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Sequestration: Top 4 States With Largest Losses

By Kelly Ni
Epoch Times Staff
Created: February 28, 2013 Last Updated: February 27, 2013
Related articles: United States » National News
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Florida is projected to lose $3.8 million in nutrition programs for seniors. The state’s capital is Tallahassee. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Florida is projected to lose $3.8 million in nutrition programs for seniors. The state’s capital is Tallahassee. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

The top four states with the largest amount of reductions in money, programs, and employees due to the sequester would be California, Texas, New York, and Florida.

With the sequester deadline approaching on Mar. 1, the following cuts could automatically go in effect if President Barack Obama and Congress do not work together to come up with a plan.

The top losses in programs would be to K–12 education, work-study programs for college students, environmental protection, the Department of Defense, military programs, grants for various government programs, job assistance programs, violence against women initiatives, childcare for low-income families, vaccination assistance, public health programs, and senior nutrition meals.

Here is an in-depth summary of what each of the top four states would lose due to the sequester. These figures are estimates just for the year 2013, issued by the White House.

California

California is projected to lose $87.6 million in K-12 education because of the sequestration. (David Paul Morris/Getty Images)

California is projected to lose $87.6 million in K-12 education because of the sequestration. (David Paul Morris/Getty Images)

California would lose $87.6 million in K–12 schools, cutting funding for teachers, students, and schools. Teachers, aides, and staff who assist children with disabilities would lose an additional $62.9 million.

The California work-study program would not be able to provide college aid to 9,600 low-income students, and 3,690 students would not get work-study jobs to help them pay for college. 

The state would lose $12.4 million in environmental protection programs and another $1.9 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

The Department of Defense (DOD) would have to put 64,000 employees on unpaid leave in order to reduce gross pay by $399.4 million. 

California
  • 1,210 teacher and aide jobs at risk
  • 187,000 fewer students served
  • 320 fewer schools without funding
  • 760 staff for children with disabilities without funding

California Army bases would have to cut $54 million, Air Force bases would have to cut $15 million, and the Navy would have to cancel the maintenance and repair of 5 ships, as well as cancel aircraft depot maintenance in North Island. 

Justice Assistance Grants would lose $1.6 million. Programs funded by the grants include law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, and crime victim and witness initiatives. 

A total of 129,770 people would not get job search assistance, as the job search assistance program would lose $3.3 million.

Up to 2,000 disadvantaged children could lose childcare.

Vaccination assistance programs would be cut by $1.1 million, resulting in 15,810 children not receiving vaccines.

Public health protection initiatives would lose $2.6 million in funds, $12.4 million in grants that help prevent and treat substance abuse, and $2 million in HIV testing programs. 

There would be 3,000 victims that would not get help from the STOP Violence Against Women Program—a program that seeks to change policies and practices to put an end to violence against women. 

California’s nutrition assistance program for seniors would lose $5.4 million. 

Texas

Texas is projected to lose 52,000 DOD employees because of the sequestration. (Tim Sloan/Getty Images)

Texas is projected to lose 52,000 DOD employees because of the sequestration. (Tim Sloan/Getty Images)

K–12 education cuts in Texas would total $67.8 million. Teachers, aides, and staff who assist children with disabilities would lose $51 million.

Work-study programs would not be able to provide college aid for 4,720 low-income students, and 1,450 students would not get work-study jobs to help them pay for college.

Head Start, the federal pre–K program, would stop serving 4,800 children in the state. 

Environmental protection programs for clean air and water would be cut by over $8 million, and over $2 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection would be cut.

The military would stop pay for 52,000 DOD employees in Texas in order to reduce gross pay by $274.8 million. The state would see cuts of $233 million to Army base operations, $27 million to Air Force operations, and the Navy would reduce procurement of the Joint Strike Fighter. 

The world-renowned Blue Angels show in Corpus Christi and Fort Worth would be canceled. 

The state would lose about $1.1 million in Justice Assistance Grants for law enforcement and public safety.

Job search assistance programs would be cut by over $2.2 million, thus becoming unable to serve 83,750 people.

Texas
  • 930 teacher and aide jobs at risk
  • 172,000 fewer students served
  • 280 fewer schools without funding
  • 620 staff for children with disabilities without funding

Childcare services would stop serving 2, 300 disadvantaged children. 

Texas would not be able to give vaccines to 9,730 children due to funds being reduced by $665,000.

