Hong Kong Breaking: Student Leaders Joshua Wong, Lester Shum Arrested in Mong Kok Clearing
Hong Kong Breaking: Student Leaders Joshua Wong, Lester Shum Arrested in Mong Kok Clearing

Updated on Wednesday, Nov. 26 3:20 p.m. EST with quotes from Joshua Wong and Lester Shum after the photos.

Prominent student leaders Joshua Wong and Lester Shum have been arrested in police clearing of Mong Kok on Wednesday, Nov. 26 Hong Kong time. 

//

The arrests were made by Hong Kong Police Tactical Officers (PTU) at about 10:20 a.m. (9:20 a.m. EST) at the barricades between Argyle Street and Dundas Street on Nathan Road.

PTU officers clad in blue jumpsuits entered the site and started making arrests after protesters refused to clear the area following numerous announcements by the bailiffs and police.

Joshua Wong, convener of the student organization Scholarism, and Lester Shum, the deputy secretary general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students (HFKS) were at the forefront of the protesters and were promptly arrested under the charge of “contempt of court” and taken to Kwai Chung police station.

In a Twitter post, Wong mentioned that Chinese University’s Student Union member Jason Szeto Tze-long and League of Social Democrats Raphael Wong Ho-ming have also been arrested.

Wong and Shum were on scene to observe the clearing of Nathan Street in Mong Kok as per court injunctions.

A police officer tries to stop protesters pushing at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong early Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. An attempt by Hong Kong authorities to clear a 2-month-old pro-democracy protest camp in Mong Kok district spiraled into chaos Tuesday as hundreds more protesters flooded the crowded neighborhood, a flashpoint for earlier violent clashes with police and angry mobs. A total of 116 people were arrested, police said. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
A police officer tries to stop protesters pushing at the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong early Nov. 26, 2014. An attempt by Hong Kong authorities to clear the 2-month-old pro-democracy protest camp spiraled into chaos Tuesday as hundreds more protesters flooded the crowded neighborhood. A total of 116 people were arrested, police said. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

 

Protesters prepare to push against policemen at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. An attempt by Hong Kong authorities to clear a 2-month-old pro-democracy protest camp in Mong Kok district spiraled into chaos Tuesday as hundreds more protesters flooded the crowded neighborhood, a flashpoint for earlier violent clashes with police and angry mobs. A total of 116 people were arrested, police said. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Protesters prepare to push against policemen at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, Nov. 25, 2014.  (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

 

Protesters shout slogans against policemen at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. An attempt by Hong Kong authorities to clear a 2-month-old pro-democracy protest camp in Mong Kok district spiraled into chaos Tuesday as hundreds more protesters flooded the crowded neighborhood, a flashpoint for earlier violent clashes with police and angry mobs. A total of 116 people were arrested, police said. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Protesters shout slogans against policemen at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong Nov. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

 

Police officers try to stop protesters pushing at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. An attempt by Hong Kong authorities to clear a 2-month-old pro-democracy protest camp in Mong Kok district spiraled into chaos Tuesday as hundreds more protesters flooded the crowded neighborhood, a flashpoint for earlier violent clashes with police and angry mobs. A total of 116 people were arrested, police said. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Police officers try to stop protesters pushing at an occupied area in Mong Kok district of Hong Kong Nov. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

 

Police officers beat back pro-democracy protesters in the Mongkok district of Hong Kong on November 25, 2014. Hong Kong authorities tore down barricades at a protest site in Mongkok, the scene of some of the more violent clashes to take place during nearly two months of pro-democracy sit-ins. (Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)
Police officers beat back pro-democracy protesters in the Mongkok district of Hong Kong on Nov. 25, 2014.  (Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Riot police retain a man during clash with protesters at Mong Kok on November 25, 2014 in Hong Kong. The Mong Kok protest site is scheduled for clearance by baliffs this week after Hong Kong's high court authorized police to arrest protesters who obstruct bailiffs on the three interim restraining orders. (Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images)
Riot police retain a man during clash with protesters at Mong Kok on Nov. 25, 2014 in Hong Kong. (Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images)

Shortly before his arrest, Lester Shum told South China Morning Post: “We’re planning to continue our civil disobedience action when the plaintiff and police officers come, and then we are ready to get arrested.”

SCMP reports that Joshua Wong said the police were using the injunction as a smokescreen to cover up their removing of protesters before he was nabbed. Wong also accused bailiffs of failing to properly explain the court order.

“Many people arrived in Mong Kok last night because they were unhappy about police overstepping their mark,” said Wong, adding that protesters needed to “hold the fort” in Causeway Bay and Mong Kok. 

Bailiffs and plainclothes police officers arrived to clear Nathan Road shortly before 9:00 a.m. to read out the high court injunction.

Taxi drivers from the Taxi Alliance, the plaintiffs who applied for the injunction, were also present to help with the clearance.

Donning red caps and “I Love HK” T-shirt, the volunteer cleaners heckled the protesters at the barricades while they went about their job. 

When asked by Joshua Wong, the bailiffs refused to answer questions on whether people were considered to be “obstacles” for removal.

According to the South China Morning Post, Wong said police were using the court operation as a pretext for removing the protesters. He also accused the bailiffs of failing to properly explain the court order.

“Many people arrived in Mong Kok last night because they were unhappy about police overstepping their mark,” said Wong, adding that protesters need to “hold the fort” in in Mong Kok and Causeway Bay.

× close
Top