Trump to Visit Scotland to Open Golf Course One Day After Brexit Vote
Trump to Visit Scotland to Open Golf Course One Day After Brexit Vote

Donald Trump confirmed that he’ll be visiting Scotland on June 24 to officially reopen the Trump Turnberry golf resort. The visit will come one day after Britain votes on whether or not to leave the European Union—known as the “Brexit” or “British Exit.” 

“Very exciting that one of the great resorts of the world, Turnberry, will be opening today after a massive £200m investment. I own it and I am very proud of it,” Trump said in a statement.

The Turnberry hotel, which Trump bought in 2014 for £35m (about $50m), opened to guests on June 1. It features a £3,500 (about $5,000) a night presidential suite and the Donald J. Trump ballroom—”the most luxurious meeting facility anywhere in Europe,” according to his publicists.

A view looking down on the green on the new par 3, 9th hole of the Ailsa Course 'Reborn' at the Trump Turnberry Resort after the re-design work carried out by course designer Martin Ebert on April 26, 2016 in Turnberry, Scotland.  (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)
A view looking down on the green on the new par 3, ninth hole of the Ailsa Course “reborn” at the Trump Turnberry Resort after the re-design work carried out by course designer Martin Ebert, on April 26, 2016 in Turnberry, Scotland. (David Cannon/Getty Images)

The trip comes at a politically volatile time, with fears that a vote for Brexit would lead to potential economic disarray, according to a study by the Global Counsel.

In March, Brexit was in the top five global risks in a list compiled by the Economist Intelligence Union, who fear the United Kingdom’s departure would be followed by a “euro zone breakup.” 

Trump, however, doesn’t seem too concerned about the vote—and didn’t seem to be aware of the term “Brexit”—appearing stumped on the question in an interview with Hollywood Reporter’s Michael Wolff: 

“Brexit, your position?” Wolff asked.

“Huh?” Trump responded.

“Brexit,” Wolff said.

“Hmm,” Trump said.

“The Brits leaving the EU,” Wolff said.

“Oh yeah, I think they should leave,” Trump said.

Trump has previously agreed with the United Kingdom leaving the EU, saying in May that if he were British, he would “want to go back to a different system.”

The other question looming over this trip is whether or not British Prime Minister David Cameron would meet with Trump, having previously feuded with the presumptive Republican nominee.

In March, Cameron called Trump’s Muslim ban “divisive, stupid and wrong,” and refused to withdraw his criticism. However, he did leave open the possibility to meet with Trump. 

“American presidential candidates have made a habit of coming through Europe and through the UK, so if that happens I would be very happy to,” he told ITV’s Robert Peston when asked if he would meet with Trump.

But he added: “I don’t withdraw in any way what I said about the policy of not letting Muslims into America. I do think that is wrong and divisive.”

In Britain there was an online petition set up that called for the banning of Donald Trump from entering the country which currently has over 580,000 votes. The petition prompted a heated condemnation of the presumptive Republican nominee in Parliament. 

× close
Top