Japan Announces It Will Start Killing Whales Again, in Defiance of International Ruling
Japan Announces It Will Start Killing Whales Again, in Defiance of International Ruling

Japanese whaling ships are set to sail on December 1, defying a United Nations ruling that the country’s “research ships” are actually commercial hunts in violation of international regulations.

Japan stopped whaling for one year after the International Court of Justice ruled that the whaling programs didn’t qualify as scientific.

But the country’s Fisheries Agency said in a statement that whaling will resume and run from December until March 2017.

The government says the re-started program takes the court decision into account, and will capture about one-third of what it used to kill, or 333 Antarctic minke whales.

Four ships will be involved in the hunt, which will also include non-lethal research.

Japan says that while it is abiding by the court decision, its practices are sustainable and animal rights concerns are sentimental and irrelevant, in a document submitted to the International Whaling Commission, according to BBC.

Much of the whale meat produced from the research runs ends up in supermarkets and restaurants.

Lawmakers and government officials try whale meat dishes to promote whale meat at a dining room of Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Tokyo Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Lawmakers and government officials try whale meat dishes to promote whale meat at a dining room of Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Tokyo Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

In this Sept. 11, 2014 photo, Kouji Takino, a chef of the Japanese restaurant "COM FOR TABLE" prepares whale meat in Ebisu, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
In this Sept. 11, 2014 photo, Kouji Takino, a chef of the Japanese restaurant “COM FOR TABLE” prepares whale meat in Ebisu, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

MINAMIBOSO, JAPAN - JULY 30:  Local children touch a Baird's Beaked whale at Wada Port on July 29, 2009 in Minamiboso, Chiba, Japan. Only five ports are allowed whaling under the coastal whaling program which tries to keep whaling tradition that dates back to the seventeenth century. Japan is only allowed to hunt a limited number of whales every year.  (Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images)
Local children touch a Baird’s Beaked whale at Wada Port on July 29, 2009 in Minamiboso, Chiba, Japan before it’s slaughtered. (Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images)

 

Australian environmental minister Greg Hunt denounced the move. “Australia strongly opposes the decision by Japan to resuming whaling in the Southern Ocean this summer,” Hunt said, reported the Guardian.

“Japan cannot unilaterally decide whether it has adequately addressed the scientific committee’s questions.”

Labor’s environment spokesman, Mark Butler, said that Australia’s concerns not being heeded properly by Japan reflected poorly on relations between the countries.

“Japan is a friend of Australia and the government should be taking every reasonable step to make Australia’s strong views on this matter known,” he said. “These whales are not being killed for scientific purposes and Japan’s activities should cease immediately.”

Japan began its so-called scientific whaling practices in 1987, a year after an international whaling moratorium took effect. The country’s officials have said many times that most whale species aren’t endangered, and noted eating whale is part of its culture.

Officials from other countries say research can be done without killing whales. “Non-lethal research techniques are the most effective and efficient method of studying all cetaceans,” Hunt said.

Japanese officials maintain the research is needed, though. 

“As we seek to resume commercial whaling, it is crucial to get information as to whales’ migration, reproductive rates and the age pyramid of the population for setting catch quotas,” a fisheries official said, reported Phys.

Lethal whaling is necessary “to get this kind of essential information.”

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