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$1,800 ATM Mistake is Not the First

By Kelly Ni
Epoch Times Staff
Created: March 4, 2013 Last Updated: March 4, 2013
Related articles: World » International
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A student at the University of Delaware, tried to get cash out of an ATM on campus on Feb. 1, and he walked away with more money than he expected. ATM mistakes gave extra cash to college students, gamblers, a schoolteacher, and others in the United States, Scotland, and India.

A college student received $1,800 by mistake at an ATM machine in Delaware. He returned the money. Other people around the world experienced ATM mistakes, as well. Yet, not everyone returned the money. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

A college student received $1,800 by mistake at an ATM machine in Delaware. He returned the money. Other people around the world experienced ATM mistakes, as well. Yet, not everyone returned the money. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

When Devon Gluck, a senior finance major student at the University of Delaware, tried to get cash out of an ATM on campus on Feb. 1, he walked away with more money than he expected. 

After the machine made strange noises, it dumped 18 $100 bills into Gluck’s hands, reported the Associate Press. He took the money and thought about what to do with it. 

“After a couple days of just thinking about it … the right thing would be just to return the money,” Gluck said. “It was just eating at me at the whole time because it isn’t mine and I didn’t even know what to do with it.”

“I kind of just thought, ‘Maybe I can get something good out of this,’” Gluck said. “I’ll definitely feel better, and I’m looking into going into banking and finance, so I felt like this was a good opportunity to meet someone, get a good reference, and do the right thing.”

Here is a list of other ATM mistakes:

Unfortunately, not everyone was as honest as Gluck, but some were. 

1. In 2008, an ATM on campus at the University of Missouri was dispensing $20 bills instead of $10 bills, reported The Maneater, the university’s student newspaper. 

The students were being charged for the lesser amount of $10.00. Students took advantage of the opportunity and piled up at the ATM. 

“Taking money that is not yours is stealing,” University of Missouri Police Department Captain Brian Weimer said to the school paper. “There could be legal ramifications with it.”

The bank declined to comment. Meanwhile, students continued to line up at the ATM. One student said that the line wrapped around the door, and she waited for 40 minutes, according to The Maneater. 

2. In 2009, a man named Ronald Page was able to withdraw unlimited amounts of cash from ATMs at casinos in the Detroit area. Page decided to go on a gambling spree. 

Originally, he had only a couple hundred dollars in his bank account, but the ATM he used at a casino allowed him to make unlimited withdraws. 

Page withdrew $1.5 million and gambled it away in just a matter of days before the bank caught on. He pleaded guilty to charges of bank theft funds and faced up to 15 months in prison, according to ABC.

3. In 2012, an ATM in Scotland dispensed extra cash, and dozens of people lined up to withdraw money as the news spread on Twitter, according to the BBC. 

Local police said that they were alerted to the incident at the Bank of Scotland around lunchtime, reported the BBC. 

Officers went to the scene and alerted the bank, which was able to switch off the machine remotely.

4. In 2012, Parijat Saha, a schoolteacher in India, saw $9.8 billion in his bank account. In India, that would have been 496 billion rupees, according to MSN Money. He called the bank to report the mistake. 

The bank would not explain how the large sum of money ended up in Saha’s bank account. 

“Red-faced bank officials would not comment, but sources say the funds were ‘uncleared’ and he could not have withdrawn the money if he had tried,” BBC reported.

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