Chinese Regime Calls Nobel Contender a ‘Criminal’
Chinese Regime Calls Nobel Contender a ‘Criminal’

A protester holds a placard with the image of jailed Chinese rights campaigner Hu Jia outside a hotel where Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping stayed during his visit to Hong Kong in July, 2008. (Andrew Ross/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester holds a placard with the image of jailed Chinese rights campaigner Hu Jia outside a hotel where Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping stayed during his visit to Hong Kong in July, 2008. (Andrew Ross/AFP/Getty Images)
BEIJING—A Chinese Communist Party spokesman said jailed dissident Hu Jia was a criminal undeserving of a Nobel Peace Prize, amplifying Beijing's unhappiness at the possibility Hu could win the honour this year.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said countless other compatriots deserved consideration for the prize, but not Hu Jia, a human rights activist and Buddhist who has campaigned for AIDS patients, political democracy, Tibetan self-determination and other human rights issues that Beijing would rather not see exposed.

A Beijing court sentenced Hu to over three years' jail in April. Hu, in his mid-30s, had already spent many months under house arrest with his wife and child.

Hu's jailing drew condemnation from Washington, across Europe and from human rights advocates, and his energetic campaigning may yet win him the Nobel honour, worth $1.4 million. He has climbed to the top spot with some online bookmakers.

Communist Pressure on Nobel Committee

In a sign that the communist regime is worried that the award would invite further scrutiny of its human rights record, Qin made it plain Beijing would be outraged if Hu is named in Oslo on Friday.

"Everyone knows what sort of person Hu Jia is. He is a criminal who because he committed the crime of inciting subversion of state power, he was sentenced to a prison term by Chinese judicial authorities according to the law," Qin told a regular news conference.

"If the so-called prize is given to this kind of person, that would crude meddling in China's domestic affairs, in its judicial independence and sovereignty," he added.

‘Subversion of state power’ is a charge that is commonly used by the regime to silence freedom of speech in China.

With Reuters

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