Subscribe

Tensions Still High in Egypt (Photos)

By Jack Phillips
Epoch Times Staff
Created: November 26, 2012 Last Updated: November 28, 2012
Related articles: World » Middle East
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

An Egyptian protester runs with a tear gas canister in his hand during clashes with Egytptian riot police in Tahrir Square on Nov. 25, 2012 in Cairo. (AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian protester runs with a tear gas canister in his hand during clashes with Egytptian riot police in Tahrir Square on Nov. 25, 2012 in Cairo. (AFP/Getty Images)

Tensions remained high in Egypt Monday as protesters clashed with security forces in Cairo and other cities over a decree that granted President Mohamed Morsi wide-ranging powers, namely over the judiciary.

At least 329 demonstrators were detained on rioting charges in downtown Cairo, reported state-run MENA. Over the past week or so, protesters have clashed with security forces around the Interior Ministry building, with some throwing Molotov cocktails and other objects, but the clashes escalated Friday—a day after Morsi issued his decree.

An Egyptian protester hurls stones at riot Police during clashes at Tahrir square on Nov. 25, 2012 in Cairo. (AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian protester hurls stones at riot Police during clashes at Tahrir square on Nov. 25, 2012 in Cairo. (AFP/Getty Images)

Thousands of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi supporters gather outside the presidential palace in Cairo on Nov. 23, 2012. (Ahmed Mahmoud/AFP/Getty Images)

Thousands of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi supporters gather outside the presidential palace in Cairo on Nov. 23, 2012. (Ahmed Mahmoud/AFP/Getty Images)

In the central city of Tanta, hundreds of demonstrators attempted to break into the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party headquarters, of which Morsi is a member, causing injury to more than 50 people, reported the Al-Masry Al-Youm publication.

Numerous protesters remained camped in Tahrir Square in Cairo, according to Reuters.

Egyptian opposition gather in sit-in tents at the landmark Tahrir square in Cairo on Nov. 25, 2012. (Mahmoud Khaled/AFP/Getty Images)

Egyptian opposition gather in sit-in tents at the landmark Tahrir square in Cairo on Nov. 25, 2012. (Mahmoud Khaled/AFP/Getty Images)

On Monday, Morsi met with several key judges in an attempt to diffuse mounting tensions. 

Morsi’s office had said the constitutional decree is only temporary. While meeting with judges Monday, he reiterated such claims.

Egyptian activists lift the coffin of Gaber Salah, an activist who died overnight after he was critically injured in clashes near Cairo's Tahrir Square last week, during his funeral at Tahrir Square on Nov. 26, 2012 in Cairo. (Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images)

Egyptian activists lift the coffin of Gaber Salah, an activist who died overnight after he was critically injured in clashes near Cairo's Tahrir Square last week, during his funeral at Tahrir Square on Nov. 26, 2012 in Cairo. (Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images)

Egyptian supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi clash in the Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria on Nov. 23, 2012. (AFP/Getty Images)

Egyptian supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi clash in the Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria on Nov. 23, 2012. (AFP/Getty Images)

The decree prevents the dissolution of the Shura Council, the upper house of parliament, and the People’s Assembly—the lower house of parliament. It also allows Morsi to appoint a new prosecutor-general, who will reopen cases involving the killing of protesters last year.

With the decree, political opponents and some notable judges have accused Morsi of trying to consolidate power for himself, with some going so far as to claim he is now worse than toppled former President Hosni Mubarak.

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 19 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter

Protesters demonstrating against Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi run from tear gas fired by Egyptian riot police during clashes in Tahrir Square on Nov. 23. (Ahmed Mahmoud/AFP/Getty Images)

Protesters demonstrating against Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi run from tear gas fired by Egyptian riot police during clashes in Tahrir Square on Nov. 23. (Ahmed Mahmoud/AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian man walks over a graffiti reading "Morsi Go" on Nov. 25, 2012 in Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mahmoud Khaled/AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian man walks over a graffiti reading "Morsi Go" on Nov. 25, 2012 in Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mahmoud Khaled/AFP/Getty Images)



  • truthbefree

    Glad no one was hurt. Obviously bridge was not built how it should be. Also interesting how it was when the Chinese flag reached the middle that it finally gave way….imo the amount of bad karma connected to the flag was just too much for the poor bridge to handle.


GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Hong Kong