Global Q&A: ‘In your country, are children being educated to adjust to life in an ever-changing world?’
Global Q&A: ‘In your country, are children being educated to adjust to life in an ever-changing world?’

Advances in methodology, technology in schools, and development of social skills are helping prepare children for a changing society. This is what Epoch Times reporters from Brazil to Sweden discovered when they asked locals:

“In your country, are children being educated to adjust to life in an ever-changing world?”

Lima, Perú: Patty Barsola, 24, Perfumery Promoter: I think so through new methods used in schools in my country. For example, we now have the technological advancement that helps you learn more, but also it has its downside. I have also seen that teacher's converse more with the child, giving them more confidence and explanations to questions of everyday life, and changes in our society.
Lima, Perú: Patty Barsola, 24, Perfumery Promoter: I think so through new methods used in schools in my country. For example, we now have the technological advancement that helps you learn more, but also it has its downside. I have also seen that teacher’s converse more with the child, giving them more confidence and explanations to questions of everyday life, and changes in our society.

 

Puerto Montt, Chile: Claudia Perez Vidal, 42, Secretary: I think more than adapting, children are atrophying their innate abilities for the technologies, when faced with everyday situations. When they are confronted with those situations and cannot use technology, they are left without the capacity to solve problems. A simple example is when you have to solve a simple addition, if they do not have an electronic calculator, they are lost.
Puerto Montt, Chile: Claudia Perez Vidal, 42, Secretary: I think more than adapting, children are atrophying their innate abilities for the technologies, when faced with everyday situations. When they are confronted with those situations and cannot use technology, they are left without the capacity to solve problems. A simple example is when you have to solve a simple addition, if they do not have an electronic calculator, they are lost.

 

Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain: Iván Juanes Priento, 44, Computer Technologist: There is double expectancy; on the one hand the alumnae are aware that they should be trained for a future, which is in constant and rapid change. Furthermore, to gain access to a future where change-oriented training can be applied, one surely has to emigrate. The young people in the Canary Islands and in Spain are facing this juncture today.
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain: Iván Juanes Priento, 44, Computer Technologist: There is double expectancy; on the one hand the alumnae are aware that they should be trained for a future, which is in constant and rapid change. Furthermore, to gain access to a future where change-oriented training can be applied, one surely has to emigrate. The young people in the Canary Islands and in Spain are facing this juncture today.

 

Lund, Sweden: Malin Lindman, 39, Preschool Teacher: I think that here at the kindergarten, we try to teach the children that they can have influence both here and now, and what they want to do now and later in society, and in life.
Lund, Sweden: Malin Lindman, 39, Preschool Teacher: I think that here at the kindergarten, we try to teach the children that they can have influence both here and now, and what they want to do now and later in society, and in life.

 

Look for the Global Q&A column every week. Epoch Times correspondents interview people around the world to learn about their lives and perspectives on local and global realities. Next week’s global question, “How is Chinese New Year celebrated in your country?”

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