Subscribe

2012 & Beyond: Whirlwind Year of Development in NYC

By Zachary Stieber
Epoch Times Staff
Created: December 30, 2012 Last Updated: January 5, 2013
Related articles: United States » New York City
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

A rendering of Cornell University's applied sciences campus, planned to open on Roosevelt Island in 2017. (Courtesy of Kilograph 2012)

A rendering of Cornell University's applied sciences campus, planned to open on Roosevelt Island in 2017. (Courtesy of Kilograph 2012)

NEW YORK—A year of whirlwind of development activity in New York began with Cornell University and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology winning an applied sciences competition in Dec. 2011. Cornell won tax-free land and $100 million for a new campus on Roosevelt Island.

Later, through the competition, Columbia University was given $15 million in city assistance for a new data sciences and engineering building, and a consortium led by New York University (NYU) got up to $15 million in benefits for a new applied science center in downtown Brooklyn.

Opponents of the New York University expansion in Greenwich Village at a City Council hearing in July. After the council passed the plan a week later some of the opponents sued the city over the plan. (Zachary Stieber/The Epoch Times)

Opponents of the New York University expansion in Greenwich Village at a City Council hearing in July. After the council passed the plan a week later some of the opponents sued the city over the plan. (Zachary Stieber/The Epoch Times)

NYU’s other expansion, in Greenwich Village, angered residents, who were in staunch opposition. The expansion—four buildings totaling 1.9 million square feet in new space—was approved by the City Council, after which opponents sued.

The Barclays Center in downtown Brooklyn. Despite provoking controversy of alleged shady business practices and not hiring locals for construction jobs, the center was completed in Sept. (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)

The Barclays Center in downtown Brooklyn. Despite provoking controversy of alleged shady business practices and not hiring locals for construction jobs, the center was completed in Sept. (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)

A proposal to build two glass towers on top of the historic Chelsea Market, was passed by City Council, amid much contention. An even more controversial development—the Barclays Center in Brooklyn—opened in September. Forest City Ratner, the company in charge, has been criticized for a lack of transparency and for not providing the promised number of local jobs.

Ground was broken on the new Hudson Yards neighborhood in Midtown on the West side. The 26-acre site, said to be the largest private development project in the country, will feature green space as well as multiple residential and office towers.

1 World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. Though two of the five towers lack financing for continued construction, 1 and 4 World Trade Centers are scheduled to be completed in 2013. (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)

1 World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. Though two of the five towers lack financing for continued construction, 1 and 4 World Trade Centers are scheduled to be completed in 2013. (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)

In Lower Manhattan, development of the the World Trade Center (WTC) site slowed down due to financing. Construction on 2 WTC and 3 WTC has halted, but 1 WTC and 4 WTC are slated for completion in 2013.

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 20 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter.

Please send news tips to nyc_news@epochtimes.com

 




GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Ralph Dzegniuk