Subscribe

Global Q&A: ‘What’s your country’s biggest foreign policy threat?’


Epoch Times Staff
Created: February 6, 2013 Last Updated: February 13, 2013
Related articles: World » International
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

Foreign policy issues faced by countries across the globe include standing up against human rights violations, outsourcing jobs, and getting involved in Middle East conflicts. This is what Epoch Times reporters from Colombia to Sweden discovered when they asked locals:

What’s your country’s biggest foreign policy threat?

Ricardo Arturo Cano, Medellín, Colombia (The Epoch Times)

Ricardo Arturo Cano, Medellín, Colombia (The Epoch Times)

Medellín, Colombia

Ricardo Arturo Cano, 40, Merchant

Acceleration of the globalization process has had a profound impact on questioning the main assumptions of international relations from multiple perspectives—the crisis facing the country today, characterized by lawlessness, instability, lack of credibility, and legitimacy of public institutions; the alarming violation of human rights; and the growing unemployment. It makes it necessary to analyze the links between the internal situation and external relations, because the first one has perhaps the greatest impact factor in formulating an effective foreign policy for Colombia for the future; this is largely because of globalization.

Evan, New York, USA (The Epoch Times)

Evan, New York, USA (The Epoch Times)

New York, USA

Evan, 26, Film Editor

Israel is by far the biggest foreign policy threat to America because its bellicosity threatens to drag us into a regional conflict we’re not prepared to finish. I feel that Israel feels that America has its back and [Israel] is willing to a certain extent to start a fight with Iran specifically, or Syria, that they’re going to sort of expect us [USA] to get involved. And I think that will be a real disaster for the U.S. because as we’ve seen with Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. engagement in the Middle East is not really something that tends to work out very well for us.

Ed Leiva, Puerto Montt, Chile (The Epoch Times)

Ed Leiva, Puerto Montt, Chile (The Epoch Times)

Puerto Montt, Chile

Ed Leiva, 24, Religion Teacher

As I see it, the greatest threat to foreign policy is to import other peoples’ models, for example, consumerism of developed countries, which tends to destroy human values and morals. The only thing that matters is the value to consumerism and to materialism, while it is true that the technology is very useful. It also contributes toward destroying the family, where currently children do not know their parents and their parents don’t know their children. We’re becoming individualistic and without spiritual values.

Gunnar Andersson, Lund, Sweden (The Epoch Times)

Gunnar Andersson, Lund, Sweden (The Epoch Times)

Lund, Sweden

Gunnar Andersson, 89, Retired

Considering the world that we live in today, I think that the biggest foreign policy threat for our country is China. We cooperate with them, but at the same time they are a threat to us, because they take all the jobs from us. I read in the newspaper yesterday that they bought Volvo for US$6 billion, but Volvo will continue to work both in Sweden and even in China. You can understand from watching TV, that China still hasn’t abandoned the communist regime, but they become more in the middle, more “middle friendly,” I think.

Aya Hassan, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (The Epoch Times)

Aya Hassan, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (The Epoch Times)

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Aya Hassan, 24, Graduate Student

I have been a resident of the UAE since 14 years of age, but I am originally from Egypt. Egypt is a country that has been under a corrupt regime for more than 30 years hence most of its foreign affairs are not well founded. But since it’s located in Africa its biggest foreign policy threat is one for concern—the international waters of the Nile. Ethiopia is the biggest and most problematic country since it’s one of the “Nile Valley” countries, and it has dilemmas concerning the ownership of the Nile waters since it also has the Nile running into its borders.

Armando Manoel de Souza Filho, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (The Epoch Times)

Armando Manoel de Souza Filho, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (The Epoch Times)

Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Armando Manoel de Souza Filho, 54, Nurse

The foreign policy that affects most of Brazil is the USA through the dollar factor, which hugely influences the internal market of our country. It has a strong influence on the economy because of the interference with the prices of merchandise, appliances, et cetera.

Luis Calderón, Lima, Peru (The Epoch Times)

Luis Calderón, Lima, Peru (The Epoch Times)

Lima, Peru

Luis Calderón, 62, Customs Specialist

I think the greatest threat of foreign policy in my country is that the president of Peru visits the president of Venezuela, because he is allied with Cuba. It is a danger because they are actually thinking to remain in power, and suddenly there are some changes—such laws that allow members of the family of President Ollanta to be candidates for the presidency after him. It is very suspicious because there are continually interviews about the possible application of Ollanta’s wife. This seems very suspicious.


Look for the Global Q&A column every week. Epoch Times correspondents interview people around the world to learn about their lives and perspectives on local and global realities. Next week’s global question: “Do you celebrate Valentine Day?”

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 21 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter.




GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Consummate Traveler