Hong Kong Police Given Go-Ahead to Clear Admiralty Protest Site
Hong Kong Police Given Go-Ahead to Clear Admiralty Protest Site
A tent with a sign on it is inside the main area of the Admiralty protest area on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

A tent with a sign on it is inside the main area of the Admiralty protest area on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Tents occupy the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014, in which the Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for the police to remove by force if necessary. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Tents occupy the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014, in which the Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for the police to remove by force if necessary. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Tents are lined in front of one of the main entrance ways of the Central Government Complex at the Admiralty Center where protesters have been occupying for almost 50 days in Hong Kong on Nov. 15, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Tents are lined in front of one of the main entrance ways of the Central Government Complex at the Admiralty Center where protesters have been occupying for almost 50 days in Hong Kong on Nov. 15, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Protesters Thomas (L) and Ethan sit inside their tent in front of the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. The two protesters were deciding if they should move their tent to a different location after hearing that the police might clear the area in the morning. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Protesters Thomas (L) and Ethan sit inside their tent in front of the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. The two protesters were deciding if they should move their tent to a different location after hearing that the police might clear the area in the morning. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Makeshift barricades made by protesters are in front of the parking area of the Citic Tower at the Admiralty protest site in Hong Kong on Nov. 17, 2014. Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for police to remove all barricades and tents if they find the area occupied. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Makeshift barricades made by protesters are in front of the parking area of the Citic Tower at the Admiralty protest site in Hong Kong on Nov. 17, 2014. Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for police to remove all barricades and tents if they find the area occupied. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Student leader Joshua Wong sits just outside the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Student leader Joshua Wong sits just outside the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Clay figurines depicting the scene when police used tear gas on Sept. 27, made by a protester are set up at the Admiralty site in Hong Kong on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Clay figurines depicting the scene when police used tear gas on Sept. 27, made by a protester are set up at the Admiralty site in Hong Kong on Nov. 17, 2014. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

A big yellow umbrella is placed in the area of the Citic Tower on Nov. 16, 2014 where Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for the police to clear the area, by force if necessary. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

A big yellow umbrella is placed in the area of the Citic Tower on Nov. 16, 2014 where Hong Kong’s high court has given the go-ahead for the police to clear the area, by force if necessary. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Hong Kong’s high court has authorized police to help carry out injunctions against the protest site in Admiralty.

On Monday, Nov. 17, the Court of First Instance briefed the plaintiffs, bailiffs, and police before giving the latter two the go-ahead to execute the court order to clear the blockage of the access into CITEC Tower, Admiralty, according to a press release.

Police can arrest those who prevent the bailiffs from carrying out their duties, and have urged those occupying the area to comply with the court order, dismantle their barricades, pack up their personal belongings, and end their act of civil disobedience.

Hong Kong publication Ming Pao reports that CITEC Tower staff will first ask the protesters to leave and try to shift the barricades themselves early Tuesday morning. If they are unsuccessful by 9:30 a.m. HKT (10:30 p.m. EST), the bailiffs and police will take over.

The student-led protesters have been occupying the area since Sept. 28, and have erected barricades and set up their tents on the roads leading to the government buildings, blocking traffic. An unofficial Facebook census puts the tent count at 2,269 as of Nov. 15.

The leaderless Umbrella Movement protesters are demanding fully democratic elections in Hong Kong and incumbent Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying’s resignation.

When asked about the police statement, protester Kawai Yu said: “I think it depends on how they do it. In Mong Kok they hit people with batons.

“If the police carry out their actions peacefully, it may be better for the movement.

“But I think there’s a high probability that the police will use violence, because they’re not saying what they’re doing.”

The 35-year-old IT worker stays several nights a week at the protest site and sleeps over in his cousin’s tent.

Yu is worried for the safety of his sister and friends in Admiralty, and says he will take a half-day and head to the protest site in the afternoon because he suspects that’s when “there will be some action” as the protesters most likely won’t cooperate with the bailiffs.

Although the police could technically move in after midnight, all is calm at Tim Mei Avenue, one of the roads leading to the government offices, and Umbrella Movement supporters are not overly concerned of pre-dawn police action. 

Like Yu, IT worker Thomas and retail staff Ethan don’t intend to stay the night, but will try to get back on Tuesday after work to check on things. The 27-year-olds have both seen the tear gas and have journeyed to the Admiralty site for more than 30 days, and they will be leaving their tent on the streets.

Protesters Thomas (L) and Ethan sit inside their tent in front of the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. The two protesters were deciding if they should move their tent to a different location after hearing that the police might clear the area in the morning. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)
Protesters Thomas (L) and Ethan sit inside their tent in front of the Citic Tower area at the Admiralty protest site on Nov. 17, 2014. The two protesters were deciding if they should move their tent to a different location after hearing that the police might clear the area in the morning. (Benjamin Chasteen/Epoch Times)

Not everyone is willing to risk arrest for occupying public streets.

When asked if he would stay if he didn’t have to work, Thomas said: “I don’t think I would stay here at this spot, but I will remain in the main area of Admiralty.

“I don’t want to have a criminal record.

“If anyone decides to stay, they should do it wisely.”

There is another court injunction taken against the protesters in Mong Kok by two taxi associations and a public mini-bus company, but the high court has yet to give a green light to the bailiffs and the police to take action.

A Hong Kong legal academic and a judge, speaking in his own capacity, have found the Mong Kok court order questionable.

However, the injunction will likely be approved, as the Court of Appeal rejected protesters’ application to overturn the Mong Kok injunction on Saturday, Nov. 15, and a TVB report claims that the Mong Kok injunction could be sanctioned after some modifications on Tuesday and will be published in the newspapers on Wednesday at the latest.

Still, the Hong Kong public might not mind if the protesters are cleared out.

A poll by the Chinese University of Hong Kong from Nov. 5 to Nov. 11 showed that about 67.4 percent of people feel that protesters should end their occupation immediately, while those who are against the movement have rose to 43.5 percent from 35.5 percent in October.

× close
Top