Charlie Gard Hospice Move Approved: Judge
Charlie Gard Hospice Move Approved: Judge
In hospice care, life support will be withdrawn

A British judge has ordered that British terminally ill baby, Charlie Gard, should be moved to hospice care, where he will inevitably die within a short while.

Connie Yates and Chris Gard, the parents of the child, have been embroiled in a legal battle over his end-of-life arrangements.

The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, pose for photographers  as supporters hold a banner, before delivering a petition to Great Ormond Street Hospital, in central London, Britain July 9, 2017. (Reuters/Peter Nicholls/Files)
The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, pose for photographers as supporters hold a banner, before delivering a petition to Great Ormond Street Hospital, in central London, Britain July 9, 2017. (Reuters/Peter Nicholls/Files)

The BBC reported that a High Court judge on Thursday ruled he have his life support withdrawn soon after.

The judge’s order said that it’s in Charlie’s best interests for life-support to be withdrawn, adding that the child will continue to be treated at Great Ormond Street for some time before he’s moved to an undisclosed hospice.

Ruling Given In The Case Of Baby Charlie Gard's Medical Treatment
Parents of Charlie Gard, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, walk through the grounds of the Royal Courts of Justice on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Then, doctors can withdraw “artificial ventilation” after a “period” of time, the judge’s order said, according to The Guardian. All parties involved, including Charlie’s parents, then agreed that it will “result in Charlie’s death within a short period thereafter.”

His parents had sought a private medical team to care for the boy, who was born in August of last year, so they could spend more time with him.

But Great Ormond Street Hospital said that it wasn’t in their best interests.

People gather in support of continued medical treatment for critically-ill 10-month old Charlie Gard due to be taken off life support, in London on July 6, 2017. (Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather in support of continued medical treatment for critically-ill 10-month old Charlie Gard in London on July 6, 2017. (Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images)

Charlie, who would have turned 1 year old next week, has a rare genetic condition known as mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, which causes a significant drop in mitochondrial DNA in affected tissues. The condition is usually fatal in infancy and early childhood.

On Monday, his parents ended their legal fight to take their son to the United States for experimental treatment, which experts say had a marginal chance of improving his condition.

Both Pope Francis and President Donald Trump expressed support for the family.

The hospital treating the child, meanwhile, said that it received online abuse and death threats over the high-profile case.

× close
Top