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2011 & Beyond: Arab Spring Continued

By Joshua Philipp
Epoch Times Staff
Created: December 27, 2011 Last Updated: January 1, 2012
Related articles: World » International
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Anti-military rule protestors—hoping not to lose the gains made in ousting the Hosni Mubarak regime—attend a demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Dec. 2. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

Anti-military rule protestors—hoping not to lose the gains made in ousting the Hosni Mubarak regime—attend a demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Dec. 2. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

Many of the events that defined 2011 will not dissolve into history when the calendar turns the page. The events that were set in motion this year will continue to play out and shape the year to come. The Epoch Times recaps pivotal moments and movements around the globe that are sure to make the headlines again in 2012.

In late 2010, nobody could have predicted that the wave of demonstrations across the Arab world would grow into revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, civil war in Libya, and regime changes in all three. 

In the coming year, protest movements are likely to continue, while the world watches how the future unfolds for Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. As a regional leader, Egypt’s election of the Muslim Brotherhood may have set the tone for other countries. Democratically elected governments in the Arab world have been grounds for concern, with votes going to parties showing support for terrorism, or to terrorist organizations themselves, such as the Hamas election in Palestine.

Syria is also near the boiling point, and Iran could easily erupt into another, more determined round of green movement demonstrations. The multitiered conflicts in Yemen—including anti-government unrest, terrorist activity, and anti-terrorist operations—could also escalate.

Similarly, Algeria, Kuwait, and Morocco could also produce revolutions, civil war, or shifts in government direction. Saudi Arabia will be a critical country to watch. There have also been incidents of unrest and suppression, and with the recent death of the Crown Prince Sultan, and the power reorganization that followed, any chaos there could have a huge impact being the world’s largest producer and exporter of oil. The death of King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz could be the trigger along with growing unemployment among the youth—a trigger point in many of these countries. 

Meanwhile, the Jasmine Revolution in China will likely continue to grow quietly. News is often prevented from reaching the outside world, but scenes that have emerged show major protests have happened, yet were crushed by the regime.




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