Public health protection initiatives would be cut by $2.4 million, substance abuse programs would be cut by $6.7 million, and 28,600 fewer HIV tests would be given.

The STOP Violence Against Women program could lose $543,000. 

Senior nutrition meal programs in the state would lose $3.5 million.

New York

New York is projected to lose $12.9 million in environmental protection programs because of the sequestration. (Daniel Barry/Getty Images)

New York is projected to lose $12.9 million in environmental protection programs because of the sequestration. (Daniel Barry/Getty Images)

Education in K–12 would lose $42.7 million, and teachers, aides, and staff who assist children with disabilities would lose $36.3 million.

Work-study programs in New York would not be able to provide college aid to 4,520 low-income students, and 4,150 students would not get work-study jobs to help pay for their college education.

Head Start and Early Head Start would cease to serve 4,300 students. 

New York’s environmental protection programs for clean air and water would lose $12.9 million, and $1.2 million in grants would not go to fish and wildlife protection. 

The DOD would lose 12,000 employees in order to reduce gross pay by $60.9 million. Army bases would lose $108 million in operation funding. 

Law enforcement and public safety funds for crime prevention and prosecution would be cut by $780,000.

New York
  • 590 teacher and aide jobs at risk
  • 70,000 fewer students served
  • 120 fewer schools without funding
  • 440 staff for children with disabilities without funding

Job search assistance programs would have to cut $884,000 and would not be able to help 46,230 people.

Childcare for 2,300 disadvantaged children would stop, and New York would not be able to give vaccines to 7,170 children. 

Public health protection programs would lose $1 million, and the health departments would not be able to give 68,200 HIV tests.

The STOP Violence Against Women program would not be able to help 1,600 victims upon losing the projected $412,000.

Nutrition assistance programs for seniors would lose $1.4 million.

Florida

A seal of the Florida House of Representatives is seen in Tallahassee, Fla. (Alex Wong/Newsmakers)

A seal of the Florida House of Representatives is seen in Tallahassee, Fla. (Alex Wong/Newsmakers)

Education in K–12 would lose $54.5 million, and education for children with disabilities would lose $3.1 million in funding. 

Work-study programs would not be able to provide 6,250 low-income students with college aid, and 1,700 students would not get work-study jobs to help them pay for college. 

Head Start and Early Head Start in Florida would stop serving 2,700 children.

Environmental protection programs in the state for clean air and water would be cut by $5.2 million, and $1.1 million would be cut from fish and wildlife protection. 

The DOD would cut 31,000 jobs and a total of $183.2 in gross pay.

Florida Army base operations would be cut by $7 million, Air Force operations would be cut by $23 million, and Navy funding for aircraft depot maintenance would be cut by $135 million. Four demolition projects in Pensacola, costing $3.2 million, would be canceled. 

Law enforcement and public safety funds for crime prevention and prosecution would lose $970,000. 

Florida
  • 750 teacher and aide jobs at risk
  • 95,000 fewer students served
  • 130 fewer schools without funds
  • 380 staff for children with disabilities without funding

Job search assistance programs would not be able to help 78,960 people if funding is cut by the projected $2.3 million.

Childcare would stop for 1,600 disadvantaged children. 

Florida public health protection programs would be cut by $1.8 million, 4,500 people would not receive help through substance abuse programs, and 35,900 people would not be tested for HIV. 

The STOP Violence Against Women program would not be able to help 1,500 victims if the projected $404,000 gets cut from their budget. 

The nutrition program for seniors will lose $3.8 million.

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  • http://twitter.com/papicek Brett

    After the 1979 Chrysler bailout, management relentlessly pursued concessions in union contracts. They had learned that working people would trade job security (which was not guaranteed—the jobs fled, regardless) for cuts in pay and benefits:

    http://imageshack.us/a/img62/843/nationalemploymentindex.png

    A side effect or part of the strategy of cutting government spending? Probably a bit of both, but I’ll go out on a limb and predict a lot of pressure put on public sector unions, and the majority of union members left in the US are in public sector unions.

    We are, in fact, at a 97 year low in percentage of workforce who are union members:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/business/union-membership-drops-despite-job-growth.html?_r=0

    I’ll also go out on limb and predict that red-state/blue-state won’t make much of a difference in this. Democratic governors will be as likely to pursue concessions as GOP governors.

    Welcome to the new normal.


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