (R) waving to people during the parade after their wedding ceremony in Tokyo, June 9, 1993.  (AFP/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Japanese Emperor Akihito (2nd R), Empress Michiko (R), Prince Naruhito and Princess Masako (L) wave from a glass enclosed balcony of the Imperal Palace on January 2, 1994 while receiving New Year's greetings from some tens of thousands people. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Japanese Emperor Akihito (2nd R), Empress Michiko (R), Prince Naruhito and Princess Masako (L) wave from a glass enclosed balcony of the Imperial Palace on January 2, 1994 while receiving New Year’s greetings from some tens of thousands people. (Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)

From NTD.tv

× close
Top