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Global Q&A: ‘What do you think the future of radio will look like?’


Epoch Times Staff
Created: February 20, 2013 Last Updated: February 21, 2013
Related articles: World » International
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Radio is here to stay, albeit with a diminished presence, that could eventually become an emergency communication tool only. This is what Epoch Times reporters from New York to Lima gathered from various responses when they asked locals:

What do you think the future of radio will look like?

Ryan Alexander, New York, USA (The Epoch Times)

Ryan Alexander, New York, USA (The Epoch Times)

New York, USA

Ryan Alexander, 25, Music Industry

I think the future of the radio is going to slowly decline and less people are going to start using it. And [they will] use digital platforms like cellphones that have Spotify or Pandora; it’s just a different type of radio. But I think AM/FM radio is slowly going away; I would say in the next five years. There’s XM satellite radio. I’m sure they’re going to develop ways to hook gear on your phone, like with Bluetooth, or some type of technology, and stream it through your service.

Peder Andersson, Dalby, Sweden (The Epoch Times)

Peder Andersson, Dalby, Sweden (The Epoch Times)

Dalby, Sweden

Peder Andersson, 50, Systems Engineer

I think that analog radio will disappear in the near future and will be replaced by Internet-based radio. I think more people will listen to their mobile phones, you can see these kind of processes already in today’s society.

Beth Asuncion, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (The Epoch Times)

Beth Asuncion, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (The Epoch Times)

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Beth Asuncion, 21, Student

There’s a lot to explore and discuss about the future of radio and the challenges they are faced with, but I guess simply, in my opinion: I’d rather hear the news and other current affairs, than read it. That way I can do other tasks and still get updated. And think about it, when a disaster strikes say a zombie apocalypse, and technology and the Internet go down, radio will still be there. Maybe not for news, but definitely as a valuable means of communication! Viva radio!”

Sinaldo Bispo dos Santos, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (The Epoch Times)

Sinaldo Bispo dos Santos, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (The Epoch Times)

Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Sinaldo Bispo dos Santos, 45, Cook

With technological developments, mainly of computers, information comes very fast. … There are several changes, ancient to modern, and we’re hearing a lot less radio in general. And I say that will be a doubtful future—not to hear so much as before. We are using the current devices CDs, DVDs, and pen drives, et cetera, to meet the sound and adapt to modernization. This is the way we live today.

Roberto Pascual Poyato, Zaragoza, Spain (The Epoch Times)

Roberto Pascual Poyato, Zaragoza, Spain (The Epoch Times)

Zaragoza, Spain

Roberto Pascual Poyato, 34, Auto Mechanic

The future of radio, I have heard, can give a lot of versatility—ensuring its survival. For me, the greatest strengths of the radio are that you can tune almost anywhere, and you can listen while you do other things, like work, or drive. With respect to the Internet, I see that moment in time when the radio is tuned only online, because the quality of the signal has to be extremely good, to avoid a cut in transmission.

Angana Sripur, Bangalore, India (The Epoch Times)

Angana Sripur, Bangalore, India (The Epoch Times)

Bangalore, India

Angana Sripur, 20, Bachelor of Media Studies Student

Radio, which was one of the most sought after forms of passive entertainment up until the 21st century seems to have taken a hit globally after the advent of the iPod, mp3 player, and the smartphone. …. The future of radio seems to be declining, however these are some aspects that might emerge strongly: Online radio, as the Internet now rules the roost; Local emphasis, radio will get more local in its approach to win over listeners; ever-increasing advertisements, in order to earn more revenue, however, this will only put off listeners.

Marlene Espinoza, Lima, Peru (The Epoch Times)

Marlene Espinoza, Lima, Peru (The Epoch Times)

Lima, Peru

Marlene Espinoza, 48, Contadina

I believe that radio will never disappear. It is useful, for example, to people working because while performing their tasks they can listen to the news without being distracted. Listening to music is relaxing. With no radio, I think we would be bored and uninformed. We also have the advantage of not watching very unpleasant news scenes as seen on television. There are distant villages where radio is the only form of receiving news, and is therefore essential.

Jessica Contreras Canas, Puerto Montt, Chile (The Epoch Times)

Jessica Contreras Canas, Puerto Montt, Chile (The Epoch Times)

Puerto Montt, Chile

Jessica Contreras Canas, 29, Teacher

Well, I think the radio since its invention, has been indispensable to the community. When television came and it was extremely popular, there was talk of whether it would disappear. But, radio’s essential role has become indispensable to society. Its future is linked to technological progress that is in the DNA of the community.

Mark Hodson, Sunshine Coast, Australia (The Epoch Times)

Mark Hodson, Sunshine Coast, Australia (The Epoch Times)

Sunshine Coast, Australia

Mark Hodson, 38, Bachelor of Science Student and Painter

It’s going to go more online definitely, but I personally will support Triple J, because they support local live music where the other commercial stations, they tend to play a lot of American music on high repeat. Triple J is a radio station that promotes local Australian musicians who write their own music. … As long as car stereos are common, people will still listen, but with all music available on the Internet (YouTube) radio won’t be as popular.


Look for the Global Q&A column every week. Epoch Times correspondents interview people around the world to learn about their lives and perspectives on local and global realities. Next week’s global question: “What do you enjoy most about being a senior?”

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 21 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter.

